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Most Cancer Survivors Not Exercising Enough to Benefit

Most Cancer Survivors Not Exercising Enough to Benefit | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Despite the benefits that physical activity can offer, a mere 10% of cancer survivors are exercising enough to reap those benefits, according to research conducted by Yale Cancer Center and the Yale School of Public Health. The findings will be presented beginning April 5, at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2014, in San Diego."

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 28, 2014

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, March 28, 2014 1:34 PM

Medical Xpress  |  Mar 28, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, March 28, 2014 1:34 PM

Medical Xpress  |  Mar 28, 2014

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Pretreatment Interventions May Optimize Outcomes for Cancer Patients

Pretreatment Interventions May Optimize Outcomes for Cancer Patients | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Interventions given between the time of initial cancer diagnosis and the start of acute cancer treatment – so-called “prehabilitation” – may improve health outcomes for cancer patients, a review of related studies argues. These interventions can include general physical conditioning, such as aerobic exercise to build strength; specific physical interventions, such as pelvic strengthening exercises before prostate cancer surgery or help quitting smoking before lung cancer treatment; and psychological support. In a number of studies, prehabilitation was shown to reduce treatment complication rates, lead to shorter hospital stays and/or fewer readmissions, improve mental health outcomes, lower health care costs, and make some patients eligible for additional treatment options.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical News Today | Jul 23, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 24, 2013 6:57 AM

Medical News Today | Jul 23, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 24, 2013 1:25 PM

Medical News Today | Jul 23, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 24, 2013 1:25 PM

Medical News Today | Jul 23, 2013

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Exercise Increases Quality of Life for People with Cancer

Exercise Increases Quality of Life for People with Cancer | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Cancer and its treatment can diminish quality of life, but two recent reviews of past clinical trials show that exercise can help restore a sense of well-being in both cancer patients and survivors. Measures of quality of life included fatigue, anxiety, and pain, while types of exercise included walking, bicycling, and yoga. The first review looked at 56 trials with a total of 4,826 people who were undergoing cancer treatment. This review showed, for example, that exercise reduced anxiety, fatigue, and sleep disturbances and that the more intense the exercise, the greater the benefits. The second review examined 40 trials with a total of 3,500 people who had completed cancer treatment. This review showed, for example, that people who exercised were less worried and felt less fatigue and pain. They also had better self images, which is key to avoiding the social isolation that can come with changes in appearance due to cancer treatments.

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Medical Xpress│Apr 5, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 8, 2013 12:50 PM

Medical Xpress│Apr 5, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 8, 2013 12:50 PM

Medical Xpress│Apr 5, 2013

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Internet Use Linked to Cancer-Preventive Behaviors in Older Adults

Internet Use Linked to Cancer-Preventive Behaviors in Older Adults | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A UK survey found that older individuals who use the Internet are more likely to engage in cancer-preventive behaviors. Adults aged 50 years and older who were regular Internet users were 50% more likely to get screened for colorectal cancer than non-users. They were also more physically active, smoked less, and ate more fruits and vegetables. Younger, wealthier, and more educated respondents were more likely to use the Internet, and fewer women and non-white survey participants used the Internet. However, the link between Internet use and cancer-preventive behaviors remained even after controlling for these factors. Given the apparent beneficial influence of Internet use on cancer outcomes, the survey’s authors urge policymakers to promote better Internet access for currently underserved demographics.

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ScienceDaily | Oct 22, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, October 23, 2013 11:37 PM

ScienceDaily | Oct 22, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, October 30, 2013 3:59 PM

ScienceDaily | Oct 22, 2013

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Cancer Patients Need Support to Adopt Healthy Lifestyles

Cancer Patients Need Support to Adopt Healthy Lifestyles | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Healthy lifestyles can benefit people with cancer, reducing recurrence and increasing long-term survival. But that knowledge alone is not enough to make cancer patients start exercising, and stop smoking and drinking, researchers report in the British Journal of Cancer. The study included 5,146 adults from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, and showed that the 433 who got cancer did not adopt healthier habits after diagnosis. Instead, they smoked and drank as much as those without cancer, and exercised even less. The researchers call for figuring out how to help cancer patients make lifestyle changes that can protect their health.

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British Journal of Cancer│May 22, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 23, 2013 2:05 PM

British Journal of Cancer│May 22, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 23, 2013 2:05 PM

British Journal of Cancer│May 22, 2013