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Discovering China - The Qin Dynasty—China's First Dynasty

The Qin Dynasty from 221 to 206 BC is considered China's first dynasty. Although China did have three ancient dynasties: the Xia, Shang and Zhou, Qin's ruler...

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the Earliest Chinese Writing | Ancient Chinese Culture

the Earliest Chinese Writing | Ancient Chinese Culture | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
The earliest Chinese writing appeared during the Shang Dynasty (1766 B.C - 1050 B.C.) and the earliest form is called the oracle bone script.

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Cindy Garcia's curator insight, November 9, 2013 2:18 AM

In this article,  says the shang dynasty was appeared to be the first writing in the Ancient China.

Keith Mielke's curator insight, February 14, 2014 2:09 PM

As discussed in class bone script was the most common form of writing due to the availability of bones and most of all how common the reading of broken bones to tell the future was. 

Carlee Allen's curator insight, May 17, 2015 10:58 AM

This article talks about the ancient origin of the Chinese language. It was invented by a man who was related to the Yellow Emperor. It also talked about how there was sometimes the same signs for different words, and how the same words even had different sign sometimes. The first Chinese handwriting appeared during the Shang Dynasty.

 

I thought that it was interesting to see the origins of the Chinese language, especially since I have always been fascinated with China and their culture.

Rescooped by Jessica Magana from Mesopotamia
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From Churchill to Assad - Jerusalem Post

From Churchill to Assad - Jerusalem Post | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it

From Churchill to Assad Jerusalem Post In the ancient world Sumerians, Akkadians and Assyrians were fighting among themselves just as today Shi'ites, Sunnis and Kurds do.


Via Eduardo Lage-Otero, Jessica Magana
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Rescooped by Jessica Magana from Archaeology News
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The battle for Egypt’s ancient Roman site, Antinopolis

The battle for Egypt’s ancient Roman site, Antinopolis | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it

Leading archaeologists have denounced the poor state of conservation of the Roman remains at Antinopolis in Egypt, the city built by the emperor Hadrian, who ruled Rome from 117AD to 138AD. The revolution that swept through the country in 2011 and the subsequent exit of its president, Hosni Mubarak, who is currently in jail facing corruption charges, have affected the security and conservations of many historical sights in the country, especially those that are far from major city centres. Antinopolis, located near the Nile over 30km south of the nearest large town, Minya, is a perfect target.

 

Until recently, the Roman hippodrome there was still intact, although it has now been swallowed by the ever-expanding cemetery for the neighbouring small town called Sheikh ‘Ibada. Out of the four hippodromes built by the Romans in Egypt, this was the only one that survived. Large areas are being prepared for redevelopment and parts of the ancient necropolis on the north of the site have already been converted into farmland.

 

Groups of children pass by us, grinning, armed with spades with which they dig out artefacts and sell them. People don’t like our presence here


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Rescooped by Jessica Magana from Egyptology and Archaeology
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Carbon dating shows ancient Egypt's rapid expansion - life - 04 September 2013 - New Scientist

Carbon dating shows ancient Egypt's rapid expansion - life - 04 September 2013 - New Scientist | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
Ancient Egypt, the prototype state, became a powerful civilisation surprisingly fast, according to radiocarbon dating that sets the first solid chronology

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ARCE-NOLA's curator insight, September 4, 2013 1:27 PM

A new study shows that development towards a state in Predynastic Egypt was rapid (Note that, contrary to many reports, the dates indicated by this new study are not "new."  Instead, this study seems to confirm the dates already understood from other archaeological work.)  Also beware of other news summaries, as many have misinterpreted the report's findings.

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Ancient art fills in Egypt's ecological history

Ancient art fills in Egypt's ecological history | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it

Mammal populations shrank during three abrupt climate shifts over the past 6,000 years.

Ancient Egyptian rock inscriptions and carvings on pharaonic tombs chronicle hartebeest and oryx — horned beasts that thrived in the region more than 6,000 years ago. Researchers have now shown that those mammal populations became unstable in concert with significant shifts in Egypt’s climate.

The finding is based on a fresh interpretation of an archaeological and palaeontological record of ancient Egyptian mammals pieced together more than a decade ago by the zoologist Dale Osborn1. Thirty-eight large-bodied mammals existed in Egypt roughly six millennia ago, compared to just eight species today.

“There are interesting stories buried in the data — at the congruence of the artistic and written record,” says Justin Yeakel, an ecologist at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, British Columbia, who presented the research this week at the annual meeting of the Ecological Society of America in Minneapolis, Minnesota. For example, the philosopher Aristotle said 2,300 years ago that lions were present, though rare, in Greece; shortly thereafter, the beasts appeared in the local art record for the last time, Yeakel says.


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Lucero Trejo Guerrero's curator insight, October 18, 2013 11:34 PM

Egyptain art from about 6000 years ago that has carving of mammals, that are on rocks and tombs. These are mammals that seem to have died and not last long due to the shift of Egyptian climate. The only proved that these mammals once lived are the pieces of art that the Egyptians have left.

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Step back to ancient Egypt in Niagara Falls

Step back to ancient Egypt in Niagara Falls | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
Museum playing host to ROM exhibit

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ARCE-NOLA's curator insight, September 13, 2013 11:06 AM

Exhibit from the ROM in Toronto comes to Niagra Falls.

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First-graders and Mesopotamia? New York's model lesson plan asks too much ... - Syracuse.com

First-graders and Mesopotamia? New York's model lesson plan asks too much ... - Syracuse.com | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
First-graders and Mesopotamia? New York's model lesson plan asks too much ...
Syracuse.com
Or explain the significance of gods and goddesses, ziggurats, temples and priests in Mesopotamia?
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Lindsay's Shang Dynasty Blog Spot: Shang Dynasty Used Bronze

Lindsay's Shang Dynasty Blog Spot: Shang Dynasty Used Bronze | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
The Chang Dynasty was around during the Bronze Age. The people learned to use bronze in different ways to improve their lives. The Shang people used molds to create item out of bronze. The technique was called ...

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Keith Mielke's curator insight, February 14, 2014 2:07 PM

It is amazing how all the way back in the Shang Dynasty people were mixing metals together to form a stronger metal bronze.

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Zhang Chi and Hsiao-chun Hung - Jiahu 1: earliest farmers beyond the Yangtze River

Zhang Chi and Hsiao-chun Hung - Jiahu 1: earliest farmers beyond the Yangtze River | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it

The authors summarise the latest evidence for the introduction of rice cultivation into northern China, and show that it most probably began there in the early seventh millennium BC as a result of influence or migration from the Yangtze Valley


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Dorian Q Fuller's curator insight, March 3, 2013 6:17 AM

I am too busy on other work to provide a full blog on this now, but I will in due course. Unfortunately this paper is highly mis-leading, and once again Jiahu is the centre of rather selective communication that claims to resolves the origins of rice agriculture but relies on a certain amount slight of hand that obscures  the actual data. First the paper slectively picks data from the ealiest levels from the Peking University excavations at Baligang together with the ragtag data from a couple of excavation campaings at Jiahu (in a different river valley). First, as to the photo seen here, these are storage pits and houses of the Third Millennium BC, Qiujialing/Shijiahe/Longshan period, which is the focus of that site. So the authors have selected misleading photo that has nothing to do with the few lower contexts from which the rice and acorn remains discussed in the paper come. The rice data, itself is unpbulished, but in this paper it relies on an student dissertation (a  very good) which focused on the Qiujialing/Shijiahe/Longshan and Yangshao period, which in a footnote mentioned some preliminary data on sikelet bases from the 7th millennium BC lower levels. That is actually a personal communication from me and Dr. Qin Ling, on the bais of a preliminary sort of one early sample after it came out of the ground in 2008. The very precise precentages given are prone to revisions once the full analysis of the lower levels are finished. In terms of using the data from Jiahu, there are three sets of archaeobotanical data which are mixed in this paper in selective way. First there is the 1999 monograph on earlier excavations, from which comments on rice and the presence of wild foods in quoted. Later informed comments and discussions of this material (such as Fuller et al 2007 in Antiquity, are carefully avoided, as they suggest this maerial is entirely consistent with wild rice gathering from a range of wild rice species or populations). In absence of spikelet bases from Jiahu we simply do not know how much of this rice might have been cultivated and how gathered wild: the grain morpholoigal diversity tends to point towards wild gathering at least some of this. Second, there are the only systematic samples, collected by wet-sieving by Zhao Zhijun. These rightly provided some quantified data on the present of rice versus other foods and some possible weeds. It should be noted that none of the weeds is exclusively diagnostic of either cultivation nor wet rice. (e.g. Digitaria is typically a dry millet weed, but does occur in early rice cultivation as well). Indeed this site shows rice as a co-staple with acorns and Trapa, much as we see in amongst early cultivators in the Yangtze. Zhao's grain metrics, largely overlap the small grains from the 1999 excavation report, but these too are left out. Third there are grain metrics from the later (2004) excavations.that came not through flotation but from hand collecting and coarse screening, which were published by Liu et al in The Holocene 2007 as a critique of the 1999 measurement. (Collection methods could bias these otwards large sizes.) This measurements are quoted here, but mis-quotes, as they actually show size reduction over time-- a trend more inline with wild rice adapting to changing climate than a domestication process. The problem is all these set of measurements are real and should be taken together. They indicate no clear trend in size change but instead a huge spread of metrical diversity. Unfortunately, apart from those readers who have been through the Chinese monogrpahs and dissertations and know the unpublished material from Baligang, this paper may well mislead as well as inform on the earliest rice farmers!

Dorian Q Fuller's curator insight, March 3, 2013 6:20 AM

Another selective and incomplete use of the Jiahu data, coupled with contemporary Baligang, which is in a different river valley, and lacked enough ceramics reconsruct a single vessel. Is early Baliganag really the same culture at Jiahu? Is Baligang derived from a migration from the Yangtze as the authors contend? Is there even evidence that Jiahu is an immigrant farming culturwe from the Yangtze? No! There is no evidence really in favour of this, only a dogmatic belief tht rice should have a single centre of origin and dispersal by migration.

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Ancient Egyptian jewellery carved from a meteorite

Ancient Egyptian jewellery carved from a meteorite | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
The raw material for a 5300-year-old iron necklace bead found in an Egyptian tomb has revealed itself to have fallen to Earth in a meteorite

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Scientists Rewrite Timeline of Ancient Egypt's First Dynasty | Archaeology | Sci-News.com

Scientists Rewrite Timeline of Ancient Egypt's First Dynasty | Archaeology | Sci-News.com | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
British archaeologists led by Dr Michael Dee have been able for the first time to set a robust timeline for the first eight kings of ancient Egypt.

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Rescooped by Jessica Magana from Cartography
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From Churchill to Assad - Jerusalem Post

From Churchill to Assad - Jerusalem Post | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it

From Churchill to Assad Jerusalem Post In the ancient world Sumerians, Akkadians and Assyrians were fighting among themselves just as today Shi'ites, Sunnis and Kurds do.


Via Eduardo Lage-Otero
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Rescooped by Jessica Magana from Egyptology and Archaeology
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Hair offering in Ancient Egypt. Archaeological remains.

Hair offering in Ancient Egypt. Archaeological remains. | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
Iconography and texts point to an Egyptian funerary custom of shaving or cutting a piece of hair to the two mourners in the role of Isis and Nephtys. But, does the archaeology say something to us? ...

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ARCE-NOLA's curator insight, September 11, 2013 12:31 PM

An interesting look at evidence for mourners in ancient Egypt having cut or shaved their hair.

Natalie Letcher's curator insight, September 18, 2013 6:38 PM
Natalie Letcher's insight:

Food, gold, shabti, every good & clean thing, a heart that is balanced with Ma'at, blessings of the divine for the hereafter...and to be at our best, one might also need some hair :)

Kristine Rapisura's curator insight, January 25, 2014 2:36 AM

Shows a great example on how Egyptians believed in the after life and how rituals were very important to their every day lifestyle. 

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Egypt's Junta Has Nothing to Los By Melkulangara Bhadrakumar

 

The appointment of Robert Ford as the new American ambassador to Egypt was indeed an ominous sign that the Obama administration expected civil war conditions to arise in Egypt. Ford’s forte during his hugely successful “diplomatic’ assignment in Baghdad in the middle of the last decade was to organize the notorious death squads, which tore Mesopotamia apart and destroyed Iraq almost irreparably.

Equally, Ford played a seminal role in his subsequent ambassadorial assignment in Damascus in 2011 in successfully triggering the Syrian civil war. Ford is the living embodiment of the stunning reality that between the George W. Bush and Barack Obama administrations, there has been no real shift in the United States’ policies in the Middle East aimed at perpetuating its regional hegemony.

Make no mistake about it that the US game plan is to destabilize and destroy Egypt just the same way Iraq and Syria have been destroyed so that Israel’s absolute security is assured in the region for the conceivable future. 

This is the conclusion that can be safely drawn as the Egyptian junta launched the mass murder of hundreds of Egyptian protestors on Wednesday. A bloodbath of horrendous proportions has commenced in Egypt. 


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Kevin Kaatz's comment, September 9, 2013 11:39 AM
I'm not sure how this is related to ancient Mesopotamia...
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Mesopotamian Marshlands Declared Iraq's First National Park | Environment News Service

Mesopotamian Marshlands Declared Iraq's First National Park | Environment News Service | Mesopotamia | Scoop.it
%environment_news_service%

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Kevin Kaatz's comment, September 9, 2013 11:39 AM
I'm not sure how this is related to ancient Mesopotamia...