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Acral Melanoma Tumors May Require More Aggressive Surgical Treatment

Acral Melanoma Tumors May Require More Aggressive Surgical Treatment | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Acral melanoma was found to have higher recurrence and lower survival rates than other types of melanoma and may require more aggressive surgical intervention, according to researchers.


"The researchers selected patients from a prospectively enrolled cohort of primary melanoma patients at NYU Langone Medical Center; 61 patients with acral melanoma and 183 patients with non-acral melanoma were included. Median follow-up was 33 months in the acral melanoma cohort and 58 months in the non-acral melanoma cohort."

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Healio  |  Jun 11, 2014

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Sentinel-Node Biopsy Improved DFS, Staging in Melanoma

Sentinel-Node Biopsy Improved DFS, Staging in Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Sentinel lymph node biopsy after wide excision improved DFS compared with wide excision alone among patients with intermediate and thick melanomas, according to final results of the MSLT-1 trial presented at the HemOnc Today Melanoma and Cutaneous Malignancies meeting in New York.


“ 'We found that performing sentinel lymph node biopsy is very accurate and improves staging in order to determine whether additional treatments are needed, such as additional surgery or adjuvant systemic therapy,' Robert H.I. Andtbacka, MD, CM, FACS, FRCSC, associate professor of surgery at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, said during a presentation. 'It also forms a basis for us to perform all the subsequent studies that we do in melanoma to make sure patients we have for our clinical trials are well balanced.' "


Editor's note: DFS stands for disease-free survival.

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Healio  |  Apr 15, 2014

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Adjuvant Ipilimumab Improved RFS in High-Risk, Stage III Melanoma

Adjuvant Ipilimumab Improved RFS in High-Risk, Stage III Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Adjuvant ipilimumab significantly improved RFS compared with placebo among patients with resected stage III melanoma who were at high risk for recurrence, according to the final analysis of a phase 3 study presented at the ASCO Annual Meeting.


“ 'Although there are approved adjuvant therapies, they are still to be improved, and this is clearly an unmet need,' researcher Alexander Eggermont, MD, PhD, director general of the Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus Grand Paris in France, said during a press conference. 'Ipilimumab is the first drug approved for metastatic melanoma, based on a proven impact on OS. This is the first trial ever with a drug that had an improvement in OS in metastatic melanoma.' "


Editor's note: Patients with advanced melanoma who have their tumors removed by surgery ("resected") can be at high risk for recurrence of their cancer. In a clinical trial with volunteer patients, researchers are testing an "adjuvant" treatment meant to prevent recurrence. All patients had resected stage III melanoma. It was found that patients who took the drug ipilimumab (Yervoy) after resection had a significantly greater amount of time pass before recurrence than patients who took a placebo. Further follow-up of the patients will reveal effects on overall survival.

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Healio  |  Jun 10, 2014

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New Dye Could Tag Melanomas That Aren't Dark

New Dye Could Tag Melanomas That Aren't Dark | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Surgeons may be able to see—and remove—skin cancers completely, thanks to a new compound that tags tumors. Called BLZ-100, the experimental compound combines a fluorescent dye with a protein fragment that binds cancer cells. A phase I clinical trial of intravenously injected BLZ-100 will soon be underway in Australia, enrolling up to 30 people with basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, or melanomas that lack the dark pigment melanin, making them hard to diagnose. In addition, U.S. clinical trials are expected for other kinds of tumors by the end of 2014.



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Blaze Bioscience, Inc.  |  Dec 17, 2013

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