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Bahrain history slowly rises from sands

Bahrain history slowly rises from sands | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it

More than 4,000 years ago, Dilmun merchants traveled from Mesopotamia to the Indus River, titans of trade and culture before rise of the empires of the Persians or the Ottomans

Over a millennia, the civilization that Dilmun created on the back of trading in pearls, copper and dates as far as South Asia faded into the encroaching sands. It wasn't until an excavation by Danish archaeologists in the 1950s that its past was rediscovered.

Now, with Bahrain in a deepening political crisis between its Sunni rulers and majority Shiite population, the connection to ancient Dilmun is one of the few unifying symbols on the island. It also is a rare and vivid look at pre-Islamic life in a region with few sites celebrating cultures before the time of the Prophet Muhammad.


Via David Connolly
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

Never have I heard in history of these Dilmun merchants. They sound like big travelers because who could know the distance from Mesopotamia and the Indus River and knowing that back then there were no cars the distance and time from could be months or even years of travel which is crazy because we get around so easily nowadays and even walking from close distances can be problematic to people of today.

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Ryley Caron's curator insight, September 19, 2013 6:17 PM

This is amazing how these buildings are still standing, or what is left of them at least. They are so beautiful, but it is weird to see how much buildings have changed. In one of the pictures, you can the modern day buildings in the background of the ancient buildings.

abigail's curator insight, October 12, 2013 4:32 PM

mesopotamia forms one part of all the ancient trading that has formed the negociations that all countries have till todays date. 

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Cover Story - World Magazine

Cover Story - World Magazine | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
World Magazine
Cover Story
World Magazine
THE SAME ROUTE would be taken by invaders from Mesopotamia against the tribes that descended from Abram (now Abraham): Assyrians captured Samaria in 722 B.C., then Babylonians captured Jerusalem in 597 B.C.
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

Comparing modern day situations to the Mesopotamian Era and how the Mesopotamians have taken the same route and how we've followed within their footsteps to take on the same route.

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Urban Planner: November 20, 2013 - Torontoist

Urban Planner: November 20, 2013 - Torontoist | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
Urban Planner: November 20, 2013 Torontoist History: The name “Mesopotamia” derives from a Greek term meaning “land between the rivers.” The Royal Ontario Museum's latest major exhibit, which opens on June 22, takes this literally, as visitors flow...
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

I think it's interesting that we're interpreting ancient work into our modern day works. We're still giving credit to the old Mesopotamia yet we're also reinventing it in it's our own way. 

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Mesopotamia

Mesopotamia | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
Mesopotamia (from the Greek, meaning 'between two rivers’) was an ancient region in the eastern Mediterranean bounded in the northeast by the Zagros Mountains and in the southeast by the Arabian(...) (Mesopotamia -- Ancient History Encyclopedia
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These sites are so amazing to find new information. This ancient encyclopedia is really helpful. 

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Berkeley Lecture Series Presents: A seminar by Bahram Beyzaie on "Gilgamesh" - Payvand

Berkeley Lecture Series Presents: A seminar by Bahram Beyzaie on "Gilgamesh" - Payvand | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
Berkeley Lecture Series Presents: A seminar by Bahram Beyzaie on "Gilgamesh"
Payvand
The Epic of Gilgamesh: The Epic of Gilgamesh, an epic poem from Mesopotamia, is amongst the earliest surviving works of literature.
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

The fact that there's a seminar based on Gilgamesh is really interesting. You would assume that the history of Mesopotamia is kind of well known but it's good to know that we're still able to be taught about Gilgamesh. 

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Mesopotamia - The British Museum

Mesopotamia - The British Museum | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it

Via David Walp
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

This website in particular of Mesopotamia in The British Museum tells us about the geography of Mesopotamia, Gods, Goddesses, Demons, Monsters. Then it has links that talks about Assyria, Babylonia, and Sumer. It's really interesting. 

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David Walp's curator insight, October 31, 2013 11:56 AM

TERRIFIC website that has tons of information about various themes of Mesopotamian history. You should definitely explore this one.

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The Story of Music, by Howard Goodall – review - The Guardian

The Story of Music, by Howard Goodall – review - The Guardian | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
The Guardian
The Story of Music, by Howard Goodall – review
The Guardian
A Mesopotamian clay tablet dating from 2600 BC gives us the oldest list of musical instruments that we have – and instructions on how to play them.
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

It's amazing how instruments were acknowledged in the Mesopotamian era. The fact that they used clay tablets to write down their work and keep record of it and how it still is readable today. Who would've thought those caly tablets would last so long. 

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A World Food Day for All World Views - Huffington Post

A World Food Day for All World Views - Huffington Post | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
A World Food Day for All World Views
Huffington Post
These writings were found in and around Mesopotamian sites like the ancient city of Ur, home to the Sumerian peoples.
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

In this article the arthor gives attribution to the beginning of agriculture to the Sumerians/Mesopotamia. And his view on this issue just makes me think about how nowadays many people seem to be ungrateful for what they have food wise and they never consider what some don't have. For instance in ancient Mesopotamia everyone had to work hard and farm in order to survive and eat. But nowadays all we have to really do is go to the store to pick something up if we needed it because we have people laboring away to put food onto our tables. 

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THE GREEN MAN AND THE KING OF SALEM - Patheos (blog)

THE GREEN MAN AND THE KING OF SALEM - Patheos (blog) | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
THE GREEN MAN AND THE KING OF SALEM
Patheos (blog)
...
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

Interesting to see the beliefs that came from ancient Mesopotamia and becoming still well known today and was practiced by many eras after.

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Rescooped by Kasey Saeturn from Virology and Bioinformatics from Virology.ca
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PLOS ONE: mtDNA from the Early Bronze Age to the Roman Period Suggests a Genetic Link between the Indian Subcontinent and Mesopotamian Cradle of Civilization

PLOS ONE: mtDNA from the Early Bronze Age to the Roman Period Suggests a Genetic Link between the Indian Subcontinent and Mesopotamian Cradle of Civilization | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it

Abstract

Ancient DNA methodology was applied to analyse sequences extracted from freshly unearthed remains (teeth) of 4 individuals deeply deposited in slightly alkaline soil of the Tell Ashara (ancient Terqa) and Tell Masaikh (ancient Kar-Assurnasirpal) Syrian archaeological sites, both in the middle Euphrates valley. Dated to the period between 2.5 Kyrs BC and 0.5 Kyrs AD the studied individuals carried mtDNA haplotypes corresponding to the M4b1, M49 and/or M61 haplogroups, which are believed to have arisen in the area of the Indian subcontinent during the Upper Paleolithic and are absent in people living today in Syria. However, they are present in people inhabiting today’s Tibet, Himalayas, India and Pakistan. We anticipate that the analysed remains from Mesopotamia belonged to people with genetic affinity to the Indian subcontinent since the distribution of identified ancient haplotypes indicates solid link with populations from the region of South Asia-Tibet (Trans-Himalaya). They may have been descendants of migrants from much earlier times, spreading the clades of the macrohaplogroup M throughout Eurasia and founding regional Mesopotamian groups like that of Terqa or just merchants moving along trade routes passing near or through the region. None of the successfully identified nuclear alleles turned out to be ΔF508 CFTR, LCT-13910T or Δ32 CCR5.


Via Alice Gibbons
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

It's interesting how we can analyze the remains of ancient Mesopotamia people of today. Dating back to Mesopotamia we were able establish that Mesopotamians have an affinity to the Indian subcontient. And being that the time frame is so far off it's amazing how we can even still relate the two and come to a conclusion that these two have an affinity.

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Lamashtu, La-maš-tu, Dimme, Demon Queen, the Mother of Beasts, the Demon Mother

Lamashtu, La-maš-tu, Dimme, Demon Queen, the Mother of Beasts, the Demon Mother | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it

Lamashtu is a hideous she-demonic-vampire in the Akkadian-Babylonian, Mesopotamian folklore...

 

Unlike other demonic entities of Mesopotamian lore, Lamashtu is indicated to have acted of her own volition, not ordered by other beings, signifying that she was probably a demigoddess of her own right...

 

Lamashtu is daughter of Anu...

 

Lamashtu is depicted as a mythological hybrid, with a hairy body, a lioness' head with donkey's teeth and ears, long fingers and fingernails, and the feet of a bird with sharp talons...

 

She is  well known for her bottomless hunger for the little noobs, and often shown standing or kneeling on a donkey, nursing a pig and a dog, and holding snakes.

 

Her herald is the Yethazamari, a winged jackal with a snake’s tail and empty eye sockets that emit smoke...

 

She thus bears some functions and resemblance to the Mesopotamian demon Lilith.

 

Lamashtu herself, while not rehabilitated, has been repackaged in the form of a Dungeons and Dragons character. She’s still evil and chaotic, though...

 

More:

http://bit.ly/WWBzUY

http://bit.ly/mfCt3

http://bit.ly/W7Gdti

http://bit.ly/12SdFd4

http://bit.ly/V8FBV3

http://bit.ly/WKQCNK

http://bit.ly/RkAIKF

 

See Lilith:

http://bit.ly/Z1ftRJ

 

Post Image: http://bit.ly/VE9z1J


Via Mhd.Shadi Khudr
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

I've always been interested in myths and something like this really caught my attention. I had no idea that myths like these existed within those eras. And it's crazy because she's a hybrid that's demonic. And it's scary at the same time.

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The B-52's - Mesopotamia

The B-52's - Mesopotamia - Mesopotamia (1983) (I liked a @YouTube video http://t.co/UIyprZHeU2 The B-52's - Mesopotamia)
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

I think it's interesting how they use the music along with the Mesopotamian images. 

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Ancient glass illuminates ancient societies - Past Horizons Archaeology News (press release)

Ancient glass illuminates ancient societies - Past Horizons Archaeology News (press release) | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
Past Horizons Archaeology News (press release) Ancient glass illuminates ancient societies Past Horizons Archaeology News (press release) The earliest known glass objects of the mid third millennium BCE were beads primarily in Egypt and...
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

I find it amazing how things like glass can be still found and traced back to ancient times. 

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Evolution of the timeless brick - Deccan Herald

Evolution of the timeless brick - Deccan Herald | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
Evolution of the timeless brick
Deccan Herald
Bricks have been faithful building companions, their usage dating back to the Mesopotamian civilisation. Priti Kalra throws light on their history and current trends.
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

I think it's interesting that the usage of bricks dates back to the Mesopotamian Civlization because I do not recall reading anything about bricks. Unless bricks and stones are considered the same thing?

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Cornell University to return 10000 ancient tablets to Iraq - WatertownDailyTimes.com

Cornell University to return 10000 ancient tablets to Iraq - WatertownDailyTimes.com | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
Cornell University to return 10000 ancient tablets to Iraq WatertownDailyTimes.com The 10,000 inscribed clay blocks date from the fourth millennium BC and offer scholars an unmatched record of daily life in ancient Mesopotamia, the cradle of...
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

I find it amazing that Cornell University was able to find ancient tablets that recorded the daily life in ancient Mesopotamia. 

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Open Culture | Hear The Epic of Gilgamesh Read in the Original Akkadian and Enjoy the Sounds of Mesopotamia

Open Culture | Hear The Epic of Gilgamesh Read in the Original Akkadian and Enjoy the Sounds of Mesopotamia | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
I love modern scholarship. I really, really do. From the article:
“ At Cambridge University, Dr. Martin Worthington, an expert in Babylonian and Assyrian grammar, has started recording readings of...

Via Elizabeth E Charles
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

I find this a very interesting thing to read about because who would've thought that there were even people that could actually speak the language of those within the Mesopotamian era. I'm curious as to what the language actually sounds like.

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Photos: Life in Hawizeh Marshes - Payvand

Photos: Life in Hawizeh Marshes - Payvand | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
Photos: Life in Hawizeh Marshes Payvand The Hawizeh marsh is critical to the survival of the Central and Hammar marshes, which also make up the Mesopotamian Marshes, because they are a refuge for species that may recolonize or reproduce into the...
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

I find it interesting how marshes today are still exsistent from the Mesopotamian era. 

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Timeline Photos - How to Love Your Little Monster | Facebook

Timeline Photos - How to Love Your Little Monster | Facebook | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
Clay spheres from Mesopotamia could be the 'very first data storage'~
A lost code used to keep records 200 years before the invention of the written word...
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

Clay sculptures or spheres could be considered the first data storage. I find that really intersting. Who would've thought they'd have a different form of storage before actually implenting the writing. 

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History Bulldozed for Progress

History Bulldozed for Progress | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
Just days after a 1,200 year royal tomb was unearthed in Peru, a nearby pyramid that stood for thousands of years was torn down by property developers.
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

I find it crazy that they would bulldoze a ancient pyramid. It should be something that should still be around for historical purposes yet they destroyed it. Did they at least have archaeologists come by and look at it before they destroyed this ancient piece? 

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Bahrain history slowly rises from sands

Bahrain history slowly rises from sands | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it

More than 4,000 years ago, Dilmun merchants traveled from Mesopotamia to the Indus River, titans of trade and culture before rise of the empires of the Persians or the Ottomans

Over a millennia, the civilization that Dilmun created on the back of trading in pearls, copper and dates as far as South Asia faded into the encroaching sands. It wasn't until an excavation by Danish archaeologists in the 1950s that its past was rediscovered.

Now, with Bahrain in a deepening political crisis between its Sunni rulers and majority Shiite population, the connection to ancient Dilmun is one of the few unifying symbols on the island. It also is a rare and vivid look at pre-Islamic life in a region with few sites celebrating cultures before the time of the Prophet Muhammad.


Via David Connolly
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

Never have I heard in history of these Dilmun merchants. They sound like big travelers because who could know the distance from Mesopotamia and the Indus River and knowing that back then there were no cars the distance and time from could be months or even years of travel which is crazy because we get around so easily nowadays and even walking from close distances can be problematic to people of today.

more...
Ryley Caron's curator insight, September 19, 2013 6:17 PM

This is amazing how these buildings are still standing, or what is left of them at least. They are so beautiful, but it is weird to see how much buildings have changed. In one of the pictures, you can the modern day buildings in the background of the ancient buildings.

abigail's curator insight, October 12, 2013 4:32 PM

mesopotamia forms one part of all the ancient trading that has formed the negociations that all countries have till todays date. 

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Nabu, Nebo

Nabu, Nebo | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it

Nabu is the Mesopotamian (Sumerian and Babylonian; Assyrian, Akkadian) god of wisdom.

 

He is the son of Marduk and Sarpanitu.

 

He invented the art of writing and recorded all knowledge on clay tablets.

 

His ship was known as Iddahedu.

 

Originally, Nabu was a West Semitic deity introduced by the Amorites into Mesopotamia, probably at the same time as Marduk shortly after 2000 BC.

 

While Marduk became Babylon's main deity, Nabu resided in nearby Borsippa in his temple E-zida.

 

He was first called the "scribe and minister of Marduk", later assimilated as Marduk's beloved son from Sarpanitum.

 

During the Babylonian New Year Festival, the cult statue of Nabu was transported from Borsippa to Babylon in order to commune with his father Marduk...

 

In late Babylonian astrology, Nabu was connected with the planet Mercury.

 

As the god of wisdom and writing, he was equated by the Greeks to either Apollo or Hermes, the latter identified by the Romans with their own god Mercury.

 

Nabu is mentioned in the Nevi'im of the Tanakh as Nebo in Isaiah 46:1

 

More:

http://bit.ly/niV34Z

http://bit.ly/RZq5sY

http://bit.ly/QyGNUf

 

See Apollo:

http://bit.ly/SCxwW0

 

Post Image: http://bit.ly/PTf00A


Via Mhd.Shadi Khudr
Kasey Saeturn's insight:

I've always been interested in things like gods and to see that even back in ancient Mesopotamia there were gods that were being worshipped and even later on in history there were other eras that continued on worshipping this god as well.

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