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DNA Shed by Tumors Shows Promise for Non-Invasive Screening and Prognosis

DNA Shed by Tumors Shows Promise for Non-Invasive Screening and Prognosis | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Certain fragments of DNA shed by tumors into the bloodstream can potentially be used to non-invasively screen for early-stage cancers, monitor responses to treatment and help explain why some cancers are resistant to therapies, according to results of an international study led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators.


"Analyzing blood samples from 640 patients with various cancers, the researchers used digital polymerase chain reaction-based technology (a sophisticated method of multiplying and measuring the number DNA molecules) to evaluate how well the DNA fragments predicted the presence of tumors in the patients."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Mar 6, 2014

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, March 6, 2014 2:39 PM

Medical Xpress  |  Mar 6, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, March 6, 2014 2:39 PM

Medical Xpress  |  Mar 6, 2014

Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Lung Cancer Dispatch
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Married Cancer Patients More Likely to Survive

Married Cancer Patients More Likely to Survive | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Married people are 20% less likely to die from cancer, a recent study found. Married patients were less likely to be diagnosed with an advanced stage of the disease and more likely to undergo the best treatment plan for their disease state. Moreover, even at the same cancer stage and undergoing the same treatment, married patients were significantly less likely to die. For several cancers, including prostate and colorectal cancer, the effect of marriage on survival was greater than that of chemotherapy. Several factors may explain these findings. Spouses may remind each other to get regular medical check-ups and encourage each other to stick to their cancer treatments. Social support may also alleviate depression, lower stress, and strengthen the immune system.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Los Angeles Times | Sep 24, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, September 26, 2013 5:45 AM

Los Angeles Times | Sep 24, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, September 26, 2013 12:14 PM

Los Angeles Times | Sep 24, 2013

Tambre Leighn's curator insight, October 14, 2013 2:35 PM

Great news...but what about those who are not married?  How can we turn these findings into tools to increase survival for more people, even if they are single? 

 

Looks like a lot of opportunity for technology based apps that support accountabilty for regular checkups (Keep a Breast Foundation (http://www.keep-a-breast.org/) has a great, free app that is a self-check reminder) and social media like Facebook and peer to peer organizations such as stupidcancer.com for Young Adults, Imerman Angels for survivors and caregivers to help overcome isolation.

 

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The Number of Tumor Cells Spread to Sentinel Lymph Nodes Affects Melanoma Prognosis

The Number of Tumor Cells Spread to Sentinel Lymph Nodes Affects Melanoma Prognosis | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it
Cancer cell spread to the sentinel node -- the lymph node to which cancer cells are most likely to spread from a primary tumor -- is a risk factor for melanoma death. The prognosis of a patient largely depends on the number of disseminated cancer cells per million lymphocytes in the sentinel node. Even very low numbers were found to be predictive for reduced survival.
Cancer Commons's insight:

ScienceDaily  |  Feb 18, 2014

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