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Experimental Leukaemia Drug Boosts Immune Response Against Other Cancers

Experimental Leukaemia Drug Boosts Immune Response Against Other Cancers | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Experimental drugs being tested in clinical trials for leukaemia may also boost the body’s immune response against other forms of cancer, according to research from University College London (UCL).


"The drugs target an important protein called p110δ, produced in large amounts in white blood cells called ‘leukocytes’.


"Leukaemias can develop if leukocytes become cancerous, making p110δ a promising target for treating this form of cancer.


"And recent clinical trials using these drugs have shown encouraging results. But until now the potential benefit of these drugs for other types of cancer had remained unexplored.


"In the latest study, published in Nature, researchers working with mice bearing solid tumours found that the drugs - called p110δ inhibitors - helped boost their immune response against a range of tumour types – including breast cancer."


Editor's note: Scientists have tested new drugs in mice with a variety of tumor types, including breast cancer, and found that the drugs may help the mice fight off cancer. These drugs are already being used in humans in clinical trials for leukemia, so it might not be long before scientists try the drugs in volunteer patients with other types of cancer.

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Cancer Research UK  |  Jun 11, 2014

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Cancer Research UK  |  Jun 11, 2014

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Cancer Research UK  |  Jun 11, 2014

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How to Control Other Cancers Caused by Targeted Treatments for Melanoma

While effective against melanomas with BRAF mutations, BRAF inhibitors can also cause other cancers such as squamous cell carcinoma and RAS-mutant leukemia. In an overview of the field, researchers say that people treated with BRAF inhibitors may need long-term follow-ups. The researchers also suggest combining BRAF inhibitors with treatments that target the other cancers. These include MEK inhibitors, which control some but not all of the other cancers. In addition, people treated with BRAF inhibitors may need more aggressive screening if they have a family history of colorectal cancer.


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Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology│Aug 14, 2013

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First Report that Vemurafenib Can Trigger Leukemia

A melanoma patient treated with vemurafenib also developed leukemia temporarily, according to a case report in The New England Journal of Medicine. This drug was already known to cause squamous cell skin cancers in some people with melanomas that have BRAF mutations. Vemurafenib activates proteins called extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK), which are involved in cell division and can lead to cancer in cells that have RAS mutations. The leukemia in the vemurafenib-treated patient had a RAS mutation and disappeared after treatment ended. The patient’s melanoma tumors, which did not have a RAS mutation, shrank during treatment.

 

Primary source: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1208958

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MedPage Today | Nov 8, 2012

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Cost of Cancer Drugs Strongly Affects Treatment Adherence

Cost of Cancer Drugs Strongly Affects Treatment Adherence | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A study of over 1,500 cancer patients showed that drug costs have a significant effect on whether patients stick to their treatment plan. The study’s subjects had been prescribed imatinib (Gleevec), a treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia, a type of blood cancer. Patients with higher co-payments were 42% more likely to skip doses and 70% percent more likely to stop taking Gleevec entirely. Missing only 15% of prescribed Gleevec doses significantly raises the chance of the cancer developing drug resistance and relapsing. The study also found drastic differences in out-of-pocket treatment costs, with co-payments ranging from nothing to $4,792 for a 30-day supply of Gleevec. The average co-payment amount more than doubled over the 9-year course of the study.

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UNC Health Care  |  Jan 6, 2014

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UNC Health Care  |  Jan 6, 2014

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UNC Health Care  |  Jan 6, 2014

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Tumor-shrinking Drug Moves to Clinical Trials

Tumor-shrinking Drug Moves to Clinical Trials | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Last year, a PNAS study showed that the surfaces of many tumor cells have a protein called CD47, which protects them from the immune system. But when these tumors are treated with a drug that inhibits CD47, they get attacked by immune system cells. The researchers transplanted seven kinds of human tumors into mice and treated them with the CD47-targeting drug. All of the tumors—bladder, brain, breast, colon, liver, ovary, and prostate—shrank or disappeared, which kept them from spreading. Now, the research will progress to clinical trials, thanks to a $20 million grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine. CD47 was originally found on leukemia and lymphoma cells; the initial trial will target the stem cells that perpetuate acute myeloid leukemia. This cancer of the blood and bone marrow is fatal within months if untreated, and the 5-year survival rate is only 30% to 40%, even with aggressive treatments including chemotherapy and bone marrow transplants.


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Huffington Post Healthy Living│Apr 3, 2013

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Huffington Post Healthy Living│Apr 3, 2013

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Huffington Post Healthy Living│Apr 3, 2013