Mesopotamia History
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Bahrain history slowly rises from sands

Bahrain history slowly rises from sands | Mesopotamia History | Scoop.it

More than 4,000 years ago, Dilmun merchants traveled from Mesopotamia to the Indus River, titans of trade and culture before rise of the empires of the Persians or the Ottomans

Over a millennia, the civilization that Dilmun created on the back of trading in pearls, copper and dates as far as South Asia faded into the encroaching sands. It wasn't until an excavation by Danish archaeologists in the 1950s that its past was rediscovered.

Now, with Bahrain in a deepening political crisis between its Sunni rulers and majority Shiite population, the connection to ancient Dilmun is one of the few unifying symbols on the island. It also is a rare and vivid look at pre-Islamic life in a region with few sites celebrating cultures before the time of the Prophet Muhammad.


Via David Connolly
Ryley Caron's insight:

This is amazing how these buildings are still standing, or what is left of them at least. They are so beautiful, but it is weird to see how much buildings have changed. In one of the pictures, you can the modern day buildings in the background of the ancient buildings.

more...
Kasey Saeturn's curator insight, September 28, 2013 10:10 PM

Never have I heard in history of these Dilmun merchants. They sound like big travelers because who could know the distance from Mesopotamia and the Indus River and knowing that back then there were no cars the distance and time from could be months or even years of travel which is crazy because we get around so easily nowadays and even walking from close distances can be problematic to people of today.

abigail's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:32 PM

mesopotamia forms one part of all the ancient trading that has formed the negociations that all countries have till todays date. 

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Rescooped by Ryley Caron from Archaeology News
Scoop.it!

Bahrain history slowly rises from sands

Bahrain history slowly rises from sands | Mesopotamia History | Scoop.it

More than 4,000 years ago, Dilmun merchants traveled from Mesopotamia to the Indus River, titans of trade and culture before rise of the empires of the Persians or the Ottomans

Over a millennia, the civilization that Dilmun created on the back of trading in pearls, copper and dates as far as South Asia faded into the encroaching sands. It wasn't until an excavation by Danish archaeologists in the 1950s that its past was rediscovered.

Now, with Bahrain in a deepening political crisis between its Sunni rulers and majority Shiite population, the connection to ancient Dilmun is one of the few unifying symbols on the island. It also is a rare and vivid look at pre-Islamic life in a region with few sites celebrating cultures before the time of the Prophet Muhammad.


Via David Connolly
Ryley Caron's insight:

This is amazing how these buildings are still standing, or what is left of them at least. They are so beautiful, but it is weird to see how much buildings have changed. In one of the pictures, you can the modern day buildings in the background of the ancient buildings.

more...
Kasey Saeturn's curator insight, September 28, 2013 10:10 PM

Never have I heard in history of these Dilmun merchants. They sound like big travelers because who could know the distance from Mesopotamia and the Indus River and knowing that back then there were no cars the distance and time from could be months or even years of travel which is crazy because we get around so easily nowadays and even walking from close distances can be problematic to people of today.

abigail's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:32 PM

mesopotamia forms one part of all the ancient trading that has formed the negociations that all countries have till todays date.