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ASCO Releases First Three Guidelines on Cancer Survivorship Care

"The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) today issued three evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on the prevention and management of symptoms that affect many cancer survivors—neuropathy, fatigue and depression, and anxiety. The guidelines are the first three in a planned series of guidelines on survivorship care. The recommendations reinforce the need to care for the both physical and psychological needs of cancer survivors."


"The release of these guidelines come at a time when the number of people with a history of cancer in the United States has increased dramatically, from 3 million in 1971 to about 13.7 million today. Despite these important gains, cancer survivors still face a range of long-term challenges from their disease and its treatment.  Cancer survivors face an increased risk for other health problems, premature mortality and side-effects from treatment.  The transition from active treatment to post-treatment care is critical to optimal long-term health. If care is not planned and coordinated, cancer survivors are left without knowledge of their heightened risks and a follow-up plan of action.


"In addition to the guidelines, Cancer.Net, ASCO’s patient information website, has updated information for survivors that is based on ASCO’s latest recommendations."

Cancer Commons's insight:

ASCO  |  Apr 14, 2014

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 16, 1:28 PM

ASCO  |  Apr 14, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 16, 1:28 PM

ASCO  |  Apr 14, 2014

Tambre Leighn's curator insight, April 17, 8:30 AM

Great.  More guidelines.  How much money is spent on research, writing, studies and more to get to the finding that there is a, "need to care for the both physical and psychological needs of cancer survivors."  At some point, information must be turned into action - and many recommendations in survivorship these days come with mandates but no resources to implement or processes by which to initiate.


Cancer survivorship needs more funding and more insurance coverage, not more recommendations  - most of which have already been well documented and published for over a decade.  

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No Convincing Evidence That Supplements Help Prevent Cancer

No Convincing Evidence That Supplements Help Prevent Cancer | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A review by a panel of independent U.S. experts concludes there is not enough evidence to recommend either for or against the use of most vitamin or mineral supplements to reduce the risk of cancer. However, the panel’s guidelines advise against the use of beta-carotene (a precursor of vitamin A) and vitamin E for cancer prevention, because there is relatively clear evidence that neither is effective. Indeed, beta-carotene supplements appear to increase lung cancer risk in people already at high risk of the disease. Instead, the panel recommends that healthy adults without nutritional deficiencies get their nutrients by eating a varied diet to minimize the risk of chronic disease, including cancer.

Cancer Commons's insight:

MedPage Today | Nov 11, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 13, 2013 1:12 AM

MedPage Today | Nov 11, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, November 13, 2013 4:34 PM

MedPage Today | Nov 11, 2013

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Open Letter Urges Administration to Provide Guidance to Protect Patient Access to Clinical Trials

Open Letter Urges Administration to Provide Guidance to Protect Patient Access to Clinical Trials | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Over 50 medical and advocacy organizations have jointly authored an open letter to the U.S. Administration calling for clear guidance to regulate the implementation of a statute protecting patient access to clinical trials. At present, only 6% of patients with severe chronic illness and fewer than 5% of cancer patients participate in clinical trials. This low participation rate hampers the progress of research necessary to develop much-needed new treatments. To promote and protect patient participation in clinical trials, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act ("Obamacare") contains a provision that mandates coverage of routine medical costs for people who participate in approved clinical trials. However, the details of implementing this provision are left up to the individual states, which may lead to uneven and unpredictable coverage. The letter points to a 2010 study showing that patients have been denied coverage of their clinical trial costs, even in states that already require such coverage. The letter signatories therefore call for federal guidelines for implementation to be issued before the provision goes into effect on January 1, 2014.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ASCO in Action | June 18, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 20, 2013 6:31 AM

ASCO in Action | Jun 18, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 20, 2013 11:51 AM

ASCO in Action | June 18, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 20, 2013 11:51 AM

ASCO in Action | June 18, 2013

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Radiation from Medical Imaging May Increase Cancer Rates

Radiation from Medical Imaging May Increase Cancer Rates | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Medical imaging techniques that use high doses of radiation, including CT scans, play an important role in modern medicine, including cancer screening. However, these procedures may themselves increase the incidence of cancer. Radiation exposure from medical imaging in the U.S. has increased more than sixfold between the 1980s and 2006. Several studies have linked multiple CT scans to increased cancer risk. Moreover, there are no official guidelines on the correct radiation doses for different medical imaging techniques, meaning that doses at one hospital may be up to 50 times higher than at another. Clear standards are needed to ensure that high-radiation imaging techniques are only used when clearly medically necessary and that the lowest feasible radiation doses are employed.

Cancer Commons's insight:

New York Times  |  Jan 30, 2014

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, February 3, 2:23 AM

New York Times  |  Jan 30, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, February 3, 11:27 AM

New York Times  |  Jan 30, 2014

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Thinner Melanomas May Warrant Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsies, Too

New research suggests that more people with melanomas should get sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsies. Current guidelines recommend these biopsies when melanomas are more than 1 millimeter (mm) thick. However, the researchers identified 1,250 people who had melanomas thinner than 1 mm, and who had undergone SLN biopsies, and found that cancer cells had spread to the lymph nodes in more than 6% of those with melanomas between 0.75 and 1.00 mm thick. Based on this finding, the researchers call for dropping the thickness threshold for SLN biopsies to 0.75 mm.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Journal of Clinical Oncology│Nov 4, 2013

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