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NICE Proposes Ipilimumab as a First Treatment for Advanced Skin Cancer

NICE Proposes Ipilimumab as a First Treatment for Advanced Skin Cancer | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"People with advanced skin cancer should be able to receive ipilimumab as a first treatment, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) proposes.


"In final draft guidance, NICE recommends that the drug ipilimumab (also called Yervoy and manufactured by Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceuticals Limited) is made available on the NHS as a first-line treatment for patients with advanced malignant melanoma which is either unresectable (when the full tumour cannot be removed) or metastatic (the cancer has spread to other parts of the body).


"Sir Andrew Dillon, NICE chief executive, said: 'We already recommend ipilimumab as a second-line treatment and so we are pleased to be able to propose extending that recommendation to first line treatment too.' "


Editor's note: The UK's public healthcare system is required to provide funding for treatments recommended by NICE. To learn more about targeted melanoma drugs like ipilimumab, read The Basics.

Cancer Commons's insight:

NICE  |  Jun 12, 2014

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‘Early Access’ Scheme Unveiled for Innovative Medicines

‘Early Access’ Scheme Unveiled for Innovative Medicines | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"People with advanced cancer and other serious illnesses like dementia could soon benefit from early access to innovative and promising treatments.

"The Early Access to Medicines scheme would enable safe and promising drugs to be 'fast tracked' into the NHS before they have even been granted a licence for use.

"The new scheme will allow patients without other treatment options to be given experimental drugs that have not yet been licensed but that have been deemed safe and effective through clinical trials.

"Experts will carry out a rapid analysis of the treatment before labelling it a 'promising innovative medicine'.

"The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) will then offer a scientific opinion based on a medicine’s risks and benefits. If the benefits are found to outweigh the risks, doctors will be given the green light to offer the drug to patients."


Editor's Note: This UK program is similar to a program already in place in the US that allows patients to request access to drugs still being tested in clinical trials. Even though so-called "compassionate access" is possible, the process can be quite difficult for patients. Learn more about it  from our blog feature on the topic.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Cancer Research UK  |  Mar 14, 2014

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, March 14, 2014 5:10 PM

Cancer Research UK  |  Mar 14, 2014

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Cancer Research UK  |  Mar 14, 2014

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Skin Cancer Rates Five Times Higher Than in 70s

Skin Cancer Rates Five Times Higher Than in 70s | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The rates of people diagnosed with malignant melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer, are now five times higher than 40 years ago, according to figures announced by Cancer Research UK.


"More than 13,000 people are now developing the disease every year compared with around 1,800 in 1975.


"The latest incidence rates show around 17 people in every 100,000 are diagnosed with malignant melanoma in Great Britain every year. This is compared to just over 3 per 100,000 in the mid 70s."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical Xpress  |  Apr 23, 2014

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Cancer Patients Diagnosed More Quickly

Cancer Patients Diagnosed More Quickly | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"The time taken to diagnose some of the more common cancers – from the point when a patient first reports a possible symptom to their general practitioner (GP) – fell in adults by an average of five days in just under a decade, according to research published in the British Journal of Cancer."


Editor's Note: In the study, time from first symptoms to cancer diagnosis fell from an average of 125 to 120 days in 7 years, for adults in the UK.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Cancer Research UK  |  Feb 5, 2014

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Cancer Research UK  |  Feb 5, 2014

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Cancer Research UK  |  Feb 5, 2014