Megan's A Midsummer Night's Dream
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Literary Criticism ~ The Comedy of the Lovers in A Midsummer Night's Dream

Literary Criticism ~ The Comedy of the Lovers in A Midsummer Night's Dream | Megan's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Megan Lefebvre's insight:

After completing the play of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, many critics gave reviews of Shakespeare’s soon to be famous play. One in particular criticism, written by M.E. Comtois, depicts the comedy of the lovers in the play. The comedy comes from the characters Hermia, Helena, Lysander, and Demetrius. With all of the personalities very similar, it is easier for Shakespeare to make their lives comedic. The repetition in what these characters would do next, made it seem as though they were puppets. When the characters move into the forest, the comedic aspect of the play really starts to set in. When Lysander and Hermia decide to sleep separately, their attitudes give a comedic feel but this also gives way to Puck’s misuse of the love potion. Puck’s mistake leads to an unraveling of the true love that has been staged. Helena received the worst of Puck’s mistake. When Lysander and Demetrius both turn out to fall in love with her, she takes it as a joke. Helena has loved Demetrius forever but is forced to move on for the sake of her own well-being. The constant bickering over who loves who is very repetitive in this portion of the play and it is seen as the most comedic part of the play. Comtois used valid information to back up his argument while writing this criticism. It can be seen that these four characters are only used as comedic pleasure and usually act in the same measures. Comtois’ “The Comedy of the Lovers in A Midsummer Night’s Dream” can be used as a valid source if need be, his points are precise and are backed up by resourceful facts.

 

 

Comtois, M. E. "The Comedy Of The Lovers In A Midsummer Night's Dream." Essays In Literature 12.1 (1985): 15-25. Literary Reference Center. Web. 25 Feb. 2013.

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Jennifer Houde's comment, March 10, 2013 11:40 PM
Again, I chose the same article! I fully agree with Comtois' literary criticism opinions, I was wondering if you also agreed?
matt turcotte's curator insight, April 3, 2013 9:49 PM

In this play there are many funny elements. Most of these funny things came from the four lovers in the play, lysander, demetrius, hermia, and helena. They have the weirdest love square going on where almost everyone loves someone but the other person does not love them back at some point in the play. there are many reviewers of the play but one that i thought was great was by M.E. Comtois who wrote about the comedy of the play. comotois makes points that the four lovers are simply there to provide comedy and nothing else

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Source ~ Hermia

Source ~ Hermia | Megan's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
EBSCOhost (ebscohost.com) serves thousands of libraries and other institutions with premium content in every subject area. Free LISTA: LibraryResearch.com
Megan Lefebvre's insight:

Shakespeare’s inspiration for Hermia can be seen in two different time periods. Hermia is the feminine version of the name Hermes, the Greek god of traders and thieves. Hermia’s appearance in the play represents the god. She is short and has dark hair, which echoes the representation of Hermes. Hermes is also known for trickery and mischief. Hermia is able “to trick her father rather than go through an arranged marriage, and like Hermes, is familiar with the love assignations of the gods.” Hermia is also known in the time of Aristotle. Hermia was recognized to have swoon Aristotle and take him away from his studies. Robert Albott acknowledged the fact that “Aristotle ‘became a slave to faire Hermia’.” In A Midsummer Night’s Dream Hermia is able to catch the attention of two men, Lysander and Demetrius. Both of these men will do anything and everything for her just like Aristotle to Hermia. Shakespeare could have used both of these historical and mythological ideas to create the character of Hermia when writing the play.

 

 

FINDLAY, ALISON. "Hermia." Women In Shakespeare (2010): 185-186. Literary Reference Center. Web. 12 Feb. 2013.

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Jennifer Houde's comment, March 10, 2013 11:38 PM
love your article choice! (Seeing I have the same one!) But I was wondering if you agree or disagree with Hermia having the same atributes such as being a trickster and a theif such as Hermes does?
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Historical Article ~ Shakespeare’s Wife

Historical Article ~ Shakespeare’s Wife | Megan's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Megan Lefebvre's insight:

During the Elizabethan Era, it was mandatory that women follow the orders of their fathers. Until they were married and their husband made the decisions for them, a woman's father had the final say. William Shakespeare married Ann Hathaway in 1582. "Everyone has noticed that Shakespeare was only eighteen when he married Ann and that she, almost surely pregnant, was eight years older." Assumptions have been made as to whether or not Ann was desperate for marriage or if it was forced on either her or Shakespeare. During A Midsummer Night's Dream, Hermia finds herself being forced to marry Demetrius by her father, Egeus. Even with her father’s commands, Hermia runs off with Lysander, her true love, during the cover of the night. Could it be that Shakespeare was relating his own personal, and possibly forced, marriage to the play or was it just a way to get his audience more intrigued in his play? The use of tragedy and rebellion in Shakespeare's plays allowed for a greater, more involved audience as to whether whom they wanted Hermia to marry and the hair-raising conflicts along the way. 

 

 

Ellis, Robert P. "Shakespeare’S Wife." Magill’S Literary Annual 2009 (2009): 1-3. Literary Reference Center. Web. 4 Feb. 2013.

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Jessica Blakemore's comment, March 13, 2013 4:50 PM
I love how the love triangle theme tied in to each piece of your scoop it; what made you think to base your entire project around that conflict in the play?
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Image ~ Lysander and Hermia

Image ~ Lysander and Hermia | Megan's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Megan Lefebvre's insight:

This image of Hermia and Lysander was created to go along with the play A Midsummer Night’s Dream written by Shakespeare. It shows the scene when Hermia and Lysander are in the woods after disobeying her father’s orders. They set out to run away and get married and never return. Along the way they meet the fairies of the forest. This image is a good representation of what the play is presenting and how you can picture the scene.

 

 

"Illustration Depicting Lysander and Hermia from A Midsummer Night's Dream." - E7440. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Feb. 2013.

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Video ~ Mickey Mouse - Midsummer Night's Dream

First television showing : September 25, 1999 Mickey, Minnie, Donald and Daisy compete in Shakespeare's tale of mismatched lovers and a special love potion.
Megan Lefebvre's insight:

Walt Disney gave way to an easy way for children to understand Shakespeare's plays. In a relevant re-interpretation of A Midsummer Night's Dream, Walt Disney creates a pathway for teachers to help their students learn Shakespeare at an early age. The works of Shakespeare are timeless but an easier interpretation allows for them to not only be remembered forever but in a suitable manner for all. 

 

 

"Mickey Mouse - Midsummer Night's Dream." YouTube. YouTube, 19 Jan. 2012. Web. 04 Feb. 2013.

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Matthew Bonas's comment, March 7, 2013 7:53 PM
Just a quick question Meg, did you see any other of Shakespeare's plays being done by the Disney characters while you researched this video? If so which plays?
Megan Lefebvre's comment, March 10, 2013 12:08 PM
I did not find any other videos produced by the Disney characters. To be sure I went back and checked and I find it interesting that they only decided to do this play. I wonder why..
Emily Richards's comment, March 12, 2013 4:18 PM
Maybe Disney didn't make anymore videos because this one did not have much popularity. As a child watching, they might not find it as interesting as an older person would with knowledge of the background of the play.