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Old Cancer Drug Gets Fresh Look

Old Cancer Drug Gets Fresh Look | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"When Dave deBronkart was diagnosed with advanced kidney cancer in 2007, he learned about a treatment called high-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) that fires up the body’s immune system to fight the disease. The response rate was not great — tumours shrank in only about 15% of patients. And as many as 4% of people died from the treatment. But some of those who responded survived for years or even decades."


Editor's note: IL-2 is an immunotherapy drug, meaning that it boosts a patient's own immune system to fight cancer. It and other new immunotherapies are showing promise for patients across many different cancer types.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Nature  |  May 27, 2014

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 28, 2014 5:19 PM

Nature  |  May 27, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 28, 2014 5:19 PM

Nature  |  May 27, 2014

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Personalized Vaccines May Boost Survival After Interleukin Treatment

Personalized Vaccines May Boost Survival After Interleukin Treatment | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

High doses of interleukin-2 (IL-2) can shrink melanomas but only 15% of people are still alive five years after this treatment. Now, new research shows that giving people vaccines against their own tumors could boost survival after IL-2 treatment. In a study of 149 people with melanomas that had spread, those treated with both IL-2 and a personalized vaccine lived far longer than those treated with IL-2 alone (nearly 40 vs. 12 months, respectively). In addition, people were far more likely to be alive at five years when given the vaccine before IL-2 treatment than when the order was reversed (46% vs. 14%, respectively).

Cancer Commons's insight:

Cancer Biotherapy & Radiopharmaceuticals  |  Jan 24, 2014

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Immunotherapy, BRAF Inhibitor Sequence Affected Outcomes in Metastatic Melanoma

Immunotherapy, BRAF Inhibitor Sequence Affected Outcomes in Metastatic Melanoma | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

"Prior treatment with immunotherapy did not limit response to BRAF inhibitors among patients with metastatic melanoma, according to results of a retrospective study.


"However, patients who underwent initial treatment with BRAF inhibitors and subsequently received immunotherapy with ipilimumab (Yervoy, Bristol-Myers Squibb) demonstrated poorer outcomes, results showed.


"Patients with BRAF-positive metastatic melanoma have several treatment options, including BRAF inhibitors vemurafenib (Zelboraf, Hoffmann-La Roche) and dabrafenib  (Taflinar, GlaxoSmithKline), the MEK inhibitor trametinib (Mekinist, GlaxoSmithKline), and the immunotherapy agents ipilimumab and interleukin-2. Yet, there are limited data with regard to optimal sequencing, according to researchers."

Cancer Commons's insight:

Healio  |  Mar 14, 2014

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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, March 15, 2014 4:19 AM

Prior treatment with BRAF inhibitors reduced subsequent response to immunotherapy. Prior treatment with ipilimumab had no effect on response to BRAF inhibitors.

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New Test May Predict Whether IL-2 Will Shrink Melanomas

While high-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) shrinks about 15% of melanomas, this U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved immunotherapy comes at the high cost of seizures and other major side effects. Now, a new study suggests there may be a way to tell when people with melanoma are benefiting from IL-2, sparing those who are not from unnecessarily enduring the downside of this treatment. The researchers found that when people with melanoma were treated with high-dose IL-2, those who did not benefit also had high levels of a particular type of white blood cell. These cells are regulatory T cells that produce a protein called ICOS (inducible T cell costimulator), which is linked to suppression of the immune system.

Cancer Commons's insight:

The Journal of Clinical Investigation │ Dec 2, 2013

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