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Cancer Survivors Need Long-Term Care Plans

Cancer Survivors Need Long-Term Care Plans | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Most people who survive cancer are left to deal with the physical and emotional aftermath of treatment on their own—but they still need help. Long-term side effects of cancer treatments range from heart damage and painful nerve death to depression and body image disorders. However, a recent survey found that only 17% of people who survived cancer were given a long-term care plan. Cancer survivors can seek help at seven U.S. centers that focus on care after cancer, as well as the National Cancer Institute’s Office of Cancer Survivorship. The U.S. has nearly 14 million cancer survivors today, with 18 million expected by 2022.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Bloomberg│Jun 3, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 7, 2013 1:23 PM

Bloomberg│Jun 3, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 7, 2013 1:24 PM

Bloomberg│Jun 3, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 7, 2013 1:24 PM

Bloomberg│Jun 3, 2013

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One Follow-Up Irradiation May Be Enough for Bone Tumor Pain

Radiation can alleviate pain in people with cancers that spread to the bones, but this treatment also has nasty side effects, including vomiting, diarrhea, and lack of appetite. New research suggests that when follow-up radiation is needed, one treatment may relieve pain, as well as several that are spread over different days—and have fewer side effects. Two months into a trial of 850 people with tumors in their bones, participants reported the same pain relief and took the same amount of pain-relieving drugs, whether they had a single follow-up radiation treatment or five to eight treatments. These findings were presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's 2013 meeting.

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Cancer Network│Jun 3, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 5, 2013 1:40 PM

Cancer Network│June 3, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 5, 2013 1:41 PM

Cancer Network│June 3, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 5, 2013 1:41 PM

Cancer Network│June 3, 2013

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Nivolumab Extends Life in Melanoma Patients in Early Trial

Nivolumab Extends Life in Melanoma Patients in Early Trial | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

An experimental immunotherapy drug called nivolumab may increase survival in people with melanomas that have spread. Nivolumab blocks a protein called PD-1, which lets tumor cells evade the immune system. In a phase I trial of melanoma patients who had not responded to previous treatments, researchers found tumors shrank in 41% of those given the highest dose of nivolumab (3 mg/kg). Overall, 62% survived to 1 year and 43% survived to 2 years and only 2% had severe side effects. Nivolumab is currently being tested in three phase III trials. These findings were among several advances in immunotherapy treatments for melanoma presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's 2013 meeting.

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OncLive│Jun 2, 2013

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Fast-Tracked Immunotherapy Drug Still Promising for Melanoma

Encouraging results are in from the first clinical trial of lambrolizumab, an experimental immunotherapy drug that was granted a speedy review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in April. Formerly known as MK-3475, lambrolizumab blocks a protein (PD-1) that lets tumor cells evade the immune system. The researchers treated 135 people with melanomas that had spread, giving some a lower dose and others a higher dose of the new drug. The study showed that tumors shrank in 38% of all those treated and in 52% of those treated with the higher dose. While the side effects were generally mild, 13% of those treated had more serious reactions, such as thyroid problems or lung or kidney inflammation. This clinical trial is currently recruiting new participants.

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New England Journal of Medicine│Jun 2, 2013

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New Combination Treatment May Target Melanomas with BRAF Mutations Safely

New Combination Treatment May Target Melanomas with BRAF Mutations Safely | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

While melanomas with BRAF mutations can be targeted with a combination of BRAF inhibitors and MEK inhibitors, the treatment can have side effects such as fever, light sensitivity, and rashes. But early results of a phase I clinical trial suggest that BRAF-mutant melanomas could be treated safely and effectively with a new combination: LGX818, a BRAF inhibitor developed by Novartis and MEK162, a MEK inhibitor developed by Array BioPharma. Moreover, using these drugs together may decrease common side effects of targeted BRAF treatments, including skin toxicities and muscle and joint pain. A phase III trial of this new combination treatment is expected to begin later in 2013.

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Array Biopharma│Jun 3, 2013

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Experimental Immunotherapy Promising for a Range of Cancers

Many kinds of tumors make an immune system-suppressing protein that is linked to more extensive disease and reduced survival. Now, a completed phase I trial suggests that an experimental drug that inhibits this protein could help people with a range of cancers that have not responded to other treatments. The protein is called oral indoleamine dioxygenase-1 (IDO1), and the drug that inhibits it is called INCB024360. The trial showed that this drug kept tumors from growing in 30% of the 52 people treated, half of whom had colorectal cancer, which has generally resisted immunotherapy. Moreover, this new drug had manageable side-effects. These findings were presented at the 2013 meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Now, a Phase I/II trial is underway to test treating melanoma with INCB024360, both alone and in combination with ipilimumab, another immunotherapy.

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Business Wire│Jun 2, 2013

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Combination Immunotherapy Boosts Survival in Melanoma Patients

Combination Immunotherapy Boosts Survival in Melanoma Patients | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

People with melanoma may live longer when treated with two drugs that boost the immune system, suggest early results from a clinical trial. The drugs are ipilimumab, which is FDA approved, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), which is experimental. In a phase II trial of 245 people with melanoma, more were alive at 1 year when treated with both drugs than when treated with ipilimumab alone (69% vs 53%). The combination treatment also helped alleviate the severe toxic side effects of ipilimumab, which dropped from 58% to 45%. These findings were among several advances in immunotherapy treatments for melanoma presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's 2013 meeting.

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The Oncology Report│Jun 2, 2013

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Looking Good Helps People with Cancer Feel Better, Too

Cancer treatments can extend and even save lives, but the cosmetic side effects can devastate a person's sense of self. These changes in appearance—from dry, itchy skin to loss of hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes to disfiguring surgery—can also lead to social isolation. Understandably, changes to the face are particularly distressing. Ways of coping with altered looks include makeup and wigs as well as physical activity and therapy. Women with cancer can get free beauty tips from makeup artists and wig stylists through the Look Good…Feel Better program, which is offered at more than 3,000 hospitals and community centers across the country.



Cancer Commons's insight:

National Cancer Institute │ Mar 27, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 1, 2013 7:17 PM

National Cancer Institute│Mar 27, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 1, 2013 7:17 PM

National Cancer Institute│Mar 27, 2013