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'Feel-Good Hormones' Make Sun Exposure Addictive, Study Suggests

'Feel-Good Hormones' Make Sun Exposure Addictive, Study Suggests | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"When the sun is shining, many of us are unable to resist a trip to the beach to soak up the rays, despite recommendations that we should cover up to reduce the risk of skin cancer. And now, researchers have discovered why; ultraviolet radiation from the sun releases endorphins - "feel-good" hormones - that act like a drug, making exposure to sunlight addictive."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical News Today  |  Jun 20, 2014

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People of Color Need Sun Protection to Avoid Skin Cancer

People of Color Need Sun Protection to Avoid Skin Cancer | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Although skin cancer is less prevalent among people of color than in whites, sun protection and other preventive measures are essential components of skin care in these populations, according to research published online Jan. 30 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology."

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Medical Xpress  |  Feb 14, 2014

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National Poll Shows Public Divided on Genetic Testing to Predict Cancer Risk

National Poll Shows Public Divided on Genetic Testing to Predict Cancer Risk | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A national poll from the University of Utah's Huntsman Cancer Institute shows 34 percent of respondents would not seek genetic testing to predict their likelihood of developing a hereditary cancer – even if the cost of the testing was not an issue.


"Concerns about employment and insurability were cited as the primary reason, even though current laws prohibit such discrimination.

The poll also shows only 35 percent of respondents would be extremely or very likely to seek aggressive prophylactic or preventive treatment, such as a mastectomy, if they had a family history of cancer and genetic testing indicated a genetic pre-disposition to cancer."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Feb 5, 2014

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, February 5, 2014 8:57 PM

Medical Xpress  |  Feb 5, 2014

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Medical Xpress  |  Feb 5, 2014

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Diets Rich in Antioxidant Resveratrol Fail to Reduce Deaths, Heart Disease or Cancer

Diets Rich in Antioxidant Resveratrol Fail to Reduce Deaths, Heart Disease or Cancer | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A study of Italians who consume a diet rich in resveratrol -- the compound found in red wine, dark chocolate and berries -- finds they live no longer than and are just as likely to develop cardiovascular disease or cancer as those who eat or drink smaller amounts of the antioxidant."

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ScienceDaily  |  May 12, 2014

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ScienceDaily  |  May 12, 2014

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ScienceDaily  |  May 12, 2014

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Targeted Intervention Decreased Melanoma Risk, Increased Early Prevention

Targeted Intervention Decreased Melanoma Risk, Increased Early Prevention | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A targeted screening and education strategy aimed at patients at high risk for melanoma favorably affected behaviors that may reduce melanoma risk compared with a standard information-based campaign, according to the results of a recent study published in Annals of Family Medicine.


"General practitioner counseling, combined with a skin examination and a self-assessment tool resulted in patients retaining information about melanoma risk factors and reducing high-risk behaviors."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Cancer Network  |  Feb 7, 2014

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Researchers Call Melanoma Rise an Epidemic

Invasive melanoma rates are 17 times higher in men and 9 times higher in women than they were 60 years ago, according to a new analysis of Connecticut Tumor Registry data from 1950 to 2007. The registry included nearly 20,000 people with melanomas that had spread, as well as more than 3,600 who died from melanoma. Incidence rates rose from about 2 to 33 per 100,000 for men, and from more than 2 to 25 per 100,000 for women. In addition, mortality rates more than tripled in men (from 1.6 to about 5.0 per 100,000) and doubled in women (from 1.3 to 2.6 per 100,000). Calling U.S. melanoma rates an epidemic, the researchers urge targeting high-risk populations with a national prevention and early-detection program. In Germany, a screening program reduced melanoma deaths by 40%.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Journal of Clinical Oncology│Nov 18, 2013

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