Mega Cities
3 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Matthew Price from Future_Cities
Scoop.it!

Your world of tomorrow: Self sufficient mega cities

Your world of tomorrow: Self sufficient mega cities | Mega Cities | Scoop.it
The cities of the world are facing multiple challenges (space, health, jobs and a conflict with the nature amid threats of climate change and global warming). Will we be able to build self-sufficient mega cities?
Via Trendcancan
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Matthew Price from Urbanism 3.0
Scoop.it!

Mega Cities Could Trigger Water Shortages and Social Unrest - Inter Press Service

“ Mega Cities Could Trigger Water Shortages and Social UnrestInter Press ServiceSTOCKHOLM, Aug 23, 2011 (IPS) - The rapid growth of urban population - described as one of the world's major demographic trends - has triggered an explosion of "mega cities"...”
Via Ana Valdés
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Matthew Price from Vertical Farm - Food Factory
Scoop.it!

Agenda 21 Mega-Cities Will Require Vertical Farming to Maximize Urban Space

Agenda 21 Mega-Cities Will Require Vertical Farming to Maximize Urban Space | Mega Cities | Scoop.it
“ RT @OccuCorporatism: Agenda 21 Mega-Cities Will Require Vertical Farming to Maximize Urban Space: Susanne Posel Occupy Corporatism No...”
Via Alan Yoshioka
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Matthew Price from Urban Places
Scoop.it!

Global city - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A global city (also called world city or sometimes alpha city or world center) is a city generally considered to be an important node in the global economic system. The concept comes from geography and urban studies and rests on the idea that globalization can be understood as largely created, facilitated, and enacted in strategic geographic locales according to a hierarchy of importance to the operation of the global system of finance and trade.

The most complex of these entities is the "global city", whereby the linkages binding a city have a direct and tangible effect on global affairs through socio-economic means.[1] The use of "global city", as opposed to "megacity", was popularized by sociologist Saskia Sassen in her 1991 work, The Global City: New York, London, Tokyo[2] though the term "world city" to describe cities that control a disproportionate amount of global business dates to at least the May 1886 description of Liverpool by The Illustrated London News.[3]Patrick Geddes also used the term "world city" later in 1915.[4] Cities can also fall from such categorization, as in the case of cities that have become less cosmopolitan and less internationally renowned in the current era.

Global city status is considered to be beneficial and desired, and because of this many groups have tried to classify and rank which cities are seen as world cities or non-world cities.[4] Although there is a consensus upon leading world cities,[5] the criteria upon which a classification is made can affect which other cities are included.[4] The criteria for identification tend either to be based on a yardstick value (e.g., if the producer-service sector is the largest sector then city X is a world city)[4] or on an imminent determination (if the producer-service sector of city X is greater than the combined producer-service sectors of N other cities then city X is a world city.)[4]


Via blmgeo
more...
No comment yet.