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Medical Librarians Of the World (MeLOW)
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Rescooped by Guus van den Brekel from E-Learning and Online Teaching
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46 Tools To Make Infographics In The Classroom

46 Tools To Make Infographics In The Classroom | Medical Librarians Of the World (MeLOW) | Scoop.it
46 Tools To Make Infographics In The Classroom

 

 

Infographics are interesting–a mash of (hopefully) easily-consumed visuals (so, symbols, shapes, and images) and added relevant character-based data (so, numbers, words, and brief sentences).

The learning application for them is clear, with many academic standards–including the Common Core standards–requiring teachers to use a variety of media forms, charts, and other data for both information reading as well as general fluency. It’s curious they haven’t really “caught on” in schools considering how well they bridge both the old-form textbook habit of cramming tons of information into a small space, while also neatly overlapping with the dynamic and digital world.


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, November 9, 2013 3:35 PM

creating infographics is easy using these sites. The most important thing is to do quality research first.

Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, November 10, 2013 9:26 AM

gosto de ferramentas que facilitem o aprndizado visualmente. Para quem compartilha da ideia, mas nao tem o dom grafico como eu...pode recorrer a algumas estrategias prontas...

Filipe Cálix's curator insight, November 22, 2013 6:54 PM

Sempre apelativos os infográficos são uma boa ferramenta para trabalho na sala de aula. Esta lista é extensa e apresenta muito boas sugestões. A explorar.

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Report: Students On Facebook Study 10 Times Less Than Non-Users

Report: Students On Facebook Study 10 Times Less Than Non-Users | Medical Librarians Of the World (MeLOW) | Scoop.it

We all know that as students progress through their school years, their homework load increases. Fifteen year olds may look longingly back to when they were ten and had a whole lot less work to do at home. According to the handy infographic below, the average 6-8 year old spends 9 hours per week studying, vs. 14 hours per week for college students. That doesn’t seem so awful, especially when you consider that the average student spends 4.39 hours per day watching television.


Via Alfredo Calderon, Gust MEES, ABroaderView
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