Melanoma Dispatch
Follow
Find tag "nivolumab"
2.1K views | +6 today
News for Patients and Physicians
Curated by Cancer Commons
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Japan Approves World's First PD-1 Drug, Nivolumab

Japan Approves World's First PD-1 Drug, Nivolumab | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Ono Pharmaceutical Co has become the first company in the world to get an approval for a PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor, as regulators in Japan gave the green light to nivolumab, developed with Bristol-Myers Squibb, as a treatment for melanoma.

"The drug will be marketed as Opdivo for unresectable melanoma although Ono noted that because of the very limited number of patients treated with nivolumab in Japanese clinical trials, the firm is required to perform a 'post-marketing use-results survey covering all cases until data on a certain minimum number of patients have been accumulated'."


Editor's note: The drug nivolumab is an immunotherapy, meaning that it boosts a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. Nivolumab is a specific kind of immunotherapy drug known as a "PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor," since it works by releasing a protein "brake" on the immune system called PD-1. Researchers testing the drug in volunteer patients have found promising results, and Japan has now given the world's first approval to nivolumab, permitting doctors across the country to prescribe it to people with unresectable melanoma.

Cancer Commons's insight:

PharmaTimes  |  Jul 7, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

ASCO: Targeting PD-1 Works in Advanced Melanoma

ASCO: Targeting PD-1 Works in Advanced Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Two studies indicate that using investigative immunotherapy drugs improves survival and response in patients with metastatic melanoma, researchers said here.


"In one study, the agent pembrolizumab (MK-3475) which targets the programmed death (PD-1) pathway produced a 1-year 69% survival rate, said Antoni Ribas, MD, PhD, professor of medicine at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center in Los Angeles.


"In a second study reported in a press conference at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Mario Sznol, MD, professor of medicine at the Yale Cancer Center, demonstrated that a combination of the investigative PD-1 inhibitor nivolumab in combination with another targeted agent ipilimumab (Yervoy) produced a 1-year survival rate of 85% and 2-year survival rate of 79% for advanced melanoma patients."


Editor's note: Immunotherapy drugs boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. Promising research into new immunotherapy drugs for melanoma was recently presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting. Two treatments that received special attention were MK-3475 (aka pembrolizumab) and a combination of the drugs ipilimumab (Yervoy) and nivolumab.

Cancer Commons's insight:

MedPage Today  |  Jun 5, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Long-Term Results Encouraging for Combination Immunotherapy for Advanced Melanoma

Long-Term Results Encouraging for Combination Immunotherapy for Advanced Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The first long-term follow-up results from a phase 1b immunotherapy trial combining drugs for advanced melanoma patients has shown encouraging results—long-lasting with high survival rates—researchers report. First author Mario Sznol, M.D., professor of medical oncology at Yale Cancer Center, is presenting the updated data at the 2014 annual conference of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago.


"Sznol, clinical research leader of the melanoma research program at Yale Cancer Center, was the senior author on the original study of combination immunotherapy that was first published in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at ASCO in 2013. Jedd Wolchok, M.D., of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center was first author of the earlier study, and senior author of this updated research."


Editor's note: Immunotherapy treatments boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. This story describes a promising treatment that combines two immunotherapy drugs: nivolumab and ipilimumab (Yervoy).

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Jun 2, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

At Last, Success Seen in Fighting Cancer with the Immune System

At Last, Success Seen in Fighting Cancer with the Immune System | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Fundamental research -- much of it done in Boston -- has led to a shift in the scientific strategy for fighting some cancers, toward using drugs to activate a patient’s own immune system. An approach that was on the fringes of cancer therapy is suddenly the hottest trend in cancer drug development. On Monday, for example, Boston researchers presented data showing that nearly half of patients with advanced melanoma lived for two years after getting an experimental immune therapy called nivolumab, though multiple other therapies hadn’t worked for them. And drug companies have announced several deals recently to acquire companies developing immunotherapies. The frenzy of activity is an abrupt change for a field that had made big promises but failed to deliver for years."

Cancer Commons's insight:

The Boston Globe  |  Mar 10, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

New Immunotherapy Is Promising in Early Trial

New Immunotherapy Is Promising in Early Trial | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Blocking a protein that protects tumor cells may shrink melanomas, according to results from an ongoing trial that were presented at the 10th International Congress of the Society for Melanoma Research in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Called PD-L1, the protein shields tumor cells from the immune system and it can be blocked by a drug called MPDL3280A. The phase I trial included 45 people with melanoma who were treated with the PD-L1 blocker, and tumors shrank in one-third of them. This PD-L1 blocker is also being tested in a phase I trial in combination with the BRAF inhibitor drug vemurafenib, as well as in several phase II trials against renal cell carcinoma and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In addition, two drugs similar to this PD-L1 blocker (nivolumab and MK-3475) are being tested in phase III trials against melanoma.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Cancer Network│Nov 19, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Experimental Melanoma Immunotherapy Continues to Hold Promise

In keeping with results from other studies, new research supports treating melanomas with the experimental immunotherapy nivolumab. This drug blocks a protein—called PD-1—that lets tumor cells evade the immune system. In a phase I clinical trial, nivolumab shrank tumors in 25% of 90 people with melanomas that had spread. Some of these tumors had not responded to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved immunotherapy ipilimumab. In addition, some tumors that did not respond to nivolumab did respond to ipilimumab. Taken together, these findings suggest that melanomas could be treated with these two drugs either in combination or sequentially.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Journal of Clinical Oncology │Oct 20, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Nivolumab Extends Life in Melanoma Patients in Early Trial

Nivolumab Extends Life in Melanoma Patients in Early Trial | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

An experimental immunotherapy drug called nivolumab may increase survival in people with melanomas that have spread. Nivolumab blocks a protein called PD-1, which lets tumor cells evade the immune system. In a phase I trial of melanoma patients who had not responded to previous treatments, researchers found tumors shrank in 41% of those given the highest dose of nivolumab (3 mg/kg). Overall, 62% survived to 1 year and 43% survived to 2 years and only 2% had severe side effects. Nivolumab is currently being tested in three phase III trials. These findings were among several advances in immunotherapy treatments for melanoma presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's 2013 meeting.

Cancer Commons's insight:

OncLive│Jun 2, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

UPDATE 1-Bristol Immunotherapy Prolongs Survival in Melanoma Trial

"A late-stage trial testing Bristol-Myers Squibb Co's cancer immunotherapy nivolumab in advanced melanoma patients was halted early after it was determined that the drug was likely to prolong survival, the company said on Tuesday..."


"The 418-patient Phase III study, called CheckMate -066, was testing nivolumab as an initial, or first line, therapy for patients with advanced melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer."


Editor's note: In a clinical trial with volunteer melanoma patients, researchers have been testing a new drug called nivolumab to see if it is a good first treatment for people with advanced melanoma. Nivolumab is an immunotherapy, meaning that it boosts a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. In the clinical trial, some of the patients were being treated with nivolumab, and some with a standard chemotherapy drug called dacarbazine. Nivolumab showed so much better results than dacarbazine that the trial was ended early, and the patients who had been taking dacarbazine were switched to nivolumab.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Reuters  |  Jun 24, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Ipilimumab Nivolumab Combination Demonstrated Encouraging Activity in Advanced Melanoma

Ipilimumab Nivolumab Combination Demonstrated Encouraging Activity in Advanced Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The combination of the immunotherapy agents ipilimumab and nivolumab induced extensive and durable tumor shrinkage in patients with advanced melanoma, according to long-term study results presented at the ASCO Annual Meeting.

“ 'These are two distinct immune checkpoint inhibitors, so it makes sense to combine them together,' researcher Mario Sznol, MD, a professor of medical oncology at Yale School of Medicine, said during a press conference. 'They both produce very significant clinical activity as monotherapy in advanced melanoma.' ”

Editor's note: Immunotherapy treatments boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. A new immunotherapy treatment combines two individual immunotherapy drugs: ipilimumab (Yervoy) and nivolumab. In a clinical trial to test the combo in volunteer patients with advanced melanoma, the treatment was found to provide promising survival results. Further studies are needed to see just how well the treatment might work.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Healio  |  Jun 4, 2012

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

10 Issues to Consider During National Skin Cancer Awareness Month

10 Issues to Consider During National Skin Cancer Awareness Month | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Accounting for approximately half of all cancers in the United States, skin cancer is widely recognized as the most common cause of cancer nationwide. More than 3.5 million cases of skin cancer are diagnosed each year, and according to the Skin Cancer Foundation, incidences of skin cancer outnumber all combined cases of breast, colon, lung and prostate cancers.


"With the month of May designated as National Skin Cancer Awareness Month, HemOnc Today highlights 10 issues for oncologists and dermatologists to consider for their patients, as well as the new guideline revisions and research regarding the identification, treatment and management of patients with melanoma and skin cancer."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Healio  |  May 15, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Experimental Drug Helps Body Fight Advanced Melanoma

Experimental Drug Helps Body Fight Advanced Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"An experimental drug that harnesses the power of the body's immune system to fight cancer has helped some patients with advanced melanoma keep their disease in check for several years, a new study indicates.


"Researchers think the drug, which is called nivolumab, may help reset the immune systemso that as a tumor adds new cells, the immune system is able to clear them away."


Editor's Note: The Medical Xpress article contains a misleading statement about Yervoy (ipilimumab). The article says, "up to 49 percent of patients were still alive after one year and up to 33 percent of patients were still alive two years after taking [Yervoy]." In fact, only about 10-20% of all patients who take Yervoy experience tumor shrinkage, and 49% of those are still alive after 1 year. The response rates to nivolumab are more promising.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Mar 3, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

PD-1 Blocker Extends Life in People with Melanoma in Early Trial

PD-1 Blocker Extends Life in People with Melanoma in Early Trial | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

An experimental immunotherapy may keep people with melanoma alive for up to 1 year, according to findings presented at the 2013 International Congress of the Society for Melanoma Research in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The drug (MK-3475) blocks a protein, called PD-1, that lets cancer cells evade the immune system. Researchers treated 135 people with MK-3475 and found that tumors shrank in 40% and disappeared in 9%. Altogether, this drug is being tested in more than 3,000 people with melanoma or breast, bladder, colorectal, or lung cancer. In addition, another experimental PD-1 blocker called nivolumab is being tested alone and in combination with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved Yervoy (ipilimumab) against melanoma and blood, breast, gastric, kidney, liver, lung, and pancreatic cancers.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Bloomberg | Nov 18, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Ipilimumab Gives Some Melanoma Patients 10 More Years

People with melanomas that have spread can live as long as a decade when treated with the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved immunotherapy drug Yervoy (ipilimumab), according to a report at a cancer conference in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Ipilimumab activates the immune system's attack on tumor cells, which is normally inhibited. The researchers evaluated 12 ipilimumab trials totaling more than 1,800 people with melanoma, making this the largest follow-up skin cancer study ever. They found that 22% survived at 3 years and 17% survived at 7 years and were still alive at up to 10 years. Now, Yervoy manufacturer Bristol-Myers is testing the combination of ipilimumab with an experimental immunotherapy drug called nivolumab, which blocks a protein (PD-1) that lets tumor cells evade the immune system. So far, the combo treatment outperforms ipilimumab alone in an early trial, extending life to a year in 82% of 53 people with melanoma.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Bloomberg│Sep 27, 2013

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Two Immune System Boosters May Be Better Than One for Melanoma

Two Immune System Boosters May Be Better Than One for Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A phase I clinical trial suggests that the combination of two immunotherapy drugs—ipilimumab and nivolumab—may shrink melanomas far more than either does alone. Ipilimumab is the standard melanoma treatment in much of the world; nivolumab is an experimental drug developed by the pharmaceutical firm Bristol-Myers Squibb. The researchers treated 52 melanoma patients with the combination and found that tumors shrank in about half of them. This shrinkage exceeded 80% in nearly one-third of the patients. These results will be presented at the upcoming annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and a phase III trial of the combination ipilimumab/nivolumab treatment is scheduled to start in June 2013.

Cancer Commons's insight:

The ASCO Post│May 16, 2013

more...
No comment yet.