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Study: Poverty Influences Children’s Early Brain Development

Study: Poverty Influences Children’s Early Brain Development | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it
A new study links poverty with slower early brain development. According to the study, children of low-income families have slower rates of growth in a number of areas, including two key parts of the brain.

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson, Carol Simeone Dip LC (Inst LC)
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Linking poverty with slow early grown brain development.

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JH Tan's curator insight, January 20, 2014 5:28 AM

After reading this article i was shock to find out how poverty influences children's early brian development. This is because environmental factors that contribute to slower brain development often come with poverty, such as poor nutrition, a lack of sleep, an unsafe environment, and a lack of books and educational toys.i think that the goverment should do something about this issuse so that every child would have a equally haed start in life

Davina De Laure's curator insight, January 26, 2014 8:29 AM

this is my insight

i was shock to find out how poverty influences children's early brian development. This is because environmental factors that contribute to slower brain development often come with poverty, such as poor nutrition, a lack of sleep, an unsafe environment, and a lack of books and educational toys.i think that the goverment should do something about this issuse so that every child would have a equally head start in life. seeing child suffering due to lack of resorces makes me think that i should be lucky to have a place to study and have a family that is well to do and also have books to study and we can also make a differance for this children by donating books that we have used instead of throwing it donating money clothes etc

Ann Tan's comment, February 3, 2014 12:18 AM
After reading this article, I think that the main factor which is hindering the children living in poverty is the environment they lived in.Children living in poverty lacked resources such as writing materials and books. Children do not have the basic materials a normal child needs. Children living in poverty have lack of nutrition, a shortage of sleep, an unsafe environment and a lack of books which results in a slower brain developmentParents could not afford to send their kids to school. Also, parents living in poverty are not highly educated too, hence, parents would be the greatest influence to children at the young age. I think that the government should set up free school for children living in poverty or poverty would be passed down from generations to generations with no education as it is very important. After reading this article, I think we should all be grateful and cherish what we have and how fortunate we are to have education.
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The Silent Tsunami: Mental Health in the Workplace

The Silent Tsunami: Mental Health in the Workplace | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it
Mental health issues impact productivity and profitability...

Via Color-Art, Just Mind
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Just Mind's curator insight, February 18, 2014 1:17 PM

Mental health has a huge impact on the workplace and billions in productivity are lost due to people not seeking help that need it. Why don't more companies make this a priority?

Just Mind's curator insight, March 7, 2014 10:24 AM

Stress, depression, and anxiety affect workers performance and people will miss more work days due to these factors. The total economic burden of depression in 2000 was $83 billion on the US economy. The more we support these issues in the workplace, the more productive we will be! Happier workers make for more productive workers.

Amy Hurd's curator insight, March 17, 2014 11:17 AM

mental health in the workplace

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As Suicide Rates Rise, Scientists Find New Warning Signs

As Suicide Rates Rise, Scientists Find New Warning Signs | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it
Computer algorithms, biomarkers and other advanced techniques help flag trouble earlier.
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U.S. Military Lessens Stigma of Mental Illness, Promotes Treatment

U.S. Military Lessens Stigma of Mental Illness, Promotes Treatment | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it
An independent study by the RAND Corporation discovers the U.S. Department of Defense has made progress in reducing the stigma associated with seeking help for mental illness.
Via Lee M Stillerman, PhD
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Online Psychotherapy Gains Fans And Raises Privacy Concerns - NPR (blog)

Online Psychotherapy Gains Fans And Raises Privacy Concerns - NPR (blog) | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it
NPR (blog) Online Psychotherapy Gains Fans And Raises Privacy Concerns NPR (blog) Lauren Kay has never met her therapist in person. The 24-year-old entrepreneur found it difficult to take time off work for appointments.
Via Lee M Stillerman, PhD
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What Buddhism and Psychotherapy Are Learning From Each Other - Huffington Post

What Buddhism and Psychotherapy Are Learning From Each Other - Huffington Post | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it
What Buddhism and Psychotherapy Are Learning From Each Other Huffington Post Today the main site of interaction within the West is not Judeo-Christianity but psychology, a conversation that has led to innovative types of psychotherapy and, most...
Via Lee M Stillerman, PhD
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Mental health cuts cost NHS millions

Mental health cuts cost NHS millions | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it

Cuts to mental health care are costing the NHS millions of pounds long-term, a report has said. More cases of psychosis and schizophrenia now end up in hospital rather than being treated in the community, it said.

Rethink Mental Illness published the report with the London School of Economics.


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Mental health care in the US needs a check-up - Washington Post

Mental health care in the US needs a check-up - Washington Post | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it

Mental health care in the US needs a check-up Washington Post Nearly 23 million Americans live with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.


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Just Mind's curator insight, April 17, 2014 1:59 PM
I agree there need to be more resources but I wonder about the efficacy and effectiveness of this bill. It is lumping together mental health issues that are each very different. My hope is more states will follow a model that includes more "non crisis care" so there are layers of care outside of "hospitalized" or not. Also, it would help if the hospitals didn't blend populations of mentally ill in treatment groups. People with severe anxiety typically don't blend well in treatment groups with people struggling with homelessness and schizophrenia, as an example. This also adds a stigma to reaching out for help when people need it.
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Mental Illness Not a Driving Force Behind Crime: Study - US News

Mental Illness Not a Driving Force Behind Crime: Study - US News | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it
Few crimes committed by mentally ill patients were directly linked to symptoms, researcher notes
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Stress Affects Sperm RNA In Mice | I Fucking Love Science

Stress Affects Sperm RNA In Mice | I Fucking Love Science | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it
A new study, published in Nature Neuroscience, has shown that traumatic experiences early in the life of mice alters the expression of small RNAs in the sperm.
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Mental Health: Five Ways to Improve It - Guardian Liberty Voice

Mental Health: Five Ways to Improve It - Guardian Liberty Voice | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it

Guardian Liberty Voice Mental Health: Five Ways to Improve It Guardian Liberty Voice Mental Health Who does not want to be in the best mental health possible?


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Addressing the Issue of Mental Health on College Campuses - Huffington Post

Addressing the Issue of Mental Health on College Campuses - Huffington Post | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it

Addressing the Issue of Mental Health on College Campuses Huffington Post Colgate University, a small liberal arts college in the Northeast where the temperatures were routinely twenty below zero, deals with their own mental and physical health...


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Effects of Stress on Memory and Cognitive Functions - Care2.com

Effects of Stress on Memory and Cognitive Functions - Care2.com | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it

Care2.com Effects of Stress on Memory and Cognitive Functions Care2.com Memory and other cognitive processes can gradually diminish as many grow older, but research in the last several decades shows those who experience persistent or high levels of...


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Mindfulness - infographic...

Mindfulness - infographic... | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it
Mindfulness Infographic. Practice it and see the difference.

Via craig daniels, Lee M Stillerman, PhD
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Beautiful graphic about the benefits of mindfulness meditation.

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craig daniels's curator insight, March 25, 2014 9:48 AM

A very well done infographic about mindfulness... check it out.


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Gun Laws Associated With Lower Suicide Rates

Gun Laws Associated With Lower Suicide Rates | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it
A new study found that four gun laws are associated with lower rates of firearm suicide and lower overall rates of suicide as well.
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Study: Substance Abuse Treatment Cuts Violence Risk In Severely Mentally Ill

Study: Substance Abuse Treatment Cuts Violence Risk In Severely Mentally Ill | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it
"A new study suggests treating the substance abuse problems of those with severe mental illness can reduce their risk of future violence."
Via Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home
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Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home's curator insight, October 6, 2014 10:32 AM


PsychCentral reports that a study by Yue Zhuo,  Clara M. Bradizza, and  Stephen A. Maisto, conducted under the auspices of the University of Buffalo, found that substance abuse is a stronger predictor of violence than severe mental illness and that  treating the substance abuse disorders in  dually diagnosed patients illness can reduce their risk of future violence.


These researchers identified 278  patients of a publicly-funded community mental health center in Buffalo, New York who were diagnosed with both a severe mental illness (a schizophrenia-spectrum or bipolar disorder) and a substance use disorder. These subjects not only met criteria for current alcohol dependence (97%) or alcohol abuse (3%) but also  had high rates of comorbid drug use disorders. 86% met  DSM-IV criteria  for at least one drug use disorder (76% cocaine abuse/dependence, 46% marijuana, 23% opiates, 16% sedatives/hypnotics and 9% amphetamines) in addition to their alcohol use disorder.  Investigators followed these subjects over a 6-month period following their admission to an outpatient dual diagnosis treatment program.  Data obtained from these subjects was then  then analyzed to  study the association between subjects' attendance at treatment and subsequent displays of aggression.


For the purposes of this study, "treatment utilization was defined as the number of days during the first 4 months following treatment enrollment that participants either received outpatient treatment and/or were in attendance at a self-help group meeting (e.g., Alcoholic Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous,  or Double Trouble in Recovery)." Aggression was assessed by querying subjects monthly  about how often the following events happened as a result of their drinking or drug use:  (a)  arguments with family and friends; (b) physical fights when under the influence; (c) arrests due to behavior when they were drunk or high; (d) infliction of injury to someone else; and (e) damage to  property or breaking things. These questions, along with assessments  of drug and alcohol use and treatment utilization were administered for the previous 12 months at baseline and monthly after the initiation of the study.


Analyses revealed that dual diagnosis treatment was associated with lower levels of subsequent aggression. However, a thorough examination of the data held some surprises for the investigators. 

 They observed that, "In our model, severity of psychiatric symptoms did not predict severity of later aggression; instead, aggression was more closely associated with severity of substance use " and thorough analyses of data indicated that "greater treatment involvement was associated with reduced substance use, which was associated with lower levels of aggression".  The research team concluded that "substance use was found to mediate the relationship between dual diagnosis treatment and aggression" and that "targeting substance use reduction in treatment may have the additional benefit of reducing the risk of later aggression among dual diagnosis patients."


Dawn Stary's curator insight, October 6, 2014 1:20 PM

Most individuals with #mentalIllness are non-violent; however, we have seen over and over again that some persons with mental illnesses can be violent and devastatingly so.  We should, as a society, take all steps to demystify mental illness and address the root problems of it but it makes sense to also address the substance abuse that can be coupled with mental illness; especially if it can decrease violence. 

Ziggi Ivan Santini's curator insight, October 25, 2014 10:55 AM

"Treatment programs should include interventions that are likely to decrease substance abuse, as this may provide the additional benefit of reducing the risk of later aggression among dual-diagnosis patients. This not only improves the lives of affected individuals and their families, but also provides a safer environment for society as a whole.”

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People with mental illness face legal discrimination - USA TODAY

People with mental illness face legal discrimination - USA TODAY | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it
USA TODAY People with mental illness face legal discrimination USA TODAY Stigma against the mentally ill is so powerful that it's been codified for 50 years into federal law, and few outside the mental health system even realize it.
Via Lee M Stillerman, PhD
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Medpage Today: Opioid, Heroin Deaths Continue to Climb

Medpage Today: Opioid, Heroin Deaths Continue to Climb | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it
“Overdose deaths from both prescription opioids and heroin continued to rise in 2011, the most recent year for which data were available, according to the CDC.”
Via Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home
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Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home's curator insight, July 2, 2014 8:41 AM


Figures just released by the CDC about opiod-related deaths in 2011 (the most recent year for which data are available) indicate that "While prescription opioid deaths followed a more than decade-long trend and increased about 2% to 16,917, heroin deaths jumped by 44% -- from 3,036 in 2010 to 4,397."


The Medpage report indicates that the CDC believes the increase in heroin deaths is partly due to users having less access to prescription painkillers and thus, switching to heroin, which is cheaper and more readily available. It also cites remarks by Dr. Andrew Kolodny, Chief Medical Officer of Phoenix House, a national addiction treatment organization  who responded to the spike  in heroin deaths by saying:


"I see this as all the same problem,  an epidemic of people addicted to opioids,  Treatment has to be easier to access than pills or heroin."

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Physical Effects of Sleep Deprivation - Psychologia

Physical Effects of Sleep Deprivation - Psychologia | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it

Everybody needs to sleep. The average human being requires about 7 hours of sleep, however newborn babies sleep the most, between 12 and 18 hours a night and the amount of sleep we require usually decreases as we get older.


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Does Residential Therapy Produce Sustainable Changes for People with Substance Abuse Disorders?

Does Residential Therapy Produce Sustainable Changes for People with Substance Abuse Disorders? | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it
Residential treatment for substance use disorders produces improved functional outcomes that persist for a year after discharge.

Via Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home
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Barbara Wood, Ph.D. www.alcoholismandthefamily.com / Author of Children of Alcoholism and Raising Healthy Children in an Alcoholic Home's curator insight, April 24, 2014 12:01 PM


Dr. Michael M. Miller, MD, from Rogers Memorial Hospital in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, was interviewed by Medscape News about a small study that showed "showed significant improvement in symptoms of depression, functional impairment, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) " that were sustained for a period of one year after patients diagnosed with a substance use disorder were discharged from treatment.


Sample size was small in this interesting study, but it differs from much of the research on the impact of  residential treatment because of it's use of scientifically validated outcome measures to look at important issues such as  patients' mood and social and work adjustment  6 months and 12 months after the completion of residential treatment.  Many studies rely solely on patient's self-report, or family member's report about subjects' abstinence from alcohol or other substance abuse.    


The research team  administered several outcome measures at the point of admission and discharge, and also conducted follow-up studies using the same measures 6 months after discharge and 12 months after discharge.  These measures included the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms, Work and Social Adjustment Scale, PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version, Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Scale and the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment Scale. Subjects were 197 patients  diagnosed with alcohol or other drug dependence whose average length of stay in residential treatment was 26 days.


Dr. Miller reported that patients improved on all measures at discharge: Their mean QIDS score went from moderate to mild, and the mean WSAS score decreased from nearly severe functional impairment to less severe impairment. Mean PCL-C scores decreased by 10 points, "indicating clinically significant improvement". He also observed that the mean raw  Q-LES-Q-SF score for the group improved to a score close to the community sample score of 58.1  while readiness to change scores on the URICA scale remained consistently close to the preparation into action stage at admission and discharge.

 

It was of great interest to the researchers that  functional impairment continued to improve and that depression remained mild 1 year after residential treatment. Medscape News reports that, "The mean QIDS score at 12 months was 7.8, and the mean WSAS score at 12 months was 9.5, which was in the subclinical range." They quoted Dr. Miller's observation that, "The fact that treatment resulted in improvement in depression scores at discharge is not really news, but the fact that these results were sustained at 12 months is new and very important. Also important... was the fact that social adjustment improved during treatment and actually continued to improve thereafter."


Of course, this study does not provide guidance about features of treatment programs that may be crucial in producing sustainable change.



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Bullied children still suffer at 50

Bullied children still suffer at 50 | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it

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marsdentherapy's curator insight, April 21, 2014 5:17 PM

Children who are bullied can still experience negative effects on their physical and mental health more than 40 years later, say researchers from King's College London.

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Mental Health Now Covered Under ACA, but Not for Everyone - US News

Mental Health Now Covered Under ACA, but Not for Everyone - US News | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it
Several states are trying new experiments to ensure complete coverage, while others opt out altogether.

Via Maisen Mosley
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“Say someone is admitted to the hospital with a drug overdose,” says May. “There was a constant tension between payment mechanisms.”

Would the overdose be coded as a substance abuse problem, making it a behavioral issue? Or would it be seen as a suicide attempt —a mental health problem? And what about an underlying physical condition like diabetes?

“It was a morass trying to figure out payment, and everybody wanted to pass it off,” says May.

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Suicide Prevention Sheds a Longstanding Taboo: Talking About Attempts - NYTimes.com

Suicide Prevention Sheds a Longstanding Taboo: Talking About Attempts - NYTimes.com | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it
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» Should Mindfulness Be Taught In Classrooms? - Psych Central News

» Should Mindfulness Be Taught In Classrooms? - Psych Central News | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it

The practice of mindfulness has been shown to counteract the heavy toll of anxiety, stress, chronic pain, and illness on the body and mind; and if kids could


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Stigma Still a Major Hurdle in Getting People the Mental Health Care They Need - Healthline

Stigma Still a Major Hurdle in Getting People the Mental Health Care They Need - Healthline | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it

Guardian Liberty Voice Stigma Still a Major Hurdle in Getting People the Mental Health Care They Need Healthline “We now have clear evidence that stigma has a toxic effect by preventing people seeking help for mental health problems,” senior author...


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12-Step-Style Yoga for Addiction and Depression - Huffington Post

12-Step-Style Yoga for Addiction and Depression - Huffington Post | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it

12-Step-Style Yoga for Addiction and Depression Huffington Post In the course of Suzula's recovery from addiction and depression, she found that 12-Step programs provide a solid framework for healing mentally, emotionally, and spiritually.


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Anxiety relief in children: an interview with Dr. Golda Ginsburg, Johns ... - News-Medical.net

Anxiety relief in children: an interview with Dr. Golda Ginsburg, Johns ... - News-Medical.net | Mental Health Awareness | Scoop.it

Anxiety relief in children: an interview with Dr. Golda Ginsburg, Johns ... News-Medical.net Prevalence rates hover around 10%, although the actual percent varies depending on the specific anxiety disorder, sample, method of assessment, etc.


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