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A Catalog of Cancer Genes That’s Done, or Just a Start

A Catalog of Cancer Genes That’s Done, or Just a Start | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Cancer is a disease of genes gone wrong. When certain genes mutate, they make cells behave in odd ways. The cells divide swiftly, they hide from the immune system that could kill them and they gain the nourishment they need to develop into tumors.

"Scientists started identifying these cancer genes in the 1970s and their list slowly grew over the years. By studying them, scientists came to understand how different types of cancer develop and in some cases they were even able to develop gene-targeting drugs. Last May, for example, the Food and Drug Administration approved a drug known as Tarceva to treat lung cancer in which a gene called EGFR has mutated."

Cancer Commons's insight:

The New York Times  |  Feb 6, 2014

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, February 7, 2014 1:51 PM

The New York Times  |  Feb 6, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, February 7, 2014 1:51 PM

The New York Times  |  Feb 6, 2014

Rescooped by Cancer Commons from Lung Cancer Dispatch
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Clinical Trial Reveals Patients' Willingness to Undergo Genetic Testing for Personalized Cancer Treatment

Clinical Trial Reveals Patients' Willingness to Undergo Genetic Testing for Personalized Cancer Treatment | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A recently completed clinical trial examining the use of genetic testing to direct cancer treatment was able to exceed its enrollment goal of 600 participants in less than 2 years instead of the expected 5 years. Patients were willing to participate even though they had to undergo an additional biopsy, revealing considerable interest in personalized treatment based on genetic tests. The trial confirmed that erlotinib (Tarceva) is highly effective in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with a mutation in the EGFR gene. It also found that NSCLC patients with mutations in the KRAS gene did not benefit from the novel cancer drug selumetinib. In contrast, not enough small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients had any of the investigated mutations to properly test how they responded to treatments. Such mutations will require trials involving thousands of patients to draw reliable conclusions.

Cancer Commons's insight:

ScienceDaily | May 15, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 17, 2013 3:53 AM

ScienceDaily | May 15, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 17, 2013 1:14 PM

ScienceDaily | May 15, 2013