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Enlisting a Computer to Battle Cancers, One by One

Enlisting a Computer to Battle Cancers, One by One | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Once you decode a tumor’s genome, what’s next? Oncologists hope that IBM’s Watson will help them find drugs for patients’ particular brain cancer mix...


"When Robert B. Darnell was a graduate student in the early 1980s, he spent a year sequencing a tiny fragment of DNA. Now Dr. Darnell is an oncologist and the president of the New York Genome Center, where the DNA-sequencing machines can decode his grad-school fragment in less than a ten-thousandth of a second."

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The New York Times  |  Mar 27, 2014

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, March 28, 2014 4:08 PM

The New York Times  |  Mar 27, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, March 28, 2014 4:09 PM

The New York Times  |  Mar 27, 2014

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Double Targeted Therapy Approach Could be Key to Curing Nearly All Cancers

Double Targeted Therapy Approach Could be Key to Curing Nearly All Cancers | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Mathematical data gathered at Harvard suggests that using two targeted therapy drugs in a combination therapy could be an effective means of curing almost all types of cancer. The researchers pointed out that monotherapy treatments, in which just one drug is prescribed, work for a while but then begin to fail as the genetic mutations causing the cancer allow it to develop resistance to the drug. They argue that simultaneously prescribing two targeted therapy drugs could cure the cancer before it has a chance to develop resistance, if there is not a time overlap at all between the drugs (a single point mutation in a gene could derail both drugs). This double targeted therapy approach flies in the face of the conventional approach used by oncologists, who prefer to prescribe drugs one at a time.

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Science Daily | Jul 19, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 19, 2013 3:42 PM

Science Daily | Jul 19, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 19, 2013 6:14 PM

Science Daily | Jul 19, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 19, 2013 6:16 PM

Science Daily | Jul 19, 2013

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Timing of Radiotherapy Could Reduce Hair Loss

Timing of Radiotherapy Could Reduce Hair Loss | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new study suggests that mouse hair operates on a schedule–it grows quickly during the day and slows down at night to repair DNA damage. If human hair behaves similarly, the discovery could help cancer patients avoid an unpleasant side effect of chemotherapy: hair loss. The study found that mice lost 85% of their hair after morning radiation sessions, but just 17% following nighttime sessions; hair cells repaired the inflicted damage overnight. Cancer cells, however, replicate at the same speed regardless of time, so the time of treatment won’t alter its effectiveness. The researchers believe investigating circadian clocks in humans could lead to treatment programs that minimize collateral damage such as hair loss.

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Medical News Today | May 23, 2013

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Medical News Today | May 23, 2013

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Medical News Today | May 23, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 23, 2013 6:58 PM

Medical News Today | May 23, 2013

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Eating Organic Food Doesn't Lower Your Overall Risk of Cancer, Study Says

Eating Organic Food Doesn't Lower Your Overall Risk of Cancer, Study Says | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Women who always or mostly eat organic foods have the same likelihood of developing cancer as women who eat conventionally produced foods, according to an Oxford University study.


"Kathryn Bradbury and colleagues in Oxford's Cancer Epidemiology Unit found no evidence that regularly eating a diet that was grown free from pesticides reduced a woman's overall risk of cancer."

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 28, 2014

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 28, 2014

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Medical Xpress  |  Mar 28, 2014

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'iKnife' Could Revolutionize Cancer Surgery

'iKnife' Could Revolutionize Cancer Surgery | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A new surgical tool–dubbed the 'iKnife'–has the potential to change the way surgeons operate on cancer patients. Typically, surgeons use knives that vaporize tumors during procedures, which produces a strong-smelling smoke. Under standard protocol the surgeon must send tissue to the lab to be analyzed to determine whether or not it is cancerous, waiting on the results while the patient lies on the operating table for close to 30 minutes. The 'iKnife' eliminates the lab work, analyzing the smoke on its own to distinguish cancerous tissue from healthy tissue; it can tell doctors if the tissue is cancerous almost instantaneously. In a recent study, the knife correctly detected cancer in all 91 patients. Researchers believe the knife will lower tumor recurrence rates and enable more accurate procedures.

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CBS News | Jul 17, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 19, 2013 2:14 PM

CBS News | Jul 17, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 19, 2013 6:06 PM

CBS News | Jul 17, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, July 19, 2013 6:06 PM

CBS News | Jul 17, 2013