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Cost of Cancer Drugs Strongly Affects Treatment Adherence

Cost of Cancer Drugs Strongly Affects Treatment Adherence | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

A study of over 1,500 cancer patients showed that drug costs have a significant effect on whether patients stick to their treatment plan. The study’s subjects had been prescribed imatinib (Gleevec), a treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia, a type of blood cancer. Patients with higher co-payments were 42% more likely to skip doses and 70% percent more likely to stop taking Gleevec entirely. Missing only 15% of prescribed Gleevec doses significantly raises the chance of the cancer developing drug resistance and relapsing. The study also found drastic differences in out-of-pocket treatment costs, with co-payments ranging from nothing to $4,792 for a 30-day supply of Gleevec. The average co-payment amount more than doubled over the 9-year course of the study.

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UNC Health Care  |  Jan 6, 2014

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, January 9, 12:03 AM

UNC Health Care  |  Jan 6, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, January 9, 10:40 AM

UNC Health Care  |  Jan 6, 2014

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Gleevec May Help Preserve Fertility After Chemotherapy

Gleevec May Help Preserve Fertility After Chemotherapy | Melanoma Dispatch | Scoop.it

Women who undergo chemotherapy often lose their fertility because the drugs used damage or kill their oocytes—immature egg cells stored in the ovaries. However, a recent study suggests that adding the cancer drug imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) to chemotherapy treatment may protect oocytes. Researchers treated mouse ovaries with the chemotherapy drug cisplatin (Platinol) either by itself or in combination with Gleevec, then implanted them into host mice. The oocytes from Gleevec-treated ovaries still suffered DNA damage from the Platinol exposure, but unlike oocytes treated with just Platinol, they did not die. Previous research suggests that the surviving oocytes could repair the damage over time after chemotherapy treatment ends. These findings offer the hope that Gleevec may help preserve fertility in chemotherapy patients.

Cancer Commons's insight:

Medical News Today | June 20, 2013

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 21, 2013 12:44 AM

Medical News Today | June 20, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 21, 2013 11:31 AM

Medical News Today | June 20, 2013

Cancer Commons's curator insight, June 21, 2013 11:31 AM

Medical News Today | June 20, 2013