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Dicerna Pharmaceuticals Initiates Phase 1 Study of DCR-MYC in
Patients with Solid Tumors and Hematological Malignancies

Dicerna Pharmaceuticals Initiates Phase 1 Study of DCR-MYC in <br/>      Patients with Solid Tumors and Hematological Malignancies | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Dicerna Pharmaceuticals, Inc. DRNA +0.67% , a leader in the development of RNAi-based therapeutics, today announced the initiation of a Phase 1 dose-escalating clinical study of DCR-MYC, (also known as DCR-M1711), in patients with solid tumors, multiple myeloma, or lymphoma. DCR-MYC, Dicerna’s first drug candidate to enter clinical testing, is a Dicer Substrate siRNA (DsiRNA) that targets the driver oncogene MYC, which is central to the growth of many hematologic and solid tumor malignancies. Dicerna is investigating DCR-MYC in a variety of tumor types with the initial focus on hepatocellular carcinoma."


Editor's note: This new drug may hold promise for people with lung cancer or melanoma, as well as other cancer types.

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MarketWatch  |  Apr 16, 2014

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 18, 2014 2:29 PM

MarketWatch  |  Apr 16, 2014

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Myc-Driven Tumors Could be Next for Targeted Therapies

Myc-Driven Tumors Could be Next for Targeted Therapies | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Scientists have made a breakthrough in inhibiting the tumor-driving protein myc, which previously had been impossible to target with drugs. Myc drives cells toward uncontrolled growth in tumors, and is involved in many of the most serious forms of cancer, including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, brain cancer, prostate cancer, and blood cancer. Scientists have found that one drug that indirectly targets myc slows tumor growth in a mouse model of myc-driven cancer. The key to the breakthrough was recognizing that myc relies partially on MTOR, another protein, for its protein supply. By targeting MTOR, the drug keeps myc from promoting tumor growth. The drug, called MLN0128, is already in clinical trials for a variety of cancers, but this is the first time it has been viewed as a tool to treat myc-driven cancer. The researchers said that other indirect targeted therapy drugs are already being tested in human studies to treat myc-driven tumors.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Science Daily | Jul 19, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 19, 2013 2:39 PM

Science Daily | Jul 19, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 19, 2013 6:11 PM

Science Daily | Jul 19, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 19, 2013 6:11 PM

Science Daily | Jul 19, 2013