Mediocre Me
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Mediocre Me
Mediocre Me - How Saying No to the Status Quo Will Propel You from Ordinary to Extraordinary! (A Book by John Michel - Copyright 2013)
Curated by John Michel
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Rescooped by John Michel from Coaching & Neuroscience
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Neuroscience and organizational change – providing the evidence

Neuroscience and organizational change – providing the evidence | Mediocre Me | Scoop.it
In Hilary Scarlett’s Melcrum article of February 2013, Neuroscience – helping employees through change, she described some of the insights neuroscience is bringing to why people find organizational change difficult, and more usefully, what we c

Via Kasia Hein-Peters
John Michel's insight:

Neuroscience, the study of the nervous system including the brain, is set to transform our understanding of how people respond to the world of work. If we can understand the brain better, then we can help organizations, leaders, and all employees work more efficiently and effectively. 

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David Hain's curator insight, May 23, 2015 5:40 AM

Understanding of how our brains are wired offers huge possibilities for transformation - but only if transformation leaders inform themselves!

Tony Brugman (Bright & Company)'s curator insight, June 18, 2015 8:46 AM

Interesting stuff on impact of neuroscientific way of learning on performance and coping with change.

 

A research amongst leaders from four large organisations showed "learning about how our brains work can help us manage ourselves and lead people through change in more effective ways. (Because) it provides important insights into how we respond to change, what makes it easier for us to cope with uncertainty, what helps us focus, what affects our motivation and openness to change."

Gary Johnsen's curator insight, June 21, 2015 9:12 AM

Good summary on the brain and change management David Rock

Rescooped by John Michel from Wise Leadership
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The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread

The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread | Mediocre Me | Scoop.it
In the second of a two-part series Jonathan Gottschall discusses the unique power stories have to change minds and the key to their effectiveness.

Via Karen Dietz, Wise Leader™
John Michel's insight:

 When we enter into a story, we enter into an altered mental state--a state of high suggestibility.

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 21, 2013 12:50 PM

And so the discussion continues. Jonathan Gottschall writes his second blog post in his series about why/how storytelling works so well for businesses (and in general).


He does a good job in laying that foundation.


I have two thoughts for readers as they check out this post:


1. Gottschalk talks about story structure. Of course you have to know story structures to craft a good story. But structure alone won't make you successful IMHO. There's a whole lot more going on in telling a compelling story and structure is only one piece. Ask any creative writer! There are many different formulas. Most biz folks in the US are completely unaware that different groups/cultures have different story structures than what we see broadcasted on the Internet. Which in a global marketplace has huge significance! I'm not anti-story structure -- I just want us to understand its role better.


2. Stories and manipulation. Yes we are being influenced by stories -- and have always been. Yes we are being manipulated all the time. Yes, at some level we know this. No, access to information via the Internet and social media does not innoculate against this. Which is one reason why consumers are getting much more savvy about purchasing from companies who are socially and environmentally conscious.


Gottschalk focuses mostly on ads in this post. Ads are only one type of business storytelling however. He asks questions at the end, "Is storytelling really locked into a master formula?" No. 


Another question he asks is, "Hasn't the digital revolution paved the way for a new kind of storytelling?" and "Is it time for story 2.0?" LOL -- both remain to be seen and I look forward to the next post!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Charlie Dare's curator insight, October 22, 2013 7:55 PM

Many songs in particular Country or blues ballards tell a story often of love lost like "Me and Bobby Magee "..."

And so the discussion continues. Jonathan Gottschall writes his second blog post in his series about why/how storytelling works so well for businesses (and in general).

 

He does a good job in laying that foundation.

 

I have two thoughts for readers as they check out this post:

 

1. Gottschalk talks about story structure. Of course you have to know story structures to craft a good story. But structure alone won't make you successful IMHO. There's a whole lot more going on in telling a compelling story and structure is only one piece. Ask any creative writer! There are many different formulas. Most biz folks in the US are completely unaware that different groups/cultures have different story structures than what we see broadcasted on the Internet. Which in a global marketplace has huge significance! I'm not anti-story structure -- I just want us to understand its role better.

 

2. Stories and manipulation. Yes we are being influenced by stories -- and have always been. Yes we are being manipulated all the time. Yes, at some level we know this. No, access to information via the Internet and social media does not innoculate against this. Which is one reason why consumers are getting much more savvy about purchasing from companies who are socially and environmentally conscious.

 

Gottschalk focuses mostly on ads in this post. Ads are only one type of business storytelling however. He asks questions at the end, "Is storytelling really locked into a master formula?" No. 

 

Another question he asks is, "Hasn't the digital revolution paved the way for a new kind of storytelling?" and "Is it time for story 2.0?" LOL -- both remain to be seen and I look forward to the next post!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling"