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Prolonged Fasting 'Re-Boots' Immune System

Prolonged Fasting 'Re-Boots' Immune System | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Results of a new study on mice and a phase 1 trial of humans suggest that prolonged cycles of fasting - for 2-4 days at a time - not only protect against toxic effects of chemotherapy, but also trigger stem cell regeneration of new immune cells and clearing out of old, damaged cells.


"The study, by researchers from the University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles, and published in the journalCell Stem Cell, is the first to show that a natural intervention can trigger regeneration of an organ or system through stem cells.


"The team believes the findings could benefit people with immune system damage, for example if they have received chemotherapy treatment for cancer. It could also benefit the elderly whose immune systems are weakened through aging, making them more susceptible to disease."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical News Today  |  Jun 6, 2014

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Tambre Leighn's curator insight, June 7, 2014 1:13 PM

Intuitively this week, my body felt like it needed to fast.  Intuitively, even thought I'd only planned a two day juice fast, it turned into four.  With the right plan for fasting, and doctor's supervision as needed depending on your state of health or knowledge about how to fast correctly, it is highly doable.  

 

I use a company that specializes in juicing and provides a whole kit of raw juices designed to give me different nutrients at different times of the day and it's all organic.  I was never hungry and only had one afternoon dealing with a detox headache from going off caffeine. The rest of the time I was completely energized.  Returning to food now, my body is craving raw vegetables and has no desire for caffeine or some of the other nutritional "slips" into foods that aren't healthy for me.

 

Amazing to see more natural paths to healing being embraced by the medical community.  Medical interventions are sometimes very necessary and so I am grateful that we have them.  It's not an either/or...it's an and - how can more "traditional" medical approaches and some natural approaches work together for best outcomes...that's an exciting place to be.

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 6, 2014 3:39 PM

Medical News Today  |  Jun 6, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 6, 2014 3:38 PM

Medical News Today  |  Jun 6, 2014

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mTOR Inhibitors May Be Associated with Kidney Injury

A class of cancer drugs called mTOR inhibitors may produce kidney toxicity in at least some patients. mTOR inhibitors, including rapamycin (sirolimus/Rapamune), temsirolimus (Torisel), everolimus (Afinitor), and ridaforolimus, are used to treat certain forms of breast and kidney cancer, and are under investigation for several other cancers. Researchers described four cases of patients treated with mTOR inhibitors developing severe acute kidney injury. They recommend that doctors carefully monitor kidney function in patients receiving these drugs. However, other experts emphasize that it is unclear whether the mTOR inhibitors were indeed the cause of the kidney injury. In at least one case, the patient was also taking other drugs known to cause kidney toxicity.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medscape | Jul 3, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 7, 2013 3:55 AM

Medscape | Jul 3, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 8, 2013 1:36 PM

Medscape | Jul 3, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 8, 2013 1:36 PM

Medscape | Jul 3, 2013

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Timing Cancer Treatment for Maximum Effectiveness

Timing Cancer Treatment for Maximum Effectiveness | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Our bodies follow a 24-hour 'biorhythm' that affects most of our biological functions. This fact forms the basis of cancer chronotherapy, which takes time of day into account to plan cancer treatment. Administering cancer drugs at the right time can double effectiveness while reducing toxicity up to fivefold. However, individual differences in biorhythms mean that the 'right time' varies from one person to another. In a recent study, researchers linked gene expression in mice with the time point at which the chemotherapy agent irinotecan (Camptosar) produced the least toxicity. They developed a mathematical model that predicts each animal's ideal time point based on the expression of two genes. In the future, they hope to develop similar tools to help predict the best time for cancer treatment in human patients.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Nov 22, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:13 AM

Medical Xpress  |  Nov 22, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:05 PM

Medical Xpress  |  Nov 22, 2013