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Japan Approves World's First PD-1 Drug, Nivolumab

Japan Approves World's First PD-1 Drug, Nivolumab | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Ono Pharmaceutical Co has become the first company in the world to get an approval for a PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor, as regulators in Japan gave the green light to nivolumab, developed with Bristol-Myers Squibb, as a treatment for melanoma.

"The drug will be marketed as Opdivo for unresectable melanoma although Ono noted that because of the very limited number of patients treated with nivolumab in Japanese clinical trials, the firm is required to perform a 'post-marketing use-results survey covering all cases until data on a certain minimum number of patients have been accumulated'."


Editor's note: The drug nivolumab is an immunotherapy, meaning that it boosts a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. Nivolumab is a specific kind of immunotherapy drug known as a "PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor," since it works by releasing a protein "brake" on the immune system called PD-1. Researchers testing the drug in volunteer patients have found promising results, and Japan has now given the world's first approval to nivolumab, permitting doctors across the country to prescribe it to people with unresectable melanoma.

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PharmaTimes  |  Jul 7, 2014

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UPDATE 1-Bristol Immunotherapy Prolongs Survival in Melanoma Trial

"A late-stage trial testing Bristol-Myers Squibb Co's cancer immunotherapy nivolumab in advanced melanoma patients was halted early after it was determined that the drug was likely to prolong survival, the company said on Tuesday..."


"The 418-patient Phase III study, called CheckMate -066, was testing nivolumab as an initial, or first line, therapy for patients with advanced melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer."


Editor's note: In a clinical trial with volunteer melanoma patients, researchers have been testing a new drug called nivolumab to see if it is a good first treatment for people with advanced melanoma. Nivolumab is an immunotherapy, meaning that it boosts a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. In the clinical trial, some of the patients were being treated with nivolumab, and some with a standard chemotherapy drug called dacarbazine. Nivolumab showed so much better results than dacarbazine that the trial was ended early, and the patients who had been taking dacarbazine were switched to nivolumab.

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Reuters  |  Jun 24, 2014

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ASCO: Targeting PD-1 Works in Advanced Melanoma

ASCO: Targeting PD-1 Works in Advanced Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Two studies indicate that using investigative immunotherapy drugs improves survival and response in patients with metastatic melanoma, researchers said here.


"In one study, the agent pembrolizumab (MK-3475) which targets the programmed death (PD-1) pathway produced a 1-year 69% survival rate, said Antoni Ribas, MD, PhD, professor of medicine at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center in Los Angeles.


"In a second study reported in a press conference at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Mario Sznol, MD, professor of medicine at the Yale Cancer Center, demonstrated that a combination of the investigative PD-1 inhibitor nivolumab in combination with another targeted agent ipilimumab (Yervoy) produced a 1-year survival rate of 85% and 2-year survival rate of 79% for advanced melanoma patients."


Editor's note: Immunotherapy drugs boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. Promising research into new immunotherapy drugs for melanoma was recently presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting. Two treatments that received special attention were MK-3475 (aka pembrolizumab) and a combination of the drugs ipilimumab (Yervoy) and nivolumab.

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MedPage Today  |  Jun 5, 2014

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Celldex Therapeutics' Varlilumab Continues to Demonstrate Very Favorable Profile

Celldex Therapeutics' Varlilumab Continues to Demonstrate Very Favorable Profile | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Celldex Therapeutics, Inc. (Nasdaq:CLDX) today reported data from its ongoing Phase 1 study of the fully human monoclonal antibody varlilumab (CDX-1127) in cancer. Varlilumab is an immunotherapy designed to enhance the body's natural immune response by directly activating T cells that can specifically recognize and kill cancer cells. Preclinical data support the broad study of varlilumab in combination with a number of other anti-cancer agents including but not limited to checkpoint inhibitors, chemotherapies, targeted therapies and vaccines. Varlilumab will enter at least four combination studies in the second half of 2014."


Editor's note: As mentioned above, varlilumab is an immunotherapy that works by boosting a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. In a clinical trial testing the drug in volunteer patients, it shown promise for treating several different types of cancer, including metastatic melanoma.

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Celldex  |  Jun 2, 2014

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Varlilumab shows clinical activity in Phase I trial.

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OncoSec Medical Presents Positive Phase 2 Interim Data Evaluating ImmunoPulse in Melanoma

"OncoSec Medical Inc. (OTCQB: ONCS), a company developing its ImmunoPulse DNA-based intratumoral cancer immunotherapy, announced interim data from its Phase 2 melanoma study at the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s (ASCO) 50th Annual Meeting in Chicago. The abstract, titled “Systemic anti-tumor effect and clinical response in a Phase 2 trial of intratumoral electroporation of plasmid interleukin-12 in patients with advanced melanoma” (ASCO Abstract #9025), was presented by Adil Daud, M.D., OncoSec’s Chief Clinical Strategist and Principal Investigator of the Phase 2 melanoma study, and selected for discussion during a poster highlights session for melanoma/skin cancers led by Axel Hauschild, M.D., Ph.D."


Editor's note: This article describes a promising immunotherapy treatment that boosts a patient's own immune system to fight melanoma. 

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Yahoo! Finance  |  Jun 2, 2014

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Business: Washington Post Business Page, Business News

"Kim Sherman was in bad shape a year ago after a lemon-sized melanoma tumor in her pelvis stopped responding to standard targeted therapy. By late June 2013, the pain from the mass pressing on her hamstring became so bad she could hardly sleep, walk, or even sit down.

"Then she joined a trial on an experimental drug from Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. designed to boost the immune system against her tumor when used in combination with the company’s existing immune enhancing drug Yervoy. Within three weeks the pain started to subside, and within three months later the tumor disappeared. Her doctor at Yale Cancer Center in New Haven may stop therapy entirely in a few weeks, she said."

Editor's note: This article discusses immunotherapy treatments, which boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. Learn more about immunotherapy for melanoma in The Basics.

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The Washington Post  |  Jun 2, 2014

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Immunotherapy Shows Promise Against Melanoma

Immunotherapy Shows Promise Against Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"By unleashing the immune system to attack skin cancer, researchers have made important strides against melanoma, according to the results of three clinical trials released Monday.


"The first study presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting showed patients given a drug called Yervoy (ipilimumab), made by Bristol Myers-Squibb, saw a 25 percent reduced risk of the cancer coming back when compared to a placebo."


Editor's note: Immunotherapy treatments, which boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer, were a big topic this past weekend at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting. This article provides an overview of some new findings in immunotherapy for melanoma.

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 2, 2014

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Long-Term Results Encouraging for Combination Immunotherapy for Advanced Melanoma

Long-Term Results Encouraging for Combination Immunotherapy for Advanced Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The first long-term follow-up results from a phase 1b immunotherapy trial combining drugs for advanced melanoma patients has shown encouraging results—long-lasting with high survival rates—researchers report. First author Mario Sznol, M.D., professor of medical oncology at Yale Cancer Center, is presenting the updated data at the 2014 annual conference of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago.


"Sznol, clinical research leader of the melanoma research program at Yale Cancer Center, was the senior author on the original study of combination immunotherapy that was first published in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at ASCO in 2013. Jedd Wolchok, M.D., of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center was first author of the earlier study, and senior author of this updated research."


Editor's note: Immunotherapy treatments boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. This story describes a promising treatment that combines two immunotherapy drugs: nivolumab and ipilimumab (Yervoy).

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 2, 2014

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NeoStem Presents Data at ASCO Annual Meeting

"NeoStem, Inc., a leader in the emerging cellular therapy industry, today announced results of a pooled analysis indicating that Melapuldencel-T, an investigational patient-specific immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma, may increase survival rates significantly for patients at the most advanced stages of the disease. The findings will be presented on Sunday, June 1 in a poster by Robert O. Dillman, MD, study author and Vice-President, NeoStem Oncology, at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), taking place in Chicago."


Editor's note: This is a press release from a company that manufactures an immunotherapy treatment for melanoma. The treatment, called Melapuldencel-T, is meant to boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. A recent study testing Melapuldencel-T in patients found promising results for the treatment.

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NeoStem  |  May 29, 2014

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Old Cancer Drug Gets Fresh Look

Old Cancer Drug Gets Fresh Look | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"When Dave deBronkart was diagnosed with advanced kidney cancer in 2007, he learned about a treatment called high-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) that fires up the body’s immune system to fight the disease. The response rate was not great — tumours shrank in only about 15% of patients. And as many as 4% of people died from the treatment. But some of those who responded survived for years or even decades."


Editor's note: IL-2 is an immunotherapy drug, meaning that it boosts a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. It and other new immunotherapies are showing promise for patients across many different cancer types.

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Nature  |  May 27, 2014

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Nature  |  May 27, 2014

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Nature  |  May 27, 2014

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10 Issues to Consider During National Skin Cancer Awareness Month

10 Issues to Consider During National Skin Cancer Awareness Month | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Accounting for approximately half of all cancers in the United States, skin cancer is widely recognized as the most common cause of cancer nationwide. More than 3.5 million cases of skin cancer are diagnosed each year, and according to the Skin Cancer Foundation, incidences of skin cancer outnumber all combined cases of breast, colon, lung and prostate cancers.


"With the month of May designated as National Skin Cancer Awareness Month, HemOnc Today highlights 10 issues for oncologists and dermatologists to consider for their patients, as well as the new guideline revisions and research regarding the identification, treatment and management of patients with melanoma and skin cancer."

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Healio  |  May 15, 2014

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Future of Cancer Treatments

Future of Cancer Treatments | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The news spurred hundreds of phone calls and emails to Comprehensive Cancer Centers of Nevada from across the country: Two Stage 4 cancer patients at the Las Vegas center, after participating in the first human trial of an antibody drug with the unwieldy code name of MPDL 3280A, were now cancer-free.


"Rosemary Rathbun, 78, had been so far gone with throat cancer that doctors told her to enroll in hospice. Lorrine Rodgers, 56, had been told there were no other treatments for her spreading breast cancer.


"That their cancer disappeared, the women said in January, was a miracle."


Editor's note: This story is a great overview of an increasingly promising type of cancer treatment called immunotherapy. Immunotherapy treatments boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer.

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Las Vegas Review-Journal  |  Apr 26, 2014

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Las Vegas Review-Journal  |  Apr 26, 2014

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New Cancer Vaccine Approach Directly Targets Dendritic Cells

New Cancer Vaccine Approach Directly Targets Dendritic Cells | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Celldex Therapeutics announced today that final data from its Phase 1 study of CDX-1401 in solid tumors, including long-term patient follow-up, have been published inScience Translational Medicine. The data demonstrate robust antibody and T cell responses and evidence of clinical benefit in patients with very advanced cancers and suggest that CDX-1401 may predispose patients to better outcomes on subsequent therapy with checkpoint inhibitors. CDX-1401 is an off-the-shelf vaccine consisting of a fully human monoclonal antibody with specificity for the dendritic cell receptor DEC-205 linked to the NY-ESO-1 tumor antigen. The vaccine is designed to activate the patient's immune system against cancers that express the tumor marker NY-ESO-1. While the function of NY-ESO-1 continues to be explored, references in the literature suggest that its expression might reflect the acquisition of properties that cancers find useful, such as immortality, self-renewal, migratory ability and the capacity to invade."


Editor's note: Cancer vaccines like CDX-1401 are a type of immunotherapy, meaning that they boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. CDX-1401 is able to attack tumor cells because the tumor cells have a molecule called NY-ESO-1 that CDX-1401 recognizes. We recently published a story about another treatment that is meant for patients whose tumors have NY-ESO-1. To learn more about how patients can use molecular testing to see if particular treatments might work for them, click here.

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Medical Xpress  |  Apr 16, 2014

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PD-1 Antibody Demonstrated Encouraging Activity in Metastatic Melanoma

PD-1 Antibody Demonstrated Encouraging Activity in Metastatic Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Heavily pretreated patients with metastatic melanoma who received the humanized anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody pidilizumab demonstrated encouraging rates of 12-month OS, according to results of a phase 2 study presented at the ASCO Annual Meeting.


“ 'Activity was previously seen [with pidilizumab] in two lymphoma populations in phase 2 studies,' researcher Michael B. Atkins, MD, deputy director of Georgetown-Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center in Washington, and professor of oncology and medicine at Georgetown University School of Medicine, said during a presentation. 'Correlative studies in those lymphoma populations supported a PD-1/PD-L1–linked mechanism of action, and importantly there was no change or an increase in PD-1–positive CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes and CD14 monocytes following the drug, excludingantibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of PD-1–positive cells as a consequence of therapy.' "


Editor's note: Pidilizumab is a new drug that that might benefit people with metastatic melanoma who have already been heavily treated. A recent clinical trial testing it in volunteer patients found some promising results, but further studies will be needed to see how to use pidilizumab most effectively, in terms of dosage and combining it with other drugs. Pidilizumab is an "anti-PD-1" immunotherapy, meaning that it interacts with a protein called PD-1 to boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. Learn more about immunotherapy treatments for melanoma at our Need to Know blog.

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Healio  |  Jun 24, 2014

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Experimental Leukaemia Drug Boosts Immune Response Against Other Cancers

Experimental Leukaemia Drug Boosts Immune Response Against Other Cancers | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Experimental drugs being tested in clinical trials for leukaemia may also boost the body’s immune response against other forms of cancer, according to research from University College London (UCL).


"The drugs target an important protein called p110δ, produced in large amounts in white blood cells called ‘leukocytes’.


"Leukaemias can develop if leukocytes become cancerous, making p110δ a promising target for treating this form of cancer.


"And recent clinical trials using these drugs have shown encouraging results. But until now the potential benefit of these drugs for other types of cancer had remained unexplored.


"In the latest study, published in Nature, researchers working with mice bearing solid tumours found that the drugs - called p110δ inhibitors - helped boost their immune response against a range of tumour types – including breast cancer."


Editor's note: Scientists have tested new drugs in mice with a variety of tumor types, including breast cancer, and found that the drugs may help the mice fight off cancer. These drugs are already being used in humans in clinical trials for leukemia, so it might not be long before scientists try the drugs in volunteer patients with other types of cancer.

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Cancer Research UK  |  Jun 11, 2014

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Cancer Research UK  |  Jun 11, 2014

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Tumor Size is Defining Factor to Response from Promising Melanoma Drug

Tumor Size is Defining Factor to Response from Promising Melanoma Drug | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"In examining why some advanced melanoma patients respond so well to the experimental immunotherapy MK-3475, while others have a less robust response, researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida found that the size of tumors before treatment was the strongest variable.


"They say their findings, being presented June 2 at the 50th annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), offered several clinical insights that could lead to different treatment strategies and perhaps influence staging of advanced melanoma."


Editor's note: MK-3475 is a promising new immunotherapy drug that boosts a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. It works very well for some patients, and not so well for others. New research shows that doctors may be able to predict whether MK-3475 will work well or not based on the size of a patient's tumors before treatment. Patients who had a large total volume of tumors were less likely to respond well to the drug, no matter where in the body those tumors were found.

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 2, 2014

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Incyte : Announces Preliminary Results of a Phase I/II Study of Combination Immunotherapy in Patients with Melanoma

"Incyte Corporation (Nasdaq: INCY) today announced that preliminary results from an ongoing Phase I/II study of INCB24360, its oral indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) inhibitor, combined with ipilimumab in patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma were presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), May 30 to June 3, 2014, in Chicago. The poster reported initial findings showing that the combination was generally well tolerated and produced evidence of clinical response."

Editor's note: This article discusses a new treatment for melanoma that combines a drug called INCB24360 with the drug ipilimumab (Yervoy). Both drugs are immunotherapies, meaning they boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. A clinical trial testing the combo in volunteer patients found promising preliminary results.
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4-traders  |  Jun 2, 2014

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Amgen Presents New Data On Talimogene Laherparepvec As Single Agent And Combination Therapy In Metastatic Melanoma At ASCO

Amgen Presents New Data On Talimogene Laherparepvec As Single Agent And Combination Therapy In Metastatic Melanoma At ASCO | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Amgen today announced new data from two key clinical trials that support the potential of talimogene laherparepvec, a novel, investigational oncolytic immunotherapy, as both a single agent and as part of a combination regimen in patients with metastatic melanoma. The findings were presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago."


Editor's note: This article describes promising results for a melanoma treatment called talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC), an immunotherapy that boosts a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. Previous testing of the drug has found mixed results.

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MarketWatch  |  Jun 2, 2014

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MK3475 Induced High Rates of Durable Responses in Advanced Melanoma

MK3475 Induced High Rates of Durable Responses in Advanced Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A majority of patients with advanced melanoma who had and had not received previous ipilimumab demonstrated durable responses with the PD-1 targeted antibody MK-3475, according to study results presented at the ASCO Annual Meeting.


“ 'This is the largest phase 1 clinical trial ever conducted in this disease, and together with a lung cancer cohort, this is the largest phase 1 trial ever done in oncology,' study investigator Antoni Ribas, MD, PhD, professor of medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California in Los Angeles, said during a press conference. 'These are early data, but they tell us we are on to something really important.' ”


Editor's note: The cancer drug MK-3475 is an immunotherapy, meaning that it boosts a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. This story describes a clinical trial that tested MK-3475 on volunteer patients with advanced melanoma, and found good results for a majority of the patients. Some of the patients had previously been treated with the drug ipilimumab (Yervoy) and some had not; both kinds of patients benefited from MK-3475 in the trial.

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Healio  |  Jun 3, 2014

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New System for Treating Cancer Seen as Hopeful

New System for Treating Cancer Seen as Hopeful | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Drugs that unleash the body’s immune system to combat tumors could allow patients with advanced melanoma to live far longer than ever before, researchers gathered at the nation’s largest cancer conference say.


“ 'It’s a completely different world for patients with metastatic melanoma, to talk about the majority of patients being alive for years rather than weeks or months,' said Dr. Jedd D. Wolchok, a melanoma specialist at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, interviewed at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology here."


Editor's note: This is a good exploration of immunotherapy treatments for melanoma; immunotherapy for lung cancer is also discussed.

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The New York Times  |  Jun 2, 2014

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New Therapies Harness Power of the Immune System Against Cancer

New Therapies Harness Power of the Immune System Against Cancer | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"New research on innovative immunotherapies for advanced or high-risk melanoma and cervical cancer were presented today at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). These treatments – used alone or in combination – fight cancer by activating and amplifying the body's immune response to the disease.


"The new studies find high activity with investigative drugs for advanced melanoma, and show for the first time that ipilimumab, a treatment already approved for advanced melanoma, can substantially decrease the risk of melanoma recurrence in certain patients with earlier-stage disease. In addition, another small trial reports that a one-time, personalized immunotherapy treatment induces complete and long-lasting remissions in a small number of women with advanced cervical cancer – a disease with little to no effective treatment options."


Editor's note: Immunotherapies are treatments that boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. Learn more.

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Medical Xpress  |  Jun 2, 2014

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T-cell Changes: Why Only Some Respond to Ipilimumab

"The immunotherapy ipilimumab (Yervoy, Bristol-Myers Squibb Company) works amazingly well in some patients, hardly at all in others. A groundbreaking study that used deep sequencing techniques offers some clues as to why.


"Ipilimumab, which is marketed for melanoma but is being explored in several other cancer types, including prostate cancer, acts as a checkpoint blocker by inhibiting cytotoxic T lymphocyte– associated antigen–4 (CTLA-4).


"Immune repertoire sequencing has confirmed that blocking CTLA-4 increased turnover and diversity of the T-cell repertoire in some patients with advanced prostate cancer or metastatic melanoma, but also showed that patients who survived longest maintained clones of high-frequency T-cells they had developed before starting treatment."


Editor's note: Ipilimumab is a drug that boosts a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. It works by activating immune system cells called T cells, some subtypes of which may then attack tumors. Ipilimumab works very well for some patients, but not for others. This study found that patients who had certain tumor-fighting T cell subtypes already present before ipilimumab treatment were more likely to respond well and survive longer, possibly because these cells were readily available to fight cancer upon activation. The study also found that ipilimumab may prompt the immune system to "re-shuffle" the body's T cell subtypes, allowing patients with only a small amount of tumor-fighting T cells to generate more. (This may explain why some patients take longer to respond to ipilimumab than others; their immune systems need more time to build up the right T cells.) Based on the results, doctors may be able to monitor a patient's T cell subtypes ("immune repertoire sequencing") to determine whether ipilimumab will work, or to keep tabs on the effectiveness of ongoing ipilimumab treatment.

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Medscape  |  May 28, 2014

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Medscape  |  May 28, 2014

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FDA Grants Merck’s Anti-PD1 Antibody Priority Review

FDA Grants Merck’s Anti-PD1 Antibody Priority Review | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The FDA has granted Merck’s anti-PD1 antibody MK-3475 a priority review designation for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma in patients who have previously been treated with ipilimumab. Priority review status is reserved for drugs considered to offer a significant improvement in the safety or efficacy of the treatment of a serious condition. It will shorten the drug’s FDA review period from 10 months to 6 months."


Editor's note: MK-3475 is an immunotherapy drug that works by boosting a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. Once it is approved by the FDA for unresectable or metastatic melanoma, doctors in the U.S. will be able to prescribe it to their patients outside of the clinical trial system.

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Cancer Network  |  May 21, 2014

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Patient’s Cells Deployed to Attack Aggressive Cancer

Patient’s Cells Deployed to Attack Aggressive Cancer | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Doctors have taken an important step toward a long-sought goal: harnessing a person’s own immune system to fight cancer.


"An article published Thursday in the journal Science describes the treatment of a 43-year-old woman with an advanced and deadly type of cancer that had spread from her bile duct to her liver and lungs, despite chemotherapy.


"Researchers at the National Cancer Institute sequenced the genome of her cancer and identified cells from her immune system that attacked a specific mutation in the malignant cells. Then they grew those immune cells in the laboratory and infused billions of them back into her bloodstream.

"The tumors began 'melting away,' said Dr. Steven A. Rosenberg, the senior author of the article and chief of the surgery branch at the cancer institute."


Editor's note: This story is about an "immunotherapy" technique meant to boost a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. Learn more about immunotherapy here.

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New York Times  |  May 8, 2014

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New York Times  |  May 8, 2014

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Survival Hope for Melanoma Patients Thanks to New Vaccine

Survival Hope for Melanoma Patients Thanks to New Vaccine | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"University of Adelaide researchers have discovered that a new trial vaccine offers the most promising treatment to date for melanoma that has spread, with increased patient survival rates and improved ability to stop or reverse the cancer.


"The vaccine, known as vaccinia melanoma cell lysate (VMCL), was given regularly as a treatment to 54 South Australian patients with advanced, inoperable melanoma over a 10-year period."


Editor's note: The cancer vaccine VMCL is a type of immunotherapy, which means it boosts a patient's own immune system to fight cancer.

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Medical Xpress  |  Apr 17, 2014

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