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Acral Melanoma Tumors May Require More Aggressive Surgical Treatment

Acral Melanoma Tumors May Require More Aggressive Surgical Treatment | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Acral melanoma was found to have higher recurrence and lower survival rates than other types of melanoma and may require more aggressive surgical intervention, according to researchers.


"The researchers selected patients from a prospectively enrolled cohort of primary melanoma patients at NYU Langone Medical Center; 61 patients with acral melanoma and 183 patients with non-acral melanoma were included. Median follow-up was 33 months in the acral melanoma cohort and 58 months in the non-acral melanoma cohort."

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Healio  |  Jun 11, 2014

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Ipilimumab May Become Standard of Care for Adjuvant Melanoma Therapy

Ipilimumab May Become Standard of Care for Adjuvant Melanoma Therapy | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Two phase 3 trials currently underway are expected to help answer the provocative question of whether ipilimumab will replace interferon as the standard of care for adjuvant therapy in melanoma, according to a presenter at the HemOnc Today Melanoma and Cutaneous Malignancies meeting.


“ 'We really have a new path forward and a new beginning,' Lynn M. Schuchter, MD, chief of the division of hematology/oncology and C. Willard professor of medicine at Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania, said during a presentation. 'I’m hopeful we will advance this therapy further by refining proper patient selection, matching the right biomarkers and modifying toxicities.' "


Editor's note: Clinical trials are research studies done with volunteer patients. Learn more about the risks and advantages of trials for patients here. The clinical trials described in this story are testing the ability of the drug ipilimumab to prevent recurrence in patients who have already been treated for stage III and stage IV melanoma. Interferon is currently the standard of care for so-called 'adjuvant therapy' to prevent recurrence, but ipilimumab may soon replace it.

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Healio  |  Apr 11, 2014

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Genetic Testing Beneficial in Melanoma Treatment

Genetic Testing Beneficial in Melanoma Treatment | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Genetic screening of cancer can help doctors customize treatments so that patients with melanoma have the best chance of beating it, according to the results of a clinical trial by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), a partner with UPMC CancerCenter.


"The trial, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), will be presented Monday at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014. It showed that the cancer immune therapy drug ipilimumab appears most likely to prevent recurrence in patients whose cancer shows high expression of immune-related genes."


Editor's note: To learn more about genetic screening and personalized approaches to melanoma treatment, read our Melanoma Basics.

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Medical Xpress  |  Apr 4, 2014

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Radiation Can Help Keep Desmoplastic Melanomas from Coming Back

Radiation Can Help Keep Desmoplastic Melanomas from Coming Back | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Two new studies suggest that radiotherapy may help control a rare melanoma subtype that rarely spreads, but can recur locally. Called desmoplastic melanoma, this subtype often looks like tiny scars or dimples in the skin. The first study included 130 people with desmoplastic melanoma and found that this cancer came back three times as often in those who only had surgery than in those who also had radiation after surgery (24% vs 7%, respectively). The second study included 277 people with desmoplastic melanoma, and found that surgery failed to remove tumors completely in 35 of them. Of these 35 people, those who also had radiation after surgery were almost twice as likely to remain melanoma-free compared to those who only had surgery (86% vs 46%, respectively).

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HemOnc Today  |  Nov 18, 2013

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Melanoma Can Still Recur when Lymph Nodes Test Clear

Melanoma Can Still Recur when Lymph Nodes Test Clear | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A JAMA Surgery study clarified when melanoma is likely to return in people determined to be cancer-free by sentinel lymph node biopsy. The researchers found that melanoma recurred in 16% of 515 such patients and that 4% of them had tumors in the lymph nodes that had been tested. Recurrence was more likely when the initial tumors were on the head or neck and were deeper (2.7 vs. 1.8 millimeters). Recurrence was less likely in women and in people who were younger when first diagnosed.

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JAMA Surgery | Jan 16, 2012

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Rare Skin Cancer on Palms and Soles More Likely to Come Back Compared to Other Melanomas

Rare Skin Cancer on Palms and Soles More Likely to Come Back Compared to Other Melanomas | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A rare type of melanoma that disproportionately attacks the palms and soles and under the nails of Asians, African-Americans, and Hispanics, who all generally have darker skins, and is not caused by sun exposure, is almost twice as likely to recur than other similar types of skin cancer, according to results of a study in 244 patients.


"The finding about acral lentiginous melanoma, as the potentially deadly cancer is known, is part of a study to be presented May 31 by researchers at the Perlmutter Cancer Center of NYU Langone at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago."

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Medical Xpress  |  May 29, 2014

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Age, Preoperative Size May Predict Subclinical Spread of Melanoma in situ

Age, Preoperative Size May Predict Subclinical Spread of Melanoma in situ | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A patient’s age and the preoperative size of lesions may help predict subclinical spread of melanoma in situ treated with Mohs’ micrographic surgery, according to study results presented at the HemOnc Today Melanoma and Cutaneous Malignancies meeting.


"Patients with melanoma in situ who undergo conventional excision may have residual disease, increasing the likelihood of recurrence and the need for additional surgery. Mohs’ micrographic surgery (MMS) enables improved detection and excision of subclinical microscopic spread, reducing the likelihood of local recurrence and the need for additional surgery, according to background information provided by researchers."

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Healio  |  Apr 13, 2014

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Scalp Melanomas May Come Back More Often

Scalp Melanomas May Come Back More Often | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Melanomas in the scalp may be more even aggressive than those elsewhere, according to a new study. The researchers looked at the outcomes of 250 people who had scalp melanomas in stages I, II or III, and found that they came back in 74 (30%). This recurrence was in the scalp in 23 people, in the neck in 12 people, elsewhere in the body in 22 people, and in more than one place in 17 people. Cautioning that melanomas in the scalp may warrant special clinical consideration, the researchers call for identifying better ways to check for and treat these particularly high-risk skin cancers.

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Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology  |  Dec 26, 2013

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Cancer Patients Need Support to Adopt Healthy Lifestyles

Cancer Patients Need Support to Adopt Healthy Lifestyles | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Healthy lifestyles can benefit people with cancer, reducing recurrence and increasing long-term survival. But that knowledge alone is not enough to make cancer patients start exercising, and stop smoking and drinking, researchers report in the British Journal of Cancer. The study included 5,146 adults from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, and showed that the 433 who got cancer did not adopt healthier habits after diagnosis. Instead, they smoked and drank as much as those without cancer, and exercised even less. The researchers call for figuring out how to help cancer patients make lifestyle changes that can protect their health.

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British Journal of Cancer│May 22, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 23, 2013 2:05 PM

British Journal of Cancer│May 22, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 23, 2013 2:05 PM

British Journal of Cancer│May 22, 2013

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Blood Test Could Predict When Melanomas Will Come Back

A new blood test could show whether melanomas are likely to return in patients who are clinically free of the disease, according to a study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Cancer cells that break off tumors can enter blood vessels and this test identifies three tumor cell biomarkers in blood. The researchers periodically tested blood samples of 322 patients and found those with up to one cancer biomarker were more likely to be melanoma-free compared to those with two or more cancer biomarkers (73% vs. 59%). This test could show which patients would benefit from aggressive treatments.

 

Primary source: http://jco.ascopubs.org/content/30/31/3819.abstract?sid=85400172-d445-4d85-958c-f7bda75450b6

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OncLive | Jan 9, 2013

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