"Asian Spring"
Follow
Find tag "Wukan"
3.6K views | +0 today
"Asian Spring"
Tracking Freedom Movements in South Asia, Central Asia and the Jasmine in China
Curated by SASFOR
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by SASFOR
Scoop.it!

Wukan and the Rule of Law

Wukan and the Rule of Law | "Asian Spring" | Scoop.it

The Jamestown Foundation’s Willy Lam reflects on the conciliatory approach taken by CCP officials in Guangdong to bring an end to the Wukan protests last month, warning that the fate of future mass incidents rests on the willingness of the authorities to uphold the rule of law:

 

Does the Wukan case indeed mean that central- and local-level officials will henceforward lean toward relatively conciliatory and non-violent means to tackle protests by peasants and other disaffected elements in society? At least on the surface, Wang Yang’s handling of Wukan has won the support of the state media. The People’s Daily hailed Guangzhou’s efforts as an example of “accommodating and defusing contradictions and conflicts in a good way.” It praised Guangdong leaders for “grasping well the aspirations of the masses.” The commentary noted whether officials could satisfactorily resolve questions regarding the masses’ malcontents was a “yardstick of cadres’ ties with the people as well as their leadership ability.” The Global Times praised Guangdong leaders for “putting the interests of the public in the first place when handling land disputes” (People’s Daily, December 22, 2011; Global Times [Beijing], December 22, 2011; Bloomberg, December 22, 2011).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by SASFOR
Scoop.it!

Will Wukan Be the New Normal?

Will Wukan Be the New Normal? | "Asian Spring" | Scoop.it
It would be tempting to think that the peaceful end to the standoff in Wukan between local officials and villagers heralds an important shift in the way the Communist Party handles unrest – through new forms of dialogue, rather than the old default...

 

There are multiple grievances across counties and towns, produced by a habitually sleazy pattern of land-seizing officials in bed with debauched businesses. But even then the anger that erupts tends to be short-lived. Unless villagers can find common cause and organize simultaneous assaults, cadres will cope with each outbreak as they have already done: in piecemeal fashion, driven by what they see as having worked and trying to avoid what has not. It doesn’t mean that every confrontation with local anger will end with understanding. But nearly everyone will either get rich or get lost.

 

Here’s another disconnect: what worked in Wukan is unlikely to work as well elsewhere in the country, given that the major threat to social stability is not in the countryside but the cities. Farmers tend to have more faith in Beijing than in local cadres; the latter tend to look up for guidance before going at protests anyway. Urban residents and homeowners, on the other hand, are more likely to lash out if the value of their already-won assets plummets. And those shut out of the opportunity to purchase apartments are already seething.

more...
No comment yet.