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Two Array-Invented MEK Inhibitors Showcased At ASCO

"Two Array BioPharma-invented MEK inhibitors, binimetinib (MEK162) and selumetinib, were showcased at the 50th annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).  At the meeting, preliminary data for the combination of binimetinib and CDK4/6 inhibitor LEE011 (discovered by Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research in collaboration with Astex Pharmaceuticals) from a Phase 1b/2 dose-escalation study conducted by Novartis in NRAS-mutant melanoma indicates the combination demonstrated an acceptable safety profile for most patients with promising preliminary antitumor activity.  Additionally, preliminary data for selumetinib showed favorable clinical activity in pediatric patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and plexiform neurofibromas (PNs)."


Editor's note: This article discusses a melanoma treatment that combines two durgs: binimetinib (aka MEK162) and selumetinib. A clinical trial recently found that the combo shows promise for melanoma patients whose tumors have mutations in the NRAS gene, as detected by molecular testing. Binimetinib is also being tested as a potential treatment for patients whose tumors have mutations in the BRAF gene.

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Array BioPharma  |  Jun 2, 2014

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New Treatments for Advanced Melanoma Presented at AAD

New Treatments for Advanced Melanoma Presented at AAD | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"In recent years, the FDA has approved new drugs for the treatment of advanced melanoma, which has presented new ways to treat the disease, according to a presentation at the American Academy of Dermatology annual meeting.


“ 'In the last four years there have been four new drugs that have been FDA-approved for melanoma and what’s even more exciting is that they really speak to two new ways to treating melanoma,' Allan C. Halpern, MD, MSc, chief of dermatology service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, told Healio.com.


"The most recent FDA approval, in January, was the combination of a BRAF inhibitor and a MEK inhibitor for treating advanced melanoma."

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Healio  |  Mar 23, 2014

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New Combination Treatment May Target Melanomas with BRAF Mutations Safely

New Combination Treatment May Target Melanomas with BRAF Mutations Safely | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

While melanomas with BRAF mutations can be targeted with a combination of BRAF inhibitors and MEK inhibitors, the treatment can have side effects such as fever, light sensitivity, and rashes. But early results of a phase I clinical trial suggest that BRAF-mutant melanomas could be treated safely and effectively with a new combination: LGX818, a BRAF inhibitor developed by Novartis and MEK162, a MEK inhibitor developed by Array BioPharma. Moreover, using these drugs together may decrease common side effects of targeted BRAF treatments, including skin toxicities and muscle and joint pain. A phase III trial of this new combination treatment is expected to begin later in 2013.

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Array Biopharma│Jun 3, 2013

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Trametinib Outperforms Chemotherapy for Melanomas with BRAF Mutations

A New England Journal of Medicine study reports a promising new approach to treating melanomas with BRAF mutations, which often respond to BRAF inhibitors for just a short time. Melanoma patients treated with trametinib were stable (i.e., did not get worse) for three times longer than those treated with dacarbazine, a conventional chemotherapy drug (4.8 vs. 1.5 months, respectively). Trametinib inhibits MEK, a protein that is activated by BRAF and is involved in cell division. The drug’s most common side effects were rash, diarrhea, and swelling in the legs, which could be controlled by periodically adjusting the dose.

 

Primary source: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1203421

Cancer Commons's insight:

MedPage Today | Jun 4, 2012

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Shaminder Singh's curator insight, July 26, 2013 4:56 AM

Academic Journal (Other type)

Shaminder Singh's comment, July 26, 2013 5:39 AM
This is a good news for those with skin cancer. This drug can inhibit the process for longer period of time than the conventional drug.
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Conference Abstract - MAP Kinase Pathway Alterations in BRAF-Mutant Melanoma Patients With Acquired Resistance to Combined RAF/MEK Inhibition

Conference Abstract - MAP Kinase Pathway Alterations in BRAF-Mutant Melanoma Patients With Acquired Resistance to Combined RAF/MEK Inhibition | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Treatment of BRAF-mutant melanoma with combined dabrafenib and trametinib, which target RAF and the downstream MAP–ERK kinase (MEK)1 and MEK2 kinases, respectively, improves progression-free survival and response rates compared with dabrafenib monotherapy. Mechanisms of clinical resistance to combined RAF/MEK inhibition are unknown. This study represents an initial clinical genomic study of acquired resistance to combined RAF/MEK inhibition in BRAF-mutant melanoma, using WES and RNA-seq. The presence of diverse resistance mechanisms suggests that serial biopsies and genomic/molecular profiling at the time of resistance may ultimately improve the care of patients with resistant BRAF-mutant melanoma by specifying tailored targeted combinations to overcome specific resistance mechanisms."


Editor's note: We previously covered the benefits of a dabrafenib/trametinib combo for advanced-stage melanoma. However, some patients' tumors become resistant to this drug combination and new treatment routes need to be considered. This study is exploring how molecular testing of specific genetic mutations in patients' tumors might be used to help guide treatment decisions after they become resistant to the dabrafenib/trametinib combo.

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MDLinx  |  Apr 8, 2014

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Immunotherapy, BRAF Inhibitor Sequence Affected Outcomes in Metastatic Melanoma

Immunotherapy, BRAF Inhibitor Sequence Affected Outcomes in Metastatic Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Prior treatment with immunotherapy did not limit response to BRAF inhibitors among patients with metastatic melanoma, according to results of a retrospective study.


"However, patients who underwent initial treatment with BRAF inhibitors and subsequently received immunotherapy with ipilimumab (Yervoy, Bristol-Myers Squibb) demonstrated poorer outcomes, results showed.


"Patients with BRAF-positive metastatic melanoma have several treatment options, including BRAF inhibitors vemurafenib (Zelboraf, Hoffmann-La Roche) and dabrafenib  (Taflinar, GlaxoSmithKline), the MEK inhibitor trametinib (Mekinist, GlaxoSmithKline), and the immunotherapy agents ipilimumab and interleukin-2. Yet, there are limited data with regard to optimal sequencing, according to researchers."

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Healio  |  Mar 14, 2014

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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, March 15, 2014 4:19 AM

Prior treatment with BRAF inhibitors reduced subsequent response to immunotherapy. Prior treatment with ipilimumab had no effect on response to BRAF inhibitors.

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SMURF2 Inhibitors Increase Effectiveness of MEK Inhibitors

Treatments that target a protein called MEK could work better when combined with drugs that inhibit a protein called SMURF2, according to research in the British Journal of the National Cancer Institute. MEK is involved in cell division and can be activated by BRAF and NRAS mutations. However, melanomas often resist MEK inhibitors. The researchers found that MEK inhibitors made melanoma cells grown in the laboratory produce too much of a protein called SMURF2. This in turn led to overproduction of another protein called MITF, which protects melanomas against MEK inhibitors. When treated with both a MEK inhibitor called selumetinib and a SMURF2 inhibitor, tumor growth was suppressed by 98% in mice.

 

Primary source: http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/content/105/1/33.abstract?sid=76bd523d-0853-4b55-abe1-b7781898c5a3

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ScienceDaily | Dec 19, 2012

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Drug Targets Two Common Melanoma Mutations

An experimental drug could help control some melanomas that have BRAF or NRAS mutations, according to a report at an American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting. Tumors shrank or did not get worse in 8 out of 35 patients with the most common BRAF mutation (V600E), and in 6 out of 28 patients with NRAS mutations. This is the first targeted treatment for melanomas that have NRAS mutations. BRAF and NRAS mutations can activate a protein called MEK that is involved in cell division. The experimental drug, which is called MEK162, is a MEK inhibitor. The side effects of MEK162, which included diarrhea, rashes and swelling, were manageable.

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MedPage Today | Jun 8, 2012

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