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An Innovative Pain Treatment Will be Tested in One of the Largest Clinical Trials in Cancer Pain

"More than 500 patients who suffer from severe chronic pain related to cancer can participate in one of the largest trials in cancer pain in 145 hospitals spread over 21 countries worldwide.


"Many cancer patients suffer from severe chronic pain related to their cancer. Unfortunately many of these patients are not satisfied with their current treatment options for the management of their pain due to the limitations of these treatments.[1] The German pharmaceutical company Grünenthal is investigating the efficacy and safety of the new analgesic cebranopadol for the treatment of severe chronic pain and peripheral neuropathic pain. Patients suffering from cancer-related severe pain are encouraged to check if they qualify to participate in a large cancer pain phase III trial, the so-called CORAL trial. The CORAL trial aims to show that the investigational drug cebranopadol can provide equally strong analgesia as a standard strong opioid in cancer patients while causing considerably fewer side effects. As the first trial of cebranopadol's phase III clinical program, referred to as the OCEANIC PROGRAM(R), Grünenthal will start the CORAL trial in 145 hospitals spread over 21 countries, including the United Kingdom. More than 500 patients are planned to complete this trial by 2016. More information about the CORAL trial and participating hospitals is available athttp://www.oceanic-program.com."


Editor's note: Clinical trials are research studies with volunteer patients. Learn more about them.

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Medical News Today  |  Jun 11, 2014

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Medical News Today  |  Jun 11, 2014

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Medical News Today  |  Jun 11, 2014

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GW Pharmaceuticals Announces That Sativex Receives Fast Track Designation From FDA in Cancer Pain

"Pharmaceuticals plc (Nasdaq:GWPH) (AIM:GWP) ("GW," "the Company" or "the Group"), a biopharmaceutical company focused on discovering, developing and commercializing novel therapeutics from its proprietary cannabinoid product platform, today announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Fast Track designation to Sativex® for the treatment of pain in patients with advanced cancer, who experience inadequate analgesia during optimized chronic opioid therapy. Sativex is currently in Phase 3 clinical trials for this indication.


"FDA's Fast Track program facilitates the development of drugs intended to treat serious or life‑threatening conditions and that have the potential to address unmet medical needs. A drug program with Fast Track status is afforded greater access to the FDA for the purpose of expediting the drug's development, review and potential approval."

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Nasdaq  |  Apr 28, 2014

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Nasdaq  |  Apr 28, 2014

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Nasdaq  |  Apr 28, 2014

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Steroid Treatment May Improve Cancer-Related Fatigue

Fatigue is a common and often debilitating symptom for people with advanced cancer. A recent clinical trial found that the steroid dexamethasone reduced fatigue in cancer patients who took it for 14 days. Other related symptoms, such as pain and loss of appetite, also improved, as did overall quality of life. However, in a recent survey, only one-quarter to one-third of cancer physicians said that they regularly use steroids to manage cancer-related fatigue. Because steroids can have serious side effects with long-term use, they may be most useful for patients with limited life expectancies or whose fatigue can be expected to resolve after short-term treatment.

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Medscape | Aug 2, 2013

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Medscape | Aug 2, 2013

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Medscape | Aug 2, 2013

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Faster Pain Relief for Cancer Patients Who Need Opioid Pumps

Faster Pain Relief for Cancer Patients Who Need Opioid Pumps | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

People with advanced cancer often spend days of their remaining life in the hospital undergoing trials to calibrate the opioid pumps that relieve their pain. Now there may be a better way to optimize this pain treatment. A new study of 46 cancer patients shows that the proper opioid doses can be calculated. This improves quality of life by hastening pain relief and shortening hospital stays, allowing people to spend more time at home. Opioid doses are calculated based on factors including people’s age, type of cancer, severity of pain, and opioid use before getting the pump.

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Anesthesia & Analgesia│May 29, 2013

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Anesthesia & Analgesia│May 29, 2013

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Radiotherapy Relieves Pain from Bone Tumors in Elderly Patients

Radiotherapy Relieves Pain from Bone Tumors in Elderly Patients | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Cancer that spreads to the bones can cause debilitating pain that is often treated with morphine, an opioid drug that has its own downsides, from grogginess to nausea to constipation. But radiotherapy could lessen the need for morphine among elderly individuals with bone tumors, researchers reported at the 2013 forum of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology. The researchers gave radiotherapy to patients aged 75 years and up whose cancer (primarily breast, lung, or prostate) had spread to their bones. Regular follow-up surveys revealed that a single radiotherapy treatment helped relieve pain. The surveys also showed that despite their physical impairments, the elderly patients treated with radiotherapy were as satisfied with their quality of life as younger patients.

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Medical News Today│Apr 24, 2013

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Medical News Today│Apr 24, 2013

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First Treatment for Pain Caused by Chemotherapy

First Treatment for Pain Caused by Chemotherapy | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Conventional chemotherapy can damage nerves, causing pain and numbness, particularly in the hands and feet. Called neuropathy, this side effect can last months or even years after the completion of chemotherapy and there are currently no effective treatments. A new JAMA study shows that chemotherapy-induced neuropathy can be lessened with a drug called duloxetine (Cymbalta), which has also been shown to alleviate neuropathy in people with diabetes. The new study included 231 people who reported pain of at least 4 (on a scale of 0 to 10) after treatment with oxaliplatin or taxanes such as paclitaxel. Nearly 60% of those treated with duloxetine reported pain relief and those who had been treated with oxaliplatin may have benefited the most.

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Medical Xpress│Apr 2, 2013

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Medical Express│Apr 2, 2013

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Medical Express│Apr 2, 2013

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Focused Ultrasound Reduces Cancer Pain

Focused Ultrasound Reduces Cancer Pain | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"When cancer progresses and spreads to the bone, patients often suffer debilitating pain. Now, a new phase III clinical trial shows that non-invasive magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound treatment that heats the cancer within the bone, relieves pain and improves function for most patients when other treatment options are limited."

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ScienceDaily  |  May 5, 2014

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ScienceDaily  |  May 5, 2014

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ScienceDaily  |  May 5, 2014

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Sorrento Announces Presentation of Data from Clinical Study of Resiniferatoxin for Intractable Cancer Pain at ASRA Meeting - San Francisco Business Times

Sorrento Announces Presentation of Data from Clinical Study of Resiniferatoxin for Intractable Cancer Pain at ASRA Meeting - San Francisco Business Times | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Sorrento Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ: SRNE; Sorrento) a late-stage clinical oncology company developing new treatments for cancer and its associated pain, today announced that investigators from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) presented data highlighting results from the first two dosing cohorts of the Phase I/II trial of resiniferatoxin (RTX) for the treatment of intractable cancer pain. The data were presented at the 39th Annual Regional Anesthesia and Acute Pain Meeting, organized by the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA), in Chicago on April 3, 2014.


"Data from six patients with advanced cancer and severe refractory pain, who received either 13 or 26 mcg injection of RTX into the intrathecal space, showed a clinically meaningful improvement in quality of life following the single injection."

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San Francisco Business Times  |  Apr 4, 2014

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San Francisco Business Times  |  Apr 4, 2014

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San Francisco Business Times  |  Apr 4, 2014

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One Follow-Up Irradiation May Be Enough for Bone Tumor Pain

Radiation can alleviate pain in people with cancers that spread to the bones, but this treatment also has nasty side effects, including vomiting, diarrhea, and lack of appetite. New research suggests that when follow-up radiation is needed, one treatment may relieve pain, as well as several that are spread over different days—and have fewer side effects. Two months into a trial of 850 people with tumors in their bones, participants reported the same pain relief and took the same amount of pain-relieving drugs, whether they had a single follow-up radiation treatment or five to eight treatments. These findings were presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's 2013 meeting.

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Cancer Network│Jun 3, 2013

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Cancer Network│June 3, 2013

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Cancer Network│June 3, 2013

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Experimental Drug Shrinks Many Tumor Types and Decreases Need for Narcotics

Experimental Drug Shrinks Many Tumor Types and Decreases Need for Narcotics | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new immunotherapy drug may shrink many different kinds of cancer tumors, including melanoma, lung, kidney, colorectal, and gastric. Called MPDL3280 and developed by pharmaceutical company Genentech, the drug targets a protein that lets cancer cells evade the immune system. In a phase I study, the new drug shrank tumors in 21% of 140 cancer patients and was most effective on melanoma and lung cancer. The drug also alleviated cancer-related symptoms, decreasing the need for oxygen supplementation and for narcotics to control pain. These results will be presented at the upcoming annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. The study has been expanded to include more kinds of tumors, as well as blood cancers.

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The ASCO Post│May 16, 2013

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Exercise Increases Quality of Life for People with Cancer

Exercise Increases Quality of Life for People with Cancer | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Cancer and its treatment can diminish quality of life, but two recent reviews of past clinical trials show that exercise can help restore a sense of well-being in both cancer patients and survivors. Measures of quality of life included fatigue, anxiety, and pain, while types of exercise included walking, bicycling, and yoga. The first review looked at 56 trials with a total of 4,826 people who were undergoing cancer treatment. This review showed, for example, that exercise reduced anxiety, fatigue, and sleep disturbances and that the more intense the exercise, the greater the benefits. The second review examined 40 trials with a total of 3,500 people who had completed cancer treatment. This review showed, for example, that people who exercised were less worried and felt less fatigue and pain. They also had better self images, which is key to avoiding the social isolation that can come with changes in appearance due to cancer treatments.

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Medical Xpress│Apr 5, 2013

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Medical Xpress│Apr 5, 2013