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Religious Geographies

Religious Geographies | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Jacob Ramsey's comment, September 1, 2013 10:42 PM
Its really interesting how a so many people can collaborate on one topic to bring not only the history of a ideal, but the true history of a long line of people that were a big part of the development of the west in the United States. We always learn about how this and that president did something to help the country expand but it would very interesting to see how we as a country grew from the influences of someone outside of our own society. And not only does this book offer maps but it also includes charts and timelines!
Kendall Belleville's comment, September 2, 2013 5:11 PM
It is really cool to see how much of tho religions are in the United States. it is really nice to see that people are being supportive of them. It is interesting that there are large areas of religion and then some areas have very little.
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:30 AM

This map conveys the population of Mormons in each state. The sizes of the states are presented as corresponding the the Mormon population in each. The map links to more than what it shows. When you ask why are so many Mormons in Utah you can look into the past of Utah and the past of Mormons and you will find that Mormons settled in Utah following one of their leaders. You can then even ask the question why are Mormons still migrating to Utah or the question why did they stay there. Human geography can help us find the answers to these questions. A shared ideology among the community. A lack of repercussion for being open about their belief. A sense of belonging. Family connections. Human Geography help us unravel these mysteries which were brought to our attention by a simple map.

Regional spaces of Mormon's (such as the rather Formal region of Utah) are shown through the map and show the distribution of Mormonism throughout the world.

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Amazing Science: 3D Printing Postings

Amazing Science: 3D Printing Postings | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it

3D printing is a process of making three dimensional solid objects from a digital model using additive processes, where an object is created by laying down successive layers of material. 3D printing is considered distinct from traditional machining techniques which mostly rely on the removal of material by drilling, cutting etc (subtractive processes). 3D printing is used in the fields of industrial design, architecture, engineering, automotive, aerospace, many dental / medical applications, education, geographic information systems, civil engineering, and many others.


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MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:55 AM
oustanding
Rescooped by MelissaRossman from The Inside Scoop on our National Conference Gold Coast Oct 4-6
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Conference Photo Galleries Online

Conference Photo Galleries Online | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it

Thank you to Brett & Kelly Richardson and MD QLD for supplying some of these photos to commemorate a very educational national conference in Oct 2012.  The conference partners,  MD QLD and Duchenne Foundation,  brought you the best from around Australia and the world. It's up to you to use that information and those contacts to keep our sons and families as strong as possible. You are stronger than you know. Stay loved.


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MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:54 AM
excellent
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The New Brunswick Literary Times

The New Brunswick Literary Times | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it

The province of New Brunswick has a rich literary history. The New Brunswick Literary Times provides up-to-date news of writers from or currently living in New Brunswick in a magazine format via articles available online. 

 

The site is curated by Gerard Beirne an Irish writer now living in Fredericton, New Brunswick. A well published author, he is a Board Director of The Writers` Federation of New Brunswick and a Fiction Editor with The Fiddlehead, Canada`s longest surviving literary magazine. 

http://www.gerardbeirne.com/


Via Gerard Beirne
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great one

 

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MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:52 AM
brilliant
Rescooped by MelissaRossman from Seasonal Freebies for Teachers
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Laura Candler's Poetry Page

Laura Candler's Poetry Page | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it

Laura Candler's Poetry Page offers a variety of graphic organizers, websites, and lessons for teaching poetry. You'll find lots of free resources for teaching poetry during National Poetry Month (April) on this page. 


Via Laura Candler
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Nancy Miller's curator insight, April 13, 2013 11:08 AM

Laura Candler is always a great resource!

MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:50 AM
good
trampolinecalf's comment, September 27, 2013 2:55 AM
good
Rescooped by MelissaRossman from Health Supreme
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Australia: New GMO Wheat Can Silence Human Genes, Cause Early Death

Australia: New GMO Wheat Can Silence Human Genes, Cause Early Death | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it

Two Australian researchers have found that CSIRO - The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation - developed GMO wheat which was created to silence particular genes within the crop can also silence certain rNA and DNA sequences in the human body, causing fatality as early as age five or six.

 

The researchers are calling the GMO wheat a ‘safety’ issue, which requires more profundity before the genetically modified crop is planted in more areas of Australia and offered in products in grocery stores.

“We firmly believe that long term chronic toxicological feeding studies are required in addition to the detailed requests ... for the DNA sequences used ... The industry routinely does feeding studies anyway, so it should not be too much more difficult to do long term (lifetime) studies and include inhalation studies.”



Via Sepp Hasslberger
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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, August 26, 2013 7:27 PM

The scientists demand lifetime feeding studies - the test that should be done with all GMOs!

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Visualizing 3 Billion Tweets

Visualizing 3 Billion Tweets | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it

This is a look at 3 billion tweets - every geotagged tweet since September 2011, mapped, showing facets of Twitter's ecosystem and userbase in incredible new detail, revealing demographic, cultural, and social patterns down to city level detail, across the entire world.


Via Seth Dixon
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trampolinecalf's comment, September 27, 2013 2:50 AM
well
Amanda Morgan's comment, September 12, 2:59 PM
It is fascinating to me how much social media not only connects the globe but allows us to observe trends and densely populated areas
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 11:06 AM

It is fascinating to me how much social media not only connects the globe but allows us to observe trends and densely populated areas

 

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Screenr - amcunningham: A very quick pubmed search for open-access papers on skateboarding injuries.

Screenr - amcunningham: A very quick pubmed search for open-access papers on skateboarding injuries. | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it
Screenr | Instant screencasts: Just click record. Screenr’s web-based screen recorder makes it a breeze to create and share your screencasts around the web. Just click the record button, capture your screen & voice, and share the link.
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Rescooped by MelissaRossman from Virtual University: Education in Virtual Worlds
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How 'Minecraft' is shaping the future of touch interfaces - Digital Trends

How 'Minecraft' is shaping the future of touch interfaces - Digital Trends | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it
Digital Trends How 'Minecraft' is shaping the future of touch interfaces Digital Trends Sci-fi stories have long dreamed of direct interaction with virtual worlds, often via room-sized screens, or virtual reality headsets that can read brain...

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MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:32 AM
outstanding
Rescooped by MelissaRossman from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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My Brother Sam Is Dead by James Lincoln Collier & Christopher Collier

My Brother Sam Is Dead by James Lincoln Collier & Christopher Collier | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, July 28, 2013 4:06 PM

Just uploaded a complete updated version of the popular My Brother Sam Is Dead Google Lit Trip developed by Carol LaRow, the well respected educational technology speaker and founder of the Google Historical Voyages and Events website.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:29 AM
excellent
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Religious Geographies

Religious Geographies | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
MelissaRossman's insight:
good
more...
Jacob Ramsey's comment, September 1, 2013 10:42 PM
Its really interesting how a so many people can collaborate on one topic to bring not only the history of a ideal, but the true history of a long line of people that were a big part of the development of the west in the United States. We always learn about how this and that president did something to help the country expand but it would very interesting to see how we as a country grew from the influences of someone outside of our own society. And not only does this book offer maps but it also includes charts and timelines!
Kendall Belleville's comment, September 2, 2013 5:11 PM
It is really cool to see how much of tho religions are in the United States. it is really nice to see that people are being supportive of them. It is interesting that there are large areas of religion and then some areas have very little.
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:30 AM

This map conveys the population of Mormons in each state. The sizes of the states are presented as corresponding the the Mormon population in each. The map links to more than what it shows. When you ask why are so many Mormons in Utah you can look into the past of Utah and the past of Mormons and you will find that Mormons settled in Utah following one of their leaders. You can then even ask the question why are Mormons still migrating to Utah or the question why did they stay there. Human geography can help us find the answers to these questions. A shared ideology among the community. A lack of repercussion for being open about their belief. A sense of belonging. Family connections. Human Geography help us unravel these mysteries which were brought to our attention by a simple map.

Regional spaces of Mormon's (such as the rather Formal region of Utah) are shown through the map and show the distribution of Mormonism throughout the world.

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2nd International Conference on Econophysics

2nd International Conference on Econophysics | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it

EVENT : The 2nd International Conference on Econophysics (ICE) will be held from 13th to 14th of September 2013, at the Lucy Hotel, Kavala.


Via FuturICT, Complexity Digest
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MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:22 AM
nice one
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Struggle Means Learning: Difference in Eastern and Western Cultures ~Alix Spiegel

Struggle Means Learning: Difference in Eastern and Western Cultures ~Alix Spiegel | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it

In 1979, when Jim Stigler was still a graduate student at the University of Michigan, he went to Japan to research teaching methods and found himself sitting in the back row of a crowded fourth-grade math class.

 

“The teacher was trying to teach the class how to draw three-dimensional cubes on paper,” Stigler explains, “and one kid was just totally having trouble with it. His cube looked all cockeyed, so the teacher said to him, ‘Why don’t you go put yours on the board?’ So right there I thought, ‘That’s interesting! He took the one who can’t do it and told him to go and put it on the board.’ ”

 

Stigler knew that in American classrooms, it was usually the best kid in the class who was invited to the board. And so he watched with interest as the Japanese student dutifully came to the board and started drawing, but still couldn’t complete the cube. Every few minutes, the teacher would ask the rest of the class whether the kid had gotten it right, and the class would look up from their work, and shake their heads no. And as the period progressed, Stigler noticed that he — Stigler — was getting more and more anxious.

 

In Japanese classrooms, teachers consciously design tasks that are slightly beyond the capabilities of the students they teach, so the students can actually experience struggling with something just outside their reach.

 

“I realized that I was sitting there starting to perspire,” he says, “because I was really empathizing with this kid. I thought, ‘This kid is going to break into tears!’ ”

 

But the kid didn’t break into tears. Stigler says the child continued to draw his cube with equanimity. “And at the end of the class, he did make his cube look right! And the teacher said to the class, ‘How does that look, class?’ And they all looked up and said, ‘He did it!’ And they broke into applause.” The kid smiled a huge smile and sat down, clearly proud of himself.

 

Stigler is now a professor of psychology at UCLA who studies teaching and learning around the world, and he says it was this small experience that first got him thinking about how differently East and West approach the experience of intellectual struggle.

 

“I think that from very early ages we [in America] see struggle as an indicator that you’re just not very smart,” Stigler says. “It’s a sign of low ability — people who are smart don’t struggle, they just naturally get it, that’s our folk theory. Whereas in Asian cultures they tend to see struggle more as an opportunity.”

 

In Eastern cultures, Stigler says, it’s just assumed that struggle is a predictable part of the learning process. Everyone is expected to struggle in the process of learning, and so struggling becomes a chance to show that you, the student, have what it takes emotionally to resolve the problem by persisting through that struggle.

 

“They’ve taught them that suffering can be a good thing,” Stigler says. “I mean it sounds bad, but I think that’s what they’ve taught them.”

Granting that there is a lot of cultural diversity within East and West and it’s possible to point to counterexamples in each, Stigler still sums up the difference this way: For the most part in American culture, intellectual struggle in schoolchildren is seen as an indicator of weakness, while in Eastern cultures it is not only tolerated but is often used to measure emotional strength.

 

It’s a small difference in approach that Stigler believes has some very big implications.

 

‘Struggle’

 

Stigler is not the first psychologist to notice the difference in how East and West approach the experience of intellectual struggle.

 

Jin Li is a professor at Brown University who, like Stigler, compares the learning beliefs of Asian and U.S. children. She says that to understand why these two cultures view struggle so differently, it’s good to step back and examine how they think about where academic excellence comes from.

 

For the past decade or so, Li has been recording conversations between American mothers and their children, and Taiwanese mothers and their children. Li then analyzes those conversations to see how the mothers talk to the children about school.

 

She shared with me one conversation that she had recorded between an American mother and her 8-year-old son.

The mother and the son are discussing books. The son, though young, is a great student who loves to learn. He tells his mother that he and his friends talk about books even during recess, and she responds with this:

 

Mother: Do you know that’s what smart people do, smart grown-ups?

Child: I know … talk about books.

Mother: Yeah. So that’s a pretty smart thing to do to talk about a book.

Child: Hmmm mmmm.

 

It’s a small exchange — a moment. But Li says, this drop of conversation contains a world of cultural assumptions and beliefs.

 

Essentially, the American mother is communicating to her son that the cause of his success in school is his intelligence. He’s smart — which, Li says, is a common American view.

 

“The idea of intelligence is believed in the West as a cause,” Li explains. “She is telling him that there is something in him, in his mind, that enables him to do what he does.”

 

But in many Asian cultures, Li says, academic excellence isn’t linked with intelligence in the same way. “It resides in what they do, but not who they are, what they’re born with,” she says.

 

She shares another conversation, this time between a Taiwanese mother and her 9-year-old son. They are talking about the piano — the boy won first place in a competition, and the mother is explaining to him why.

 

“You practiced and practiced with lots of energy,” she tells him. “It got really hard, but you made a great effort. You insisted on practicing yourself.”

“So the focus is on the process of persisting through it despite the challenges, not giving up, and that’s what leads to success,” Li says.

 

If struggle indicates strength — an ability to face down the challenges that inevitably occur when you are trying to learn something — you’re more willing to accept it.

 

All of this matters because the way you conceptualize the act of struggling with something profoundly affects your actual behavior.

 

Obviously if struggle indicates weakness — a lack of intelligence — it makes you feel bad, and so you’re less likely to put up with it. But if struggle indicates strength — an ability to face down the challenges that inevitably occur when you are trying to learn something — you’re more willing to accept it.

 

And Stigler feels in the real world it is easy to see the consequences of these different interpretations of struggle.

 

“We did a study many years ago with first-grade students,” he tells me. “We decided to go out and give the students an impossible math problem to work on, and then we would measure how long they worked on it before they gave up.”

 

The American students “worked on it less than 30 seconds on average and then they basically looked at us and said, ‘We haven’t had this,’ ” he says.

But the Japanese students worked for the entire hour on the impossible problem. “And finally we had to stop the session because the hour was up.

 

And then we had to debrief them and say, ‘Oh, that was not a possible problem; that was an impossible problem!’ and they looked at us like, ‘What kind of animals are we?’ ” Stigler recalls.

 

“Think about that [kind of behavior] spread over a lifetime,” he says. “That’s a big difference.”

 

Not East Versus West

 

This is not to imply that the Eastern way of interpreting struggle — or anything else — is better than the Western way, or vice versa. Each have their strengths and weaknesses, which both sides know. Westerns tend to worry that their kids won’t be able to compete against Asian kids who excel in many areas but especially in math and science. Li says that educators from Asian countries have their own set of worries.

 

”'Our children are not creative. Our children do not have individuality. They’re just robots.’ You hear the educators from Asian countries express that concern, a lot,” she notes.

 

So, is it possible for one culture to adopt the beliefs of another culture if they see that culture producing better results?

 

Both Stigler and Li think that changing culture is hard, but that it’s possible to think differently in ways that can help. “Could we change our views of learning and place more emphasis on struggle?” Stigler asks. “Yeah.” 

 

For example, Stigler says, in the Japanese classrooms that he’s studied, teachers consciously design tasks that are slightly beyond the capabilities of the students they teach, so the students can actually experience struggling with something just outside their reach. Then, once the task is mastered, the teachers actively point out that the student was able to accomplish it through hard work and struggle.

 

“And I just think that especially in schools, we don’t create enough of those experiences, and then we don’t point them out clearly enough.”

But we can, Stigler says.

 

In the meantime, he and the other psychologists doing this work say there are more differences to map — differences that allow both cultures to more clearly see who they are.

 

This post originally appeared on NPR.


Via Jim Manske
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That's graet

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MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:55 AM
very nice
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20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities

20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it

The following topics are covered:

 

Aerospace, Anthropology, Astrobiology, Astronomy, Astrophysics, Biochemistry, Bioengineering, Biology, Biotechnology, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Cognitive Science, Computers, Cosmology, Dentistry, Electrical Engineering, Engineering, Environment, Future, General Science, Geoscience, Machine Learning, Material Science, Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering, Medicine, Metallurgy, Mining, Nanotechnology, Oceanography, Philosophy, Physics, Physiology, Robotics, and Sociology.

 

Lectures are in Playlists and are alphabetically sorted with thumbnail pictures. No fee, no registration required - learn at your own pace. Certificates can be arranged with presenting universities.

 

NOTE: To subscribe to the RSS feed of Amazing Science, copy http://www.scoop.it/t/amazing-science/rss.xml into the URL field of your browser and click "subscribe".

 

This newsletter is aggregated from over 1450 news sources:

http://www.genautica.com/links/1450_news_sources.html


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Casper Pieters's curator insight, March 9, 7:21 PM

Great resources for online learning just about everything.  All you need is will power and self- discipline.

Siegfried Holle's curator insight, July 4, 8:45 AM

Your knowledge is your strength and power 

Saberes Sin Fronteras Ong's curator insight, November 30, 5:33 PM

Acceso gratuito a documentos de las mejores universidades del mundo

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Making The Connections: Our City, Our Society, Our Health

Health is about more than having access to doctors, drugs and hospitals. Our health is shaped by a complex set of interconnected and dynamic social factors. 

This short video is a great introduction to the social determinants of health.


Via AnneMarie Cunningham
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MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:52 AM
wonderful
trampolinecalf's comment, September 27, 2013 2:55 AM
well
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Placing Literature maps book scenes in the real world

Placing Literature maps book scenes in the real world | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it

"Placing Literature maps book scenes in the real world."


Via Seth Dixon
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wonderful

 

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Richard Evans's curator insight, June 26, 2013 9:17 PM

Fusing literature and digital maps for a Real World contextual learning experience. 

Yael BOUBLIL's curator insight, June 29, 2013 5:18 AM

Une piste intéressante...

MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:48 AM
wonderful
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Make TAFE a priority | Australian Greens

Make TAFE a priority | Australian Greens | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it

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MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:42 AM
wonderful
Rescooped by MelissaRossman from Tourism Social Media
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Study Snapshot: Adventure Tourism Market Study 2013

Study Snapshot: Adventure Tourism Market Study 2013 | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it

The newly released 2013 Adventure Tourism Market Study, produced by the George Washington University (GW) and the Adventure Travel Trade Association (ATTA), estimates the value and provides an updated profile of the adventure travel market.


Via Wendy Forbes
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really excellent

 

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MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:36 AM
really excellent
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What makes business school research impactful? Academic visibility, Prominence, perceived quality or collaboration?

What makes business school research impactful? Academic visibility, Prominence, perceived quality or collaboration? | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it

ABSTRACT 

What makes business school research impactful? What determine the number of citation a business school received? The relative proportion of articles published by North American business school is declining (less than 50% in 2010) while the number of citations received by north American business schools better resists (70% of market share in 2010). This paper explores the determinants of academic impact measured by citations at the business school level and the evolution over the last 20 years. It analyzes the respective influence of different effects on the total number of citations: media ranking, number of publication, number of publication in top journals, collaboration with prominent actors (top 100 MBAs), the number of article produced and national/international collaborations. 

The paper assesses impact by counting systematically citations at the organization level. The results show that media ranking influence more the visibility of academic work and scholarship than the number of paper published or the quality of journals. Such results question the functioning of academia in Management and shed light on the interrelationship between status and reputation in academia. 

 

The authors:"To cope with the growing number of publications and high work pressure, scholars are selecting what they read not only according to the status of journals but rather according the reputation of the institution the scholars come from. The triggers of visibility are becoming circular. Scholars are reading and citing other scholars from high reputation institutions to attest that they also belong to the network of reputable scholars. It increases the reputation of those scholars and of their institution, leading to higher levels of citations."

 

Source:

 

ACADEMIC VISIBILITY: PROMINENCE, PERCEIVED QUALITY OR COLLABORATION? 

Charles Baden Fuller*, Mustapha Belkhouja**, Vincent Mangemati 

 

Fulltext: http://mosaic.hec.ca/documents/file/CBFMBVM2013%20-%20Academic%20visibility.pdf

 


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MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:32 AM
excellent
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Vitamin C can kill drug-resistant TB

Vitamin C can kill drug-resistant TB | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it
Vitamin C can kill multidrug-resistant TB in the lab, scientists reveal.
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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


Via Seth Dixon
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CT Blake's curator insight, October 13, 9:15 AM

Gives students the idea of how complex the background of modern religions are.

Olivia G Torres's curator insight, November 30, 6:18 PM

This was super awesome!! It's a diagram that lets you zoom into the branches that are religion. Its really cool to see how different religions derived and how some are connected. I think it's really cool to see how many different branches have been made through out the years and just how far back religions went. I really like that you can see the long and sometimes lost roots of the religion.

Abby Laybourn's curator insight, December 10, 1:25 PM

Although this was kind of hard to read it was interesting to see how different religions are related and where they stem from. 

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The Eyes and Ears of ITER

The Eyes and Ears of ITER | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it

"Not having diagnostics in the machine would be like flying in the dark," Michael said. "We couldn't 'see' what was happening on the inside. In fact, we couldn't even start the machine without the information that diagnostics will provide to manage operational parameters like coil current."


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really good

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MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:24 AM
really good
trampolinecalf's comment, September 27, 2013 2:45 AM
nice one
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Biotech Billionaire Nets $1.5 Billion On Intrexon - Forbes

Biotech Billionaire Nets $1.5 Billion On Intrexon - Forbes | MelissaRossman | Scoop.it

Investments in SB companies could be profitable. Intrexon is in the realm of “synthetic biology,” a more radical version of existing biotech genetic tweaking that includes reengineering living cells from the ground up. In one day only shares went up 1.5 B USD!


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