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Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Lung Cancer Dispatch
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Timing Cancer Treatment for Maximum Effectiveness

Timing Cancer Treatment for Maximum Effectiveness | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Our bodies follow a 24-hour 'biorhythm' that affects most of our biological functions. This fact forms the basis of cancer chronotherapy, which takes time of day into account to plan cancer treatment. Administering cancer drugs at the right time can double effectiveness while reducing toxicity up to fivefold. However, individual differences in biorhythms mean that the 'right time' varies from one person to another. In a recent study, researchers linked gene expression in mice with the time point at which the chemotherapy agent irinotecan (Camptosar) produced the least toxicity. They developed a mathematical model that predicts each animal's ideal time point based on the expression of two genes. In the future, they hope to develop similar tools to help predict the best time for cancer treatment in human patients.

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Medical Xpress  |  Nov 22, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:13 AM

Medical Xpress  |  Nov 22, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:05 PM

Medical Xpress  |  Nov 22, 2013

Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Colorectal Cancer Dispatch
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Timing of Radiotherapy Could Reduce Hair Loss

Timing of Radiotherapy Could Reduce Hair Loss | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new study suggests that mouse hair operates on a schedule–it grows quickly during the day and slows down at night to repair DNA damage. If human hair behaves similarly, the discovery could help cancer patients avoid an unpleasant side effect of chemotherapy: hair loss. The study found that mice lost 85% of their hair after morning radiation sessions, but just 17% following nighttime sessions; hair cells repaired the inflicted damage overnight. Cancer cells, however, replicate at the same speed regardless of time, so the time of treatment won’t alter its effectiveness. The researchers believe investigating circadian clocks in humans could lead to treatment programs that minimize collateral damage such as hair loss.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical News Today | May 23, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 23, 2013 6:56 PM

Medical News Today | May 23, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 23, 2013 6:58 PM

Medical News Today | May 23, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 23, 2013 6:58 PM

Medical News Today | May 23, 2013