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Sex, Age, Race Affected SCC Risk Among Melanoma Patients

Sex, Age, Race Affected SCC Risk Among Melanoma Patients | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Approximately 12% of patients with melanoma developed subsequent squamous cell carcinoma, and the occurrence was more common among men, whites, older patients and those with a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer, according to recent study results.


"Researchers studied 6,378 Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) members (mean age, 60.9 years; 56.6% men) who received a melanoma diagnosis between 2000 and 2005. The patients were followed through 2009, with 1,462 meeting criteria for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) pathology review. There were 766 patients with defined SCC (69.7% men)."

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Healio  |  Jun 2, 2014

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Reducing the Risk of Melanoma in Young Men

Reducing the Risk of Melanoma in Young Men | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Young men are 55% more likely to die of melanoma than young women, according to a recent study that followed more than 25,000 white adolescents and young adults with melanoma. About 95% of skin melanomas occur in non-Hispanic whites. The disparity between the sexes held across melanomas matched for thickness, suggesting a biological basis. But even so, young men can reduce their risk with sun protection and skin checks. Another large study suggested that using sunscreen regularly could cut the incidence of melanoma by half. In addition, men are less likely to get skin checks and young adults are less likely to go to doctors, period. Dermatologists recommend professional skin exams for people with changing moles or 'ugly duckling' moles, which don't match the others. Ugly duckling moles tend to grow up, can be small and uniform in color, and may bleed.

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The ASCO Post│Aug 15, 2013

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Combo Chemotherapy Bests Single Drug Against Melanoma

Combo Chemotherapy Bests Single Drug Against Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Two chemotherapy drugs may be better than one against melanoma, according to results from an ongoing clinical trial that were presented at the 2013 meeting of the  International Society for Melanoma Research. The drugs were dacarbazine, which is U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for melanoma, and paclitaxel, which is FDA-approved for breast, lung, and pancreatic cancers. In a phase III trial of 529 melanoma patients, the drug combination kept tumors from growing two times longer than dacarbazine alone (4.8 vs 2.5 months, respectively). The subgroups that did best included men and people with melanomas that had spread to the liver or brain. This is particularly encouraging for the latter group because they have the worst prognosis.

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HemOnc Today │ Nov 21, 2013

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Melanoma Hits Men Harder Than Women at Young Ages, Too

Melanoma Hits Men Harder Than Women at Young Ages, Too | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Older men are less likely to survive melanoma than women; new research shows that the same holds for younger men. Melanoma is the third most common cancer in adolescents and young adults. The researchers followed 26,000 white individuals aged 15 to 39 years who had skin melanomas. About 7 years after diagnosis, men were 55% more likely to die than women of same ages and melanoma thicknesses. Moreover, even though melanomas less than 1 mm thick are linked to lower risk, men with these thin melanomas were twice as likely to die as women of the same age. The researchers call for more outreach to alert young men to their heightened risk of melanoma and for more research to find out why.

Cancer Commons's insight:

JAMA Dermatology│Jun 26, 2013

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