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New Clues to Skin Cancer Development Show Sunscreen is Not Enough

New Clues to Skin Cancer Development Show Sunscreen is Not Enough | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Scientists have shown that sunscreen cannot be relied upon alone to prevent malignant melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer, according to research* published in Nature.


"The work supports the approach taken by public health campaigns that call for people to use a combination of shade and clothing to protect their skin, applying sunscreen to the areas you can't cover.


"The research explains more about the mechanism by which UV light leads to melanoma and also explores the extent to which sunscreen is able to prevent UV light from damaging healthy cells."

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 12, 2014

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Blistering Sunburns in Adolescence Linked with 80% Higher Risk for Melanoma

Blistering Sunburns in Adolescence Linked with 80% Higher Risk for Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The risk for developing melanoma is significantly linked with severe sunburns before age 20 years among young white women, according to recent findings.


"Specifically, the risk for onset of melanoma in adulthood was increased by 80% among those who suffered at least five blistering sunburns between the ages of 15 and 20 years."

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Healio  |  May 29, 2014

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Rare Skin Cancer on Palms and Soles More Likely to Come Back Compared to Other Melanomas

Rare Skin Cancer on Palms and Soles More Likely to Come Back Compared to Other Melanomas | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A rare type of melanoma that disproportionately attacks the palms and soles and under the nails of Asians, African-Americans, and Hispanics, who all generally have darker skins, and is not caused by sun exposure, is almost twice as likely to recur than other similar types of skin cancer, according to results of a study in 244 patients.


"The finding about acral lentiginous melanoma, as the potentially deadly cancer is known, is part of a study to be presented May 31 by researchers at the Perlmutter Cancer Center of NYU Langone at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago."

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Medical Xpress  |  May 29, 2014

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10 Issues to Consider During National Skin Cancer Awareness Month

10 Issues to Consider During National Skin Cancer Awareness Month | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Accounting for approximately half of all cancers in the United States, skin cancer is widely recognized as the most common cause of cancer nationwide. More than 3.5 million cases of skin cancer are diagnosed each year, and according to the Skin Cancer Foundation, incidences of skin cancer outnumber all combined cases of breast, colon, lung and prostate cancers.


"With the month of May designated as National Skin Cancer Awareness Month, HemOnc Today highlights 10 issues for oncologists and dermatologists to consider for their patients, as well as the new guideline revisions and research regarding the identification, treatment and management of patients with melanoma and skin cancer."

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Healio  |  May 15, 2014

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Genetic Mutations Warn of Skin Cancer Risk

Genetic Mutations Warn of Skin Cancer Risk | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Researchers have discovered that mutations in a specific gene are responsible for a hereditary form of melanoma.


"Every year in the UK, almost 12,000 people are diagnosed with melanoma, a form of skin cancer. About 1 in 20 people with melanoma have a strong family history of the disease. In these patients, pinpointing the genetic mutations that drive disease development allows dermatologists to identify people who should be part of melanoma surveillance programmes.


"The team found that people with specific mutations in the POT1 gene were extremely likely to develop melanoma. These mutations deactivate the POT1 gene that protects the ends of our chromosomes from damage."

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 30, 2014

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Non-Invasive Gene Expression Profile Test Shown to Identify Sentinel Lymph Node Negative Melanoma Patients at High Risk of Metastasis

"Castle Biosciences Inc. has announced study results showing its gene expression profile (GEP) test (DecisionDx-Melanoma) can identify primary cutaneous (skin) melanoma tumors that are likely to metastasize in patients who had a negative sentinel lymph node biopsy. The data are being presented at the Latest in Dermatology Research Symposium session of the 72nd Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology. The DecisionDx-Melanoma test completed validation in 2013 and is widely used to determine metastatic risk in Stage I and II melanoma patients."

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Medical News Today  |  Mar 25, 2014

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Young Skin Cancer Survivors at Risk of Other Cancers Later

Young Skin Cancer Survivors at Risk of Other Cancers Later | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Young people who have been diagnosed with non-melanoma skin cancer related to sun exposure, under the age of 25, face a higher risk of developing melanoma and other cancers later in life, a study has shown. The researchers found that those who had NMSC under 25 years of age were 53 times more likely to get bone cancer, 26 times more likely to get blood cancers, 20 times more likely to get brain cancer, and 14 times more likely to get any cancer excluding those of the skin."

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ScienceDaily  |  Mar 10, 2014

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Targeted Intervention Decreased Melanoma Risk, Increased Early Prevention

Targeted Intervention Decreased Melanoma Risk, Increased Early Prevention | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A targeted screening and education strategy aimed at patients at high risk for melanoma favorably affected behaviors that may reduce melanoma risk compared with a standard information-based campaign, according to the results of a recent study published in Annals of Family Medicine.


"General practitioner counseling, combined with a skin examination and a self-assessment tool resulted in patients retaining information about melanoma risk factors and reducing high-risk behaviors."

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Cancer Network  |  Feb 7, 2014

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National Poll Shows Public Divided on Genetic Testing to Predict Cancer Risk

National Poll Shows Public Divided on Genetic Testing to Predict Cancer Risk | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A national poll from the University of Utah's Huntsman Cancer Institute shows 34 percent of respondents would not seek genetic testing to predict their likelihood of developing a hereditary cancer – even if the cost of the testing was not an issue.


"Concerns about employment and insurability were cited as the primary reason, even though current laws prohibit such discrimination.

The poll also shows only 35 percent of respondents would be extremely or very likely to seek aggressive prophylactic or preventive treatment, such as a mastectomy, if they had a family history of cancer and genetic testing indicated a genetic pre-disposition to cancer."

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Medical Xpress  |  Feb 5, 2014

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Radiation from Medical Imaging May Increase Cancer Rates

Radiation from Medical Imaging May Increase Cancer Rates | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Medical imaging techniques that use high doses of radiation, including CT scans, play an important role in modern medicine, including cancer screening. However, these procedures may themselves increase the incidence of cancer. Radiation exposure from medical imaging in the U.S. has increased more than sixfold between the 1980s and 2006. Several studies have linked multiple CT scans to increased cancer risk. Moreover, there are no official guidelines on the correct radiation doses for different medical imaging techniques, meaning that doses at one hospital may be up to 50 times higher than at another. Clear standards are needed to ensure that high-radiation imaging techniques are only used when clearly medically necessary and that the lowest feasible radiation doses are employed.

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New York Times  |  Jan 30, 2014

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New York Times  |  Jan 30, 2014

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No Convincing Evidence That Supplements Help Prevent Cancer

No Convincing Evidence That Supplements Help Prevent Cancer | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A review by a panel of independent U.S. experts concludes there is not enough evidence to recommend either for or against the use of most vitamin or mineral supplements to reduce the risk of cancer. However, the panel’s guidelines advise against the use of beta-carotene (a precursor of vitamin A) and vitamin E for cancer prevention, because there is relatively clear evidence that neither is effective. Indeed, beta-carotene supplements appear to increase lung cancer risk in people already at high risk of the disease. Instead, the panel recommends that healthy adults without nutritional deficiencies get their nutrients by eating a varied diet to minimize the risk of chronic disease, including cancer.

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MedPage Today | Nov 11, 2013

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Study: Cancer Center Ads Long on Emotions, Short on Facts

Study: Cancer Center Ads Long on Emotions, Short on Facts | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Advertisements for cancer centers often appeal to consumers’ emotions but rarely provide useful information about the benefits, risks, or costs of treatment, a recent analysis concluded.


“ 'We found that cancer therapies were promoted more commonly than supportive or screening services and were often described in vague or general terms,' the authors wrote in the May 27 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. 'Advertisements commonly evoked hope for survival, promoted innovative treatment advances, and used language about fighting cancer while providing relatively limited information about benefits, risks, costs, or insurance coverage of advertised therapies.' "

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Cancer Network  |  May 30, 2014

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Indoor Tanning, Even Without Burning, Increases the Risk of Melanoma

Indoor Tanning, Even Without Burning, Increases the Risk of Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"People sometimes use indoor tanning in the belief that this will prevent burns when they tan outdoors. However, indoor tanning raises the risk of developing melanoma even if a person has never had burns from either indoor or outdoor tanning, according to a study published May 29 in the JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute.


"To test the hypothesis that indoor tanning without burns prevents sunburn and subsequent skin cancer, researchers at the Masonic Cancer Center, Department of Dermatology, and Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis used data from a case-control study on indoor tanning and the risk of melanoma. The researchers had detailed information on indoor tanning and sun exposure for the study participants and excluded those who experienced a burn while tanning indoors."

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Medical Xpress  |  May 28, 2014

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Patients with Primary Invasive Melanoma at Increased Risk for Subsequent Invasive Melanoma

Patients with Primary Invasive Melanoma at Increased Risk for Subsequent Invasive Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Patients with a primary invasive or in situ melanoma had a significantly increased relative risk for developing a subsequent invasive melanoma, according to recent study results.


"Danny R. Youlden, BSc, and fellow researchers used population-based data for melanoma diagnoses collected by the Queensland Cancer Registry in Australia to conduct a retrospective cohort study. All Queensland residents aged 15 years and older diagnosed with a first primary invasive or in situ melanoma between 1982 and 2005 were included. There were 39,668 cases of first primary invasive melanoma (55.8% male) and 22,845 cases of first primary in situ melanoma (54.4% male) identified through 2010."

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Healio  |  May 19, 2014

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Nonsentinel Lymph Node Status in Melanoma Has Prognostic Value

Nonsentinel Lymph Node Status in Melanoma Has Prognostic Value | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Nonsentinel lymph node (NSLN) status in patients who underwent complete lymph node dissection after positive sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) had independent prognostic value in patients with two to three positive lymph nodes, according to the results of a study published recently in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.


"Furthermore, researchers led by Sandro Pasquali, MD, of the University of Padova, Italy, found that patients who had metastatic disease in their NSLN had their risk for melanoma death increased by more than one-third."


Editor's note: Sentinel lymph nodes (those closest to the tumor) can be examined to predict whether a patient will survive melanoma. This study shows that nonsentinel lymph nodes could potentially be used for survival predictions. We covered a similar story last July.

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Cancer Network  |  Apr 1, 2014

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Eating Organic Food Doesn't Lower Your Overall Risk of Cancer, Study Says

Eating Organic Food Doesn't Lower Your Overall Risk of Cancer, Study Says | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Women who always or mostly eat organic foods have the same likelihood of developing cancer as women who eat conventionally produced foods, according to an Oxford University study.


"Kathryn Bradbury and colleagues in Oxford's Cancer Epidemiology Unit found no evidence that regularly eating a diet that was grown free from pesticides reduced a woman's overall risk of cancer."

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 28, 2014

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Ipilimumab in Advanced Melanoma: Added Benefit for Non-Pretreated Patients Not Proven

Ipilimumab in Advanced Melanoma: Added Benefit for Non-Pretreated Patients Not Proven | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) already assessed the added benefit of ipilimumab in advanced melanoma in 2012. A considerable added benefit was found for patients who had already received previous treatment. In the new dossier compiled by the drug manufacturer, the drug was now compared with the appropriate comparator therapy dacarbazine specified by the Federal Joint Committee (G-BA) also for non-pretreated patients."


Editor's Note: This story is a little confusing, so here is a summary to clarify: It was already known that ipilimumab can be beneficial for people who have received previous treatment for melanoma. A new study aimed to find out if ipilimumab also improves survival for patients who have not received prior treatment. However, for a variety of reasons, the study did not show that ipilimumab performs any better than dacarbazine in patients who have not received prior treatment.

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 18, 2014

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People of Color Need Sun Protection to Avoid Skin Cancer

People of Color Need Sun Protection to Avoid Skin Cancer | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Although skin cancer is less prevalent among people of color than in whites, sun protection and other preventive measures are essential components of skin care in these populations, according to research published online Jan. 30 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology."

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Medical Xpress  |  Feb 14, 2014

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Dramatic Rise in Skin Cancer Among Middle-Aged Adults, Study Shows

"A new Mayo Clinic study found that among middle-aged men and women, 40 to 60 years old, the overall incidence of skin cancer increased nearly eightfold between 1970 and 2009, according to a study published in the January issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.


'" The most striking finding was among women in that age group,' says dermatologist Jerry Brewer, M.D., principal investigator of the study. 'Women between 40 and 50 showed the highest rates of increase we've seen in any group so far.'


"There has been widespread concern in recent years about the rising incidence of melanoma, which affects 75,000 Americans annually and results in nearly 9,000 deaths. Few studies, however, have investigated which age brackets of adults are most at risk."

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ScienceDaily  |  Feb 4, 2014

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Why Today’s Reports About Skin Cancer and Alcohol are Misleading

Why Today’s Reports About Skin Cancer and Alcohol are Misleading | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Let’s be clear – drinking alcohol carries health risks.


"It causes seven different types of cancer. And the more we cut down on alcohol, the more we reduce our risk of the disease.


"But while we’d certainly like people to be more aware of the link between alcohol and cancer, we also believe in good quality evidence. And that’s why today’s newspaper headlines linking drinking and the most serious form of skin cancer, malignant melanoma, bothered us.


"Because the evidence simply isn’t strong enough to link the two."

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Cancer Research UK  |  Jan 29, 2014

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Glucophage Linked to Improved Survival for Cancer Patients with Diabetes

Patients with type 2 diabetes are at higher risk of several cancers. However, patients taking the diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage) have a lower risk of developing some kinds of cancer. Now, a review of several studies suggests that Glucophage also improves survival rates for patients who already have cancer. Patients with cancer and diabetes who took Glucophage had a lower risk of death overall, and of dying of cancer specifically, compared to patients receiving other diabetes medications. It is not certain that Glucophage indeed caused the survival benefit. Separate, independent factors could make patients both more likely to be prescribed Glucophage and to have better survival. However, because there is at least a strong possibility of a benefit, the review authors recommend Glucophage as the drug of choice for diabetes patients with cancer.

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Medscape  |  Nov 25, 2013

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Computer Program Helps Doctors Determine When It’s Time to Test Patients for Cancer

Computer Program Helps Doctors Determine When It’s Time to Test Patients for Cancer | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new computer program may soon help doctors decide whether patients should get tested for cancer based on their symptoms. The software is not meant to replace the physician’s judgment, but rather supplement it, developers say. Many general practitioners do not have specific cancer expertise, or the time to calculate each patient’s cancer risk in detail–a task made instantaneous by the computer program. The software also analyzes each symptom in the context of all other relevant information in a patient’s record–age, sex, smoking status, family history–along with any other symptoms reported during earlier visits. Ensuring timely testing for patients at risk of cancer is a critical step towards early treatment with a higher chance of success.

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Cancer Research UK | Nov 5, 2013

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