Diagrammatic Languages and Programming
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Diagrammatic Languages and Programming
Cognitive Science and Philosophy of Embodied Cognition. Promotes Embodied Cognition concepts and technology in art, education, work and research. The HCI technology is focused on Computer Music and Programming. Also promotes 'neurodiversity' and proposes technologies and strategies to foster very different ways of thinking. Content on pg 2 is focused on interfaces and programmatic music while pg 1 focuses on the conceptual foundations. (2012-present)
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Tomorrow's Musical Instruments Look Like Lightsabers and Metal Detectors

Tomorrow's Musical Instruments Look Like Lightsabers and Metal Detectors | Diagrammatic Languages and Programming | Scoop.it
The Bela is a result of the lab’s experimentation into “hackable” musical instruments. “With Bela, it’s more about giving people the chance to make their own instruments,” Giulio Moro, one of the lab’s researchers, explained.

Bela is a self-contained audio processing platform, or a one-stop shop for translating code into sound, developed collaboratively by several researchers in the lab. They pride themselves on Bela’s minimal latency (the delay between playing and hearing a sound), and its extreme portability. The device is the size of a deck of cards, and doesn’t need to be hooked up to a computer to produce sound.
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Arduinome: An Arduino-Based Monome Clone, Behind the Scenes

Arduinome: An Arduino-Based Monome Clone, Behind the Scenes | Diagrammatic Languages and Programming | Scoop.it
Create digital music, motion, and more.
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DIY monome with arduino
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Computer Music Research

Computer Music Research | Diagrammatic Languages and Programming | Scoop.it
neuroscience of music, biomusicology, eeg, university of Plymouth, Plymouth centre for computer music research, brain-computer interface, BCI, music, computer music, acousmatic
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Remidi T8

The T8 is a wearable device that turns your hand into a whole new musical instrument: designed for Players, Djs and Vjs. Combining motion and pressure o
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▶ DJ Fresh & Mindtunes: A track created only by the mind (Documentary)

Share your videos with friends, family, and the world
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I guess something to take from this is empowering the physically disabled. It could also be useful for people with a lot to say that have difficulty expressing themselves verbally and with body language

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Flow. An intuitive & precise wireless controller.

Flow. An intuitive & precise wireless controller. | Diagrammatic Languages and Programming | Scoop.it

"We work on graphic design, video editing or CAD on a daily basis. Keyboard and mouse are great but they are far from giving you the same sensitivity and abilities as your hand. The same applies for music, browsing or presentations. We need a tool that gives us flexible shortcuts and perfect control, a tool that makes the things we love fast, precise, intuitive and fun. 

That's why we created Flow, a freely programmable wireless controller."

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similar to powerMate

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▶ Volumetric Society of NYC - OpenBCI: Crowd-Sourcing Brain Research & Innovation - YouTube

▶ Volumetric Society of NYC - OpenBCI: Crowd-Sourcing Brain Research & Innovation - YouTube | Diagrammatic Languages and Programming | Scoop.it
On December 16 2013 the Volumetric Society of NYC hosted New York EEG researchers/Parsons instructors Joel Murphy and Conor Russomanno presenting OpenBCI, An...
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Meet the Techno-Collagist Who Turns Lasers and Human Limbs into Instruments: Sound Builders

"Adriano goes on to explore the relationship between body, sensors and sound by showing us how a piezo contact microphone can be used to transform any piece of backyard junk into a percussive and melodic instrument. Some people call it physical modeling synthesis but we just call it pretty much amazing.

Adriano's objective is clear: to create a new kinesthetic approach to sound design that totally flips our notion that music is made from a traditional instrument or from interfacing with your mouse, keyboard and screen. This kind of research in tactile, computer music embodiment is not only important for reimagining our conventional vision of an instrument, but also for cutting in half the frustration from wanting to perform in front of millions but having no idea how to play a single note."

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Tongueduino: Hackable, High-bandwidth Sensory Augmentation

Gershon Dublon & Joseph A. Paradiso Responsive Environments Group | MIT Media Lab The tongue is known to have an extremely dense sensing resolution, as well ...
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yum... Data

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PLOS ONE: Towards a Naturalistic Brain-Machine Interface: Hybrid Torque and Position Control Allows Generalization to Novel Dynamics

PLOS ONE: Towards a Naturalistic Brain-Machine Interface: Hybrid Torque and Position Control Allows Generalization to Novel Dynamics | Diagrammatic Languages and Programming | Scoop.it

PLOS ONE: "Realization of reaching and grasping movements by a paralytic person or an amputee would greatly facilitate her/his activities of daily living. Towards this goal, control of a computer cursor or robotic arm using neural signals has been demonstrated in rodents, non-human primates and humans. This technology is commonly referred to as a Brain-Machine Interface (BMI) and is achieved by predictions of kinematic parameters, e.g. position or velocity. However, execution of natural movements, such as swinging baseball bats of different weights at the same speed, requires advanced planning for necessary context-specific forces in addition to kinematic control. Here we show, for the first time, the control of a virtual arm with representative inertial parameters using real-time neural control of torques in non-human primates (M. radiata). We found that neural control of torques leads to ballistic, possibly more naturalistic movements than position control alone, and that adding the influence of position in a hybrid torque-position control changes the feedforward behavior of these BMI movements."

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Physicists Build Laser Tweezers Controlled with Kinect | MIT Technology Review

Physicists Build Laser Tweezers Controlled with Kinect | MIT Technology Review | Diagrammatic Languages and Programming | Scoop.it
Now you can pick up and move micrometre-scale particles using your hands and arms thanks to a Kinect-controlled device called HoloHands...
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Minority Report arrives with Oblong (Part I) -- Mind blowing computer/human interface

This is cool stuff. John Underkoffler, chief scientist, Oblong Industries, was the tech advice behind the film "Minority Report" and then he built his own co...
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monome

monome | Diagrammatic Languages and Programming | Scoop.it

"we seek less complex, more versatile tools: accessible yet fundamentally adaptable. we believe these parameters are most directly achieved through minimalistic design, enabling users to more quickly discover new ways to work, play, and connect. we see flexibility not as a feature but as a foundation."

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looks like an autonoma. what a marvelous appearance.

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NIME, New Interfaces for Musical Expression

The International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression gathers researchers and musicians from all over the world to share their knowledge and ...
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many of the shapes and limitations of our established musical interfaces no longer apply. the interface is now completely decoupled from the music, whose richest future, i believe lies in lambda calculus 

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New Interfaces for Musical Expression

New Interfaces for Musical Expression | Diagrammatic Languages and Programming | Scoop.it

"The International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression gathers researchers and musicians from all over the world to share their knowledge and late-breaking work on new musical interface design. The conference started out as a workshop at the Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI) in 2001. Since then, an annual series of international conferences have been held around the world, hosted by research groups dedicated to interface design, human-computer interaction, and computer music."

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remidi-pro glove controller

remidi-pro glove controller | Diagrammatic Languages and Programming | Scoop.it
The T8 is the first wearable midi-controller that turns your whole hand
into music by playing infinite combinations of notes and sounds. music midi
glove hand pressure sensors wearable device technology app social iot
fabric kickstarter play compose melodies remidi-pro remidi guanto startup
suono sensori wearable device
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MIT Whiz Wants to Turn Your Skin Into a Computer Interface | Wired Design | Wired.com

MIT Whiz Wants to Turn Your Skin Into a Computer Interface | Wired Design | Wired.com | Diagrammatic Languages and Programming | Scoop.it
Lynette Jones is trying to create interfaces that pump spatial information directly onto our hides.
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People with autism and learning disabilities excel in creative thinking (The Guardian)

People with autism and learning disabilities excel in creative thinking (The Guardian) | Diagrammatic Languages and Programming | Scoop.it
A new study showing that people with autism display higher levels of creativity has been welcomed by campaigners, who say it helps debunk a myth about people with learning disabilities.

Scientists found that people with the developmental condition were far more likely to come up with unique answers to creative problems despite having traits that can be socially crippling and make it difficult to find jobs. The co-author of the study, Dr Catherine Best from the University of Stirling, said that while the results, from a study of 312 people, were a measure of just one aspect of the creative process, it revealed a link between autistic traits and unusual and original ideas.

“We speculate that it may be because they are approaching things very differently. It goes a way towards explaining how some people with what is often characterised as a disability exhibit superior creative talents in some domains.”

Though some celebrities, including actress Daryl Hannah, have spoken about their autism, the findings – published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders – should act as a wake-up call to the creative industries, said actor Cian Binchy, who is performing his much-praised show The Misfit Analysis at the Edinburgh festival this week. “There just aren’t any people with learning disabilities – in this field I’m the only one. It’s because people with learning disabilities may need a bit of extra support, and a lot of theatre companies and performers can’t be bothered – its too challenging for them.
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not a great study, but the overall idea is important

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A Direct Brain-to-Brain Interface in Humans

A Direct Brain-to-Brain Interface in Humans | Diagrammatic Languages and Programming | Scoop.it

"We describe the first direct brain-to-brain interface in humans and present results from experiments involving six different subjects. Our non-invasive interface, demonstrated originally in August 2013, combines electroencephalography (EEG) for recording brain signals with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for delivering information to the brain. We illustrate our method using a visuomotor task in which two humans must cooperate through direct brain-to-brain communication to achieve a desired goal in a computer game. The brain-to-brain interface detects motor imagery in EEG signals recorded from one subject (the “sender”) and transmits this information over the internet to the motor cortex region of a second subject (the “receiver”). This allows the sender to cause a desired motor response in the receiver (a press on a touchpad) via TMS. We quantify the performance of the brain-to-brain interface in terms of the amount of information transmitted as well as the accuracies attained in (1) decoding the sender’s signals, (2) generating a motor response from the receiver upon stimulation, and (3) achieving the overall goal in the cooperative visuomotor task. Our results provide evidence for a rudimentary form of direct information transmission from one human brain to another using non-invasive means."

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Introducing the Leap Motion

Leap Motion represents an entirely new way to interact with your computers. It's more accurate than a mouse, as reliable as a keyboard and more sensitive tha...
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Bright future for gesture based computing

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Temporary Tattoos Could Make Electronic Telepathy, Telekinesis Possible

Temporary Tattoos Could Make Electronic Telepathy, Telekinesis Possible | Diagrammatic Languages and Programming | Scoop.it

"Temporary electronic tattoos could soon help people fly drones with only thought and talk seemingly telepathically without speech over smartphones"

 

"His team is developing wireless flexible electronics one can apply on the forehead just like temporary tattoos to read brain activity.

“We want something we can use in the coffee shop to have fun,” Coleman says.

The devices are less than 100 microns thick, the average diameter of a human hair. They consist of circuitry embedded in a layer or rubbery polyester that allow them to stretch, bend and wrinkle. They are barely visible when placed on skin, making them easy to conceal from others."

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Neuroprosthesis Gives Rats the Ability to “Touch” Infrared Light | Laboratory of Dr. Miguel Nicolelis

Neuroprosthesis Gives Rats the Ability to “Touch” Infrared Light | Laboratory of Dr. Miguel Nicolelis | Diagrammatic Languages and Programming | Scoop.it

"Here we show that adult rats can learn to perceive otherwise invisible infrared light through a neuroprosthesis that couples the output of a head-mounted infrared sensor to their somatosensory cortex (S1) via intracortical microstimulation. Rats readily learn to use this new information source, and generate active exploratory strategies to discriminate among infrared sources in their environment."

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Conscious Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans Using Non-Invasive Technologies (PLOS | ONE)

Conscious Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans Using Non-Invasive Technologies (PLOS | ONE) | Diagrammatic Languages and Programming | Scoop.it

"Human sensory and motor systems provide the natural means for the exchange of information between individuals, and, hence, the basis for human civilization. The recent development of brain-computer interfaces (BCI) has provided an important element for the creation of brain-to-brain communication systems, and precise brain stimulation techniques are now available for the realization of non-invasive computer-brain interfaces (CBI). These technologies, BCI and CBI, can be combined to realize the vision of non-invasive, computer-mediated brain-to-brain (B2B) communication between subjects (hyperinteraction). Here we demonstrate the conscious transmission of information between human brains through the intact scalp and without intervention of motor or peripheral sensory systems. Pseudo-random binary streams encoding words were transmitted between the minds of emitter and receiver subjects separated by great distances, representing the realization of the first human brain-to-brain interface. In a series of experiments, we established internet-mediated B2B communication by combining a BCI based on voluntary motor imagery-controlled electroencephalographic (EEG) changes with a CBI inducing the conscious perception of phosphenes (light flashes) through neuronavigated, robotized transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), with special care taken to block sensory (tactile, visual or auditory) cues. Our results provide a critical proof-of-principle demonstration for the development of conscious B2B communication technologies. More fully developed, related implementations will open new research venues in cognitive, social and clinical neuroscience and the scientific study of consciousness. We envision that hyperinteraction technologies will eventually have a profound impact on the social structure of our civilization and raise important ethical issues."

 

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not really as cool as it sounds...

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Perceiving invisible light through a somatosensory cortical prosthesis

Sensory neuroprostheses show great potential for alleviating major sensory deficits. It is not known, however, whether such devices can augment the subject’s normal perceptual range. Here we show that adult rats can learn to perceive otherwise invisible infrared light through a neuroprosthesis that couples the output of a head-mounted infrared sensor to their somatosensory cortex (S1) via intracortical microstimulation. Rats readily learn to use this new information source, and generate active exploratory strategies to discriminate among infrared signals in their environment. S1 neurons in these infrared-perceiving rats respond to both whisker deflection and intracortical microstimulation, suggesting that the infrared representation does not displace the original tactile representation. Hence, sensory cortical prostheses, in addition to restoring normal neurological functions, may serve to expand natural perceptual capabilities in mammals.

 

Perceiving invisible light through a somatosensory cortical prosthesis
• Eric E. Thomson, Rafael Carra & Miguel A.L. Nicolelis

Nature Communications 4, Article number: 1482 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms2497


Via Complexity Digest
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