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Ipilimumab May Become Standard of Care for Adjuvant Melanoma Therapy

Ipilimumab May Become Standard of Care for Adjuvant Melanoma Therapy | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Two phase 3 trials currently underway are expected to help answer the provocative question of whether ipilimumab will replace interferon as the standard of care for adjuvant therapy in melanoma, according to a presenter at the HemOnc Today Melanoma and Cutaneous Malignancies meeting.


“ 'We really have a new path forward and a new beginning,' Lynn M. Schuchter, MD, chief of the division of hematology/oncology and C. Willard professor of medicine at Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania, said during a presentation. 'I’m hopeful we will advance this therapy further by refining proper patient selection, matching the right biomarkers and modifying toxicities.' "


Editor's note: Clinical trials are research studies done with volunteer patients. Learn more about the risks and advantages of trials for patients here. The clinical trials described in this story are testing the ability of the drug ipilimumab to prevent recurrence in patients who have already been treated for stage III and stage IV melanoma. Interferon is currently the standard of care for so-called 'adjuvant therapy' to prevent recurrence, but ipilimumab may soon replace it.

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Healio  |  Apr 11, 2014

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Advances in Immunotherapy Brighten Prospects for People with Cancer

Advances in Immunotherapy Brighten Prospects for People with Cancer | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

The enthusiasm for anticancer immunotherapies continues to build, with two treatments already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and clinical trials underway for a variety of promising new candidates. The latest approaches include targeting a protein called PD-L1, which shields tumor cells from immune system attacks. In a phase I clinical trial of a PD-L1 blocker made by MedImmune, early results suggest that this treatment shrinks melanomas as well as kidney, lung, and colon tumors. Next, the researchers hope to open this trial to people with head and neck cancers as well. Another approach entails adding the gene for an immune system booster (interferon beta) to a therapeutic virus (vesicular stomatitis virus) that kills cancer cells, but not normal ones. This treatment is being tested on liver cancer in a phase I trial and early results are encouraging.

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The Miami Herald│Jul 26, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, August 2, 2013 5:37 PM

The Miami Herald│Jul 26, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, August 2, 2013 5:37 PM

The Miami Herald│Jul 26, 2013

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Early, High-Dose Interferon Fails to Stop Melanoma

Early, High-Dose Interferon Fails to Stop Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new study has dashed hopes that high doses of interferon given early on would be enough to curb melanoma. In a phase II clinical trial of about 200 people with melanomas that had not begun to spread, researchers treated half with high-dose interferon every day for a month and the other half with the same high-dose interferon regimen followed by 48 weeks of "maintenance" doses of this immune response-boosting protein. Maintenance doses are typically about 50% lower and are given three times a week instead of daily. The researchers found that the latter group did better, living longer without recurrence as well as surviving longer overall. The latter year-long interferon treatment is standard in the US and Australia, while lower doses of interferon are more commonly used in Europe, says an accompanying editorial.

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Journal of Clinical Oncology  |  Dec 16, 2013

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First Evidence That the Immune System Can Halt Cancer Progession Permanently

First Evidence That the Immune System Can Halt Cancer Progession Permanently | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

New research in Nature shows that the immune system can control tumors permanently without destroying cells. The researchers treated cancers with two proteins that activate the immune system (interferon-g and tumor necrosis factor) and found that the combination kept tumors from growing by making the cells dormant. This work could ultimately lead to cancer treatments that are both effective and free of side effects, suggesting that we shift from the "War on Cancer" strategy of killing tumor cells to focus instead on restoring the body’s innate ability to arrest tumor development.

 

Image: The red staining reveals treated melanoma cells that are no longer growing.

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Science Daily | Feb 1, 2013

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