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Myriad Genetics, Inc. - Myriad myPath(TM) Melanoma Test Improves the Reliability of Melanoma Diagnosis

"Myriad Genetics, Inc. (Nasdaq:MYGN) today presented results from a pivotal clinical validation study of the Myriad myPath™ Melanoma test at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Chicago, Ill. The Myriad myPath Melanoma test is a novel molecular test that accurately differentiates malignant melanoma from benign skin lesions with a high level of accuracy and helps physicians deliver a more objective and confident diagnosis for patients."

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Myriad  |  Jun 2, 2014

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Blue Nevi Acquired in Older Men, Lacked Association with Melanoma

Blue Nevi Acquired in Older Men, Lacked Association with Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Blue nevi commonly occurred in older men and usually were not associated with melanoma, according to recent study results.


" 'Our findings support the concept that benign [blue nevi] are not uncommonly acquired in older age individuals and that they may be safely clinically followed in the absence of concerning clinical and/or dermoscopic features,' the researchers said."

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Healio  |  May 7, 2014

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Skin Cancer Rates Five Times Higher Than in 70s

Skin Cancer Rates Five Times Higher Than in 70s | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The rates of people diagnosed with malignant melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer, are now five times higher than 40 years ago, according to figures announced by Cancer Research UK.


"More than 13,000 people are now developing the disease every year compared with around 1,800 in 1975.


"The latest incidence rates show around 17 people in every 100,000 are diagnosed with malignant melanoma in Great Britain every year. This is compared to just over 3 per 100,000 in the mid 70s."

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Medical Xpress  |  Apr 23, 2014

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Sidestepping the Biopsy With New Tools to Spot Cancer

Sidestepping the Biopsy With New Tools to Spot Cancer | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"For people with cancer or suspected cancer, the biopsy is a necessary evil — an uncomfortable and somewhat risky procedure to extract tissue for diagnosis or analysis.


"Lynn Lewis, a breast cancer patient in Brooklyn, has had her cancer analyzed an easier way: simple blood tests that are being called 'liquid biopsies.'


"Telltale traces of a tumor are often present in the blood. These traces — either intact cancer cells or fragments of tumor DNA — are present in minuscule amounts, but numerous companies are now coming to market with sophisticated tests that can detect and analyze them."

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The New York Times  |  Apr 7, 2014

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The New York Times  |  Apr 7, 2014

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The New York Times  |  Apr 7, 2014

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New Cancer Family History Guidance From ASCO

New Cancer Family History Guidance From ASCO | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A new set of recommendations are now available for oncologists on how to collect and utilize the cancer family history of a recently diagnosed cancer patient. The recommendations were released by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and are published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. This is the first guidance specifically on how oncologists can use family history information to assess whether the patient may have a hereditary form of cancer and to identify those who may have a hereditary predisposition to cancer. The guidelines also review how to refer those patients to appropriate genetic testing and counseling."

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Cancer Network  |  Mar 13, 2014

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Cancer Network  |  Mar 13, 2014

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DNA Shed by Tumors Shows Promise for Non-Invasive Screening and Prognosis

DNA Shed by Tumors Shows Promise for Non-Invasive Screening and Prognosis | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Certain fragments of DNA shed by tumors into the bloodstream can potentially be used to non-invasively screen for early-stage cancers, monitor responses to treatment and help explain why some cancers are resistant to therapies, according to results of an international study led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators.


"Analyzing blood samples from 640 patients with various cancers, the researchers used digital polymerase chain reaction-based technology (a sophisticated method of multiplying and measuring the number DNA molecules) to evaluate how well the DNA fragments predicted the presence of tumors in the patients."

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 6, 2014

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Cancer Patients Diagnosed More Quickly

Cancer Patients Diagnosed More Quickly | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The time taken to diagnose some of the more common cancers – from the point when a patient first reports a possible symptom to their general practitioner (GP) – fell in adults by an average of five days in just under a decade, according to research published in the British Journal of Cancer."


Editor's Note: In the study, time from first symptoms to cancer diagnosis fell from an average of 125 to 120 days in 7 years, for adults in the UK.

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Cancer Research UK  |  Feb 5, 2014

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Cancer Research UK  |  Feb 5, 2014

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Cancer Research UK  |  Feb 5, 2014

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New Dye Could Tag Melanomas That Aren't Dark

New Dye Could Tag Melanomas That Aren't Dark | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Surgeons may be able to see—and remove—skin cancers completely, thanks to a new compound that tags tumors. Called BLZ-100, the experimental compound combines a fluorescent dye with a protein fragment that binds cancer cells. A phase I clinical trial of intravenously injected BLZ-100 will soon be underway in Australia, enrolling up to 30 people with basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, or melanomas that lack the dark pigment melanin, making them hard to diagnose. In addition, U.S. clinical trials are expected for other kinds of tumors by the end of 2014.



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Blaze Bioscience, Inc.  |  Dec 17, 2013

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Computer Program Helps Doctors Determine When It’s Time to Test Patients for Cancer

Computer Program Helps Doctors Determine When It’s Time to Test Patients for Cancer | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new computer program may soon help doctors decide whether patients should get tested for cancer based on their symptoms. The software is not meant to replace the physician’s judgment, but rather supplement it, developers say. Many general practitioners do not have specific cancer expertise, or the time to calculate each patient’s cancer risk in detail–a task made instantaneous by the computer program. The software also analyzes each symptom in the context of all other relevant information in a patient’s record–age, sex, smoking status, family history–along with any other symptoms reported during earlier visits. Ensuring timely testing for patients at risk of cancer is a critical step towards early treatment with a higher chance of success.

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Cancer Research UK | Nov 5, 2013

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Three Metastasis Myths, Debunked

Three Metastasis Myths, Debunked | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Persistent rumors claim that a needle biopsy – a procedure in which a surgeon removes a small part of a suspected tumor using a needle – can cause cancer to spread. However, there is no evidence that this is the case. On the contrary, biopsies often allow early diagnosis and timely treatment of cancers. Likewise, there is no evidence that massage promotes cancer spread. Indeed, massage therapy for cancer patients can reduce pain, muscle tension, mental stress, and nausea. Cancer spread is driven by biological changes inside the cancer cells, not outside mechanical forces like a biopsy needle or a massage. Finally, sugar does not “feed” cancer. Excess sugar consumption can contribute to obesity, which is associated with increased risk of several cancers, but by itself, sugar does not have any effect on cancer spread.

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ScienceDaily | Oct 25, 2013

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New UK Smartphone App May Help ID Melanomas

New UK Smartphone App May Help ID Melanomas | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new smartphone app for identifying likely melanomas is now available in the UK. Called Mole Detect Pro, the app is based on a beta version called Mole Detective that has been available in the U.S. for 2 years. The new app analyzes uploaded pictures of moles and gauges the chances that they are melanomas using the ABCDE method that is recommended for self checks at home:

  • Asymmetry—irregular shape
  • Border—ragged, notched, or blurred
  • Color—more than one in an individual mole
  • Diameter—bigger than 6 mm
  • Evolution—changing size, color, or shape


However, while apps can help detect melanomas, recent research in JAMA Dermatology shows that that they can also miss them. Doctors caution that people should not rely on apps for diagnosing melanomas.

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Medical News Today│Mar 22, 2013

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Melanoma Apps No Substitute for Doctors

A JAMA Dermatology study shows the dangers of using smartphone apps to self-diagnose melanomas. The researchers compared diagnoses of 60 melanomas and 128 benign lesions by a board-certified dermatopathologist to those of four apps. Three of the apps incorrectly said that 30% or more of the melanomas were harmless. The fourth app, which sent images to board-certified dermatologists, was better, but still misdiagnosed one of the melanomas as benign. These apps are not subject to regulatory oversight.

 

Primary source: http://archderm.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1557488#qundefined

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Eurekalert | Jan 16, 2013

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Melanoma Detection Enhanced with Blood Biomarkers

Melanoma Detection Enhanced with Blood Biomarkers | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The need for invasive skin biopsies could be reduced extensively with Edith Cowan University researchers working on ways to detect melanoma in early stages, using a blood test in conjunction with visual scans.


"A $450,000 National Health and Medical Research Council development grant has enabled them to expand on a 2012 preliminary investigation of 40 people that identified eight blood biomarkers that indicated the early presence of melanoma tumour.


"ECU School of Medical Sciences Professor Mel Ziman conducted the original investigation and is working with PhD student Pauline Zaenker and postdoctoral research fellow Dr Elin Gray on the latest study."

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Medical Xpress  |  May 13, 2014

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iPhone App Offers Quick and Inexpensive Melanoma Screening

iPhone App Offers Quick and Inexpensive Melanoma Screening | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The idea sounds simple: Take a photo of a suspicious mole or lesion with your phone, run it through an embedded software program and find out within a few seconds if it is likely to be cancerous.


"But it could make quick and inexpensive screening a reality for millions of people who lack access to medical specialists. A University of Houston professor created the app, called DermoScan, which is now being evaluated for further testing at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. George Zouridakis, professor of engineering technology, has worked on the project since 2005, moving it to an application for a mobile phone after the iPhone became ubiquitous. The goal is to provide quick screening in rural areas or in the developing world, where specialty medical care generally isn't available, he said."

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Medical Xpress  |  May 7, 2014

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Mobile Technologies Expected to Change Paradigm in Melanoma Detection

Mobile Technologies Expected to Change Paradigm in Melanoma Detection | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"In this video, Allan C. Halpern, MD, illustrates how mobile technologies are expected to play a larger role in melanoma detection due to increased access and ease of use. However, he notes that a lack of oversight and quality assurance remain formidable challenges.


"While more than 50 iPhone apps are available to evaluate images of lesions, rashes and other abnormalities to help diagnose melanoma, the apps nevertheless use preexisting iPhone on-camera processing. Many inherent camera features attempt to improve the asthetic appearance of the skin, removing features that are critical to diagnosing a skin lesion."

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Healio  |  Apr 12, 2014

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Quick, Simple Blood Test for Solid Cancers Looks Feasible

Quick, Simple Blood Test for Solid Cancers Looks Feasible | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The idea of a general, quick and simple blood test for a diverse range of cancers just came closer to reality with news of a new study published in Nature Medicine.


"Researchers from Stanford University School of Medicine have devised an ultra-sensitive method for finding DNA from cancertumors in the bloodstream.


"Previous research has already shown circulating tumor DNA holds promise as a biomarker for cancer, but existing methods for detecting it are not sufficiently sensitive and do not cover a diverse range of cancers.


"Ways to increase the sensitivity and coverage of such tests exist, but these are cumbersome and time-consuming, and need lots of steps to customize for individual patients, so they are not feasible for use in clinics.


"The new approach promises to change that. It is highly sensitive and specific and should be broadly applicable to a range of cancers, say the researchers."

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Medical News Today  |  Apr 7, 2014

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Young Skin Cancer Survivors at Risk of Other Cancers Later

Young Skin Cancer Survivors at Risk of Other Cancers Later | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Young people who have been diagnosed with non-melanoma skin cancer related to sun exposure, under the age of 25, face a higher risk of developing melanoma and other cancers later in life, a study has shown. The researchers found that those who had NMSC under 25 years of age were 53 times more likely to get bone cancer, 26 times more likely to get blood cancers, 20 times more likely to get brain cancer, and 14 times more likely to get any cancer excluding those of the skin."

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ScienceDaily  |  Mar 10, 2014

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Hyperspectral Camera Shows Promising Results in Detection of Skin Cancer

Hyperspectral Camera Shows Promising Results in Detection of Skin Cancer | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"A lightweight, handheld, ultra-precision hyperspectral camera has been developed for the detection of skin cancers and their precursors. From the surface of the skin, the camera recognizes early stages of cancer that are invisible to the naked eye. The hand-held, mobile hyperspectral camera images the skin region in two seconds. The large field of view (12 cm2) enables the detection of large skin areas at once. The preliminary results are promising."

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ScienceDaily  |  Feb 27, 2014

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Dramatic Rise in Skin Cancer Among Middle-Aged Adults, Study Shows

"A new Mayo Clinic study found that among middle-aged men and women, 40 to 60 years old, the overall incidence of skin cancer increased nearly eightfold between 1970 and 2009, according to a study published in the January issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.


'" The most striking finding was among women in that age group,' says dermatologist Jerry Brewer, M.D., principal investigator of the study. 'Women between 40 and 50 showed the highest rates of increase we've seen in any group so far.'


"There has been widespread concern in recent years about the rising incidence of melanoma, which affects 75,000 Americans annually and results in nearly 9,000 deaths. Few studies, however, have investigated which age brackets of adults are most at risk."

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ScienceDaily  |  Feb 4, 2014

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Crowdsourcing Melanoma Identification

Crowdsourcing Melanoma Identification | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

People aren't very good at catching melanomas on their own, but a new study suggests that many heads are better than one when it comes to spotting these skin cancers. The researchers taught 500 people how to identify melanomas, then tested their accuracy on 40 images of moles, 9 of which were melanomas. As expected, each person was right only 58% of the time—but collectively, the group was right 90% of the time. Next, the team is developing a cell phone app to let people upload photos of worrisome moles for evaluation by others. The researchers caution, however, that such mole crowdsourcing would not replace clinical diagnosis. Rather, the app would steer high-risk people to get clinical skin examinations.

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Cancer Epidemiology │Dec 2013

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New Way to Find and Kill Cancer Cells

New Way to Find and Kill Cancer Cells | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A tiny new particle could pack a powerful anticancer punch, promising to speed diagnosis and pinpoint drug delivery. Conventional nanoparticles can only carry cancer-fighting materials on their surfaces, limiting their effectiveness. In contrast, the new 'Janus' nanoparticle has a porous interior that lets it carry cancer tests and treatments at the same time. Other uses for the new particle include delivering fluorescent dyes to illuminate cancer cells, making them easier for surgeons to find. This technological advance was presented at the 2013 Materials Science & Technology Conference in Canada.

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Science Daily│Oct 28, 2013

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Science Daily│Oct 28, 2013

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Laboratory-Developed Tests Need to Be Better Regulated

Diagnostic medical tests, including those used to detect cancers, usually have to be examined by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for safety and accuracy before getting approved. However, tests created by clinical laboratories (so-called laboratory-developed tests or LDTs) are exempt from this requirement. Such tests were originally intended for internal and research use only. However, with the rise of commercial laboratory testing companies, LDTs are reaching the general patient population. Because these tests have not been proven to deliver accurate and meaningful results, they could potentially mislead and harm patients. The FDA has drawn up a draft guidance document outlining better regulation for LDTs, but it is currently stalled in committee.

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New York Times | Jul 7, 2013

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New York Times | Jul 7, 2013

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New York Times | Jul 7, 2013

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Skin Checks Lower Risk that Melanomas Will Spread

Annual professional skin exams are the best way to avoid invasive melanomas, according to research presented at the American Academy of Dermatology meeting. The researchers analyzed data from 387 people who had just been diagnosed with melanoma. The cancer had not spread in 64% of those who had undergone skin checks in the past year, compared to 46% of those who had not. Moreover, the former group had thinner tumors (about 0.48 versus about 0.60 mm), which decreases the risk that they will spread. Only 38% of the people in the study had undergone skin checks in the year before diagnosis.


Research article: http://www.jaad.org/article/S0190-9622(12)01920-2/fulltext

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MedPage Today│ Mar 7, 2013

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