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A Wide Variety of Cancers Imaged and Treated with New Tumor-Targeting Agent

"Scientists at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center (UWCCC) report that a new class of tumor-targeting agents can seek out and find dozens of solid tumors, even illuminating brain cancer stem cells that resist current treatments.


"What's more, years of animal studies and early human clinical trials show that this tumor-targeting, alkylphosphocholine (APC) molecule can deliver two types of 'payloads' directly to cancer cells: a radioactive or fluorescent imaging label, or a radioactive medicine that binds and kills cancer cells.


"The results are reported in today's issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine, and featured in the journal's cover illustration and podcast."


Editor's note: This story discusses a new method to make cancer cells visible to oncologists, and to deliver drugs directly to cells. The method uses a molecule called APC, which makes a beeline for cancer cells and can deliver imaging labels or radiotherapy treatments.

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Medical News Today  |  Jun 13, 2014

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 13, 2014 2:29 PM

Medical News Today  |  Jun 13, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 13, 2014 2:29 PM

Medical News Today  |  Jun 13, 2014

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New Dye Could Tag Melanomas That Aren't Dark

New Dye Could Tag Melanomas That Aren't Dark | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Surgeons may be able to see—and remove—skin cancers completely, thanks to a new compound that tags tumors. Called BLZ-100, the experimental compound combines a fluorescent dye with a protein fragment that binds cancer cells. A phase I clinical trial of intravenously injected BLZ-100 will soon be underway in Australia, enrolling up to 30 people with basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, or melanomas that lack the dark pigment melanin, making them hard to diagnose. In addition, U.S. clinical trials are expected for other kinds of tumors by the end of 2014.



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Blaze Bioscience, Inc.  |  Dec 17, 2013

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New FDA-Approved Dye Catches More Tumors That Have Spread

Surgeons may now have a better tool for tracking where tumors have spread, according to a phase III clinical trial that was reported in the Annals of Surgical Oncology. Tumors can spread into nearby (or sentinel) lymph nodes, and the new tool is a radioactive dye called tilmanocept that marks lymph nodes. The trial included 148 people with both melanoma and breast cancer. The researchers found that tilmanocept identified nearly 20% more tumor cells in sentinel lymph nodes than the standard blue dye (94% vs 76%). Tilmanocept, which is also called Lymphoseek, was approved by the FDA on March 13, 2013.


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Science Daily│Mar 20, 2013

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Cancer Doctors Have Opportunities to Cut Costs Without Risk to Patients, Experts Say

Cancer Doctors Have Opportunities to Cut Costs Without Risk to Patients, Experts Say | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"In a review article published Feb. 14 in The Lancet Oncology, Johns Hopkins experts identify three major sources of high cancer costs and argue that cancer doctors can likely reduce them without harm to patients. The cost-cutting proposals call for changes in routine clinical practice involved in end-of-life care, medical imaging and drug pricing.


" 'We need to find the best ways to manage costs effectively while maintaining the same, if not better, quality of life among our patients,' says Thomas Smith, M.D., The Harry J. Duffey Family Professor of Palliative Medicine and professor of oncology at Johns Hopkins."

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Medical Xpress  |  Feb 14, 2014

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Medical Xpress  |  Feb 14, 2014

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Medical Xpress  |  Feb 14, 2014

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T-Rays Could Reveal Nascent Melanomas

T-Rays Could Reveal Nascent Melanomas | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

The same imaging technology used at airport security checkpoints could also help us find melanomas that we can't see yet, according to research presented at the American Chemical Society's fall 2013 meeting. The technology uses terahertz rays (T-rays), which are the wavelengths between microwaves and the infrared rays that we feel as heat. In contrast to X-rays, T-rays are not ionizing and so are much safer, penetrating only a few millimeters into the skin. Melanomas start in the deepest part of the skin's outer layer, long before they appear on the surface as mole-like growths. Early results suggest that dermatologists could use T-rays to diagnose melanomas that are just beginning to form.

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 American Chemical Society│Sep 11, 2013

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