Melanoma Dispatch
Follow
Find tag "lymphoma"
2.1K views | +0 today
News for Patients and Physicians
Curated by Cancer Commons
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

New Targetable Protein Linked to Melanoma Spread

New Targetable Protein Linked to Melanoma Spread | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

New research suggests that melanomas are more likely to spread in people whose sentinel lymph nodes (SNLs) contain a particular subtype of white blood cells (lymphocytes). The researchers studied 42 people with melanoma, and found that tumors were more likely to spread within five years when their SNL lymphocytes had a surface protein called CD30. Moreover, this lymphocyte type was also more common in the blood of 25 people with advanced melanoma. These findings suggest that CD30 could be a target from treating melanoma, which is encouraging because the FDA has already approved a drug (brentuximab vedotin or Adcetris) that targets this protein for lymphoma treatment.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Cancer Research │Jan 1, 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

Tumor-shrinking Drug Moves to Clinical Trials

Tumor-shrinking Drug Moves to Clinical Trials | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Last year, a PNAS study showed that the surfaces of many tumor cells have a protein called CD47, which protects them from the immune system. But when these tumors are treated with a drug that inhibits CD47, they get attacked by immune system cells. The researchers transplanted seven kinds of human tumors into mice and treated them with the CD47-targeting drug. All of the tumors—bladder, brain, breast, colon, liver, ovary, and prostate—shrank or disappeared, which kept them from spreading. Now, the research will progress to clinical trials, thanks to a $20 million grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine. CD47 was originally found on leukemia and lymphoma cells; the initial trial will target the stem cells that perpetuate acute myeloid leukemia. This cancer of the blood and bone marrow is fatal within months if untreated, and the 5-year survival rate is only 30% to 40%, even with aggressive treatments including chemotherapy and bone marrow transplants.


Cancer Commons's insight:

Huffington Post Healthy Living│Apr 3, 2013

more...
Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 3, 2013 9:21 PM

Huffington Post Healthy Living│Apr 3, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 3, 2013 9:21 PM

Huffington Post Healthy Living│Apr 3, 2013

Suggested by Cancer Commons
Scoop.it!

New Treatment Extends Immunotherapy in Mice, Now in Clinical Trial

New Treatment Extends Immunotherapy in Mice, Now in Clinical Trial | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Cancer treatments that make the immune system attack tumor cells often stop working after a while. This is because cells (called T regulatory cells) that protect our bodies from the immune system also end up protecting our tumors. New research shows that blocking T regulatory cells with antibodies extends immunotherapy in mice implanted with human lymphoma tumors. The researchers injected tumors with a mix of these antibodies and an immune system booster called CpG and found that treating just one tumor was enough to control tumors elsewhere, too. This could help treat tumors in the central nervous system, which can be hard to reach with conventional therapies. A clinical trial of the new treatment is underway for people with colon cancer, lymphoma, or melanoma and is currently recruiting participants.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress│June 10, 2013

more...
No comment yet.