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Does a 'fishy' lifestyle keep brains healthy? - Futurity

Does a 'fishy' lifestyle keep brains healthy? - Futurity | Medicine, Health, and CE | Scoop.it

 

Researchers have linked eating baked or broiled fish with brain health later in life—but say it's not about the omega-3 fatty acids.

The findings, published online in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, add to growing evidence that lifestyle factors contribute to brain health later in life.

Scientists estimate that more than 80 million people will have dementia by 2040, which could become a substantial burden to families and drive up health care costs, according to senior investigator James T. Becker, professor of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

Some studies have predicted that lifestyle changes such as a reduction in rates of physical inactivity, smoking, and obesity could lead to fewer cases of Alzheimer’s disease and other conditions of cognitive impairment in the elderly.

The antioxidant effect of omega-3 fatty acids, which are found in high amounts in fish, seeds, and nuts, and certain oils, also have been associated with improved health, particularly brain health.


Via Wildcat2030
Hieu Ngo's insight:

I chose this article because there is so little we, as mankind, know about our own brains. Different neuro-scientists will have different methods of doing things. And yet, some of what they do, albeit completely different, will have the same effect in the end. This article shows that while it may seem hard, we are learning new things about the human body every day as well as showing a way we can contribute to our own brain health later in life. 

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Scholarships - University of Houston

Scholarships - University of Houston | Medicine, Health, and CE | Scoop.it
Hieu Ngo's insight:

The University of Houston website had a lot of useful resources. From info telling about student life and how much tuition is to giving the prospecting student a large list of scholarships that they can apply for. After a long time of searching, I've managed to hit this gold mine. Not only does this school website have a lot of info on what school life and what programs they have, it also gives the prospecting student a list of scholarships that they can apply for. Overall from what I've seen,I've learned that this school has a fairly decent program so I will probably applying for this school as well.

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Kimberly Davis, MD: The intense life of a trauma surgeon > Yale Medical Group | Yale School of Medicine

Hieu Ngo's insight:

This is one of the few examples I've read about being a trauma surgeon. I find that this article explained it well though. On one hand, I like the idea of doing all that work and making a difference but on the other, I don't like the weird hours they work. So even though my current goal is to still be a trauma surgeon, I will be considering other jobs in the hospital setting as well.

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Be bold. Be brilliant. Be Berkeley. | UC Berkeley Office of Undergraduate Admissions

Hieu Ngo's insight:

Although this isn't my first choice, this is still on the list because they are known for their medical program. The downside is that it would cost a lot to go there along with the overall competition. From what I've heard, UC Berkeley is extremely hard to get in but once I get better scores on the ACT and SAT, I will apply anyways. It takes a lot to get in but as always, you never know until you try. 

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Rescooped by Hieu Ngo from A Tale of Two Medicines
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New, accurate epigenetic test could eliminate unnecessary repeat biopsies for prostate cancer

New, accurate epigenetic test could eliminate unnecessary repeat biopsies for prostate cancer | Medicine, Health, and CE | Scoop.it

More than one million prostate biopsies are performed each year in the U.S. alone, including many repeat biopsies for fear of cancer missed. Therefore there is a need to develop diagnostic tests that will help avoid unnecessary repeat biopsies. Two independent trials have now validated the performance of an epigenetic test that could provide physicians with a better tool to help eliminate unnecessary repeat prostate biopsies, report investigators in The Journal of Urology

 

In the previously reported independent MATLOC (Methylation Analysis To Locate Occult Cancer) trial, a multiplex epigenetic assay (ConfirmMDx for Prostate Cancer) profiling the APC, GSTP1 and RASSF1 genes demonstrated a negative predictive value of 90%. GSTP1 methylation is a specific biomarker for (prostate) cancer and this gene is methylated in up to 90% of prostate cancer cases. Additionally, APC and RASSF1 are important field effect markers and increase the diagnostic sensitivity of the assay.

 

A second multicenter study, DOCUMENT (Detection Of Cancer Using Methylated Events in Negative Tissue), has validated the performance of the epigenetic assay used in the MATLOC trial as an independent predictor of prostate cancer risk to guide decision making for repeat biopsy. In the DOCUMENT study patients with a negative biopsy were evaluated to identify those at low risk for harboring cancer missed, through biopsy sampling error, who could forego an unnecessary repeat biopsy. The validation study resulted in a negative predictive value of 88%.


Via Jonathan Middleton
Hieu Ngo's insight:

I liked this article because it informs the people of a new test that can eliminate the need to repeat biopsies for prostate cancer; thus, saving time, money, and effort. It goes to show that we are finding new ways to do things every day. There is always progress to be made and that there is so much to learn about the human body. 

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Rescooped by Hieu Ngo from A Tale of Two Medicines
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Flavonoids from each of the six structural groups reactivate BRM, a possible cofactor for the anticancer effects of flavonoids.

Flavonoids have been extensively studied and are well documented to have anticancer effects, but it is not entirely known how they impact cellular mechanisms to elicit these effects. In the course of this study, we found that a variety of different flavonoids readily restored Brahma (BRM) in BRM-deficient cancer cell lines. Flavonoids from each of the six different structural groups were effective at inducing BRM expression as well as inhibiting growth in these BRM-deficient cancer cells. By blocking the induction of BRM with shRNA, we found that flavonoid-induced growth inhibition was BRM dependent. We also found that flavonoids can restore BRM functionality by reversing BRM acetylation. In addition, we observed that an array of natural flavonoid-containing products both induced BRM expression as well as deacetylated the BRM protein. We also tested two of the BRM-inducing flavonoids (Rutin and Diosmin) at both a low and a high dose on the development of tumors in an established murine lung cancer model. We found that these flavonoids effectively blocked development of adenomas in the lungs of wild-type mice but not in that of BRMnull mice. These data demonstrate that BRM expression and function are regulated by flavonoids and that functional BRM appears to be a prerequisite for the anticancer effects of flavonoids both in vitro and in vivo.


Via Jonathan Middleton
Hieu Ngo's insight:

Some things just work. We don't know why but we will exploit it. This makes it nice when we do find out the reason behind the magic of it all. I liked this article because cancer is a risk everyone faces and thus, advances in medicine can help reduce said risk. I chose this mainly because cancer has had a role in everyone's lives. Whether it be from a family member or just someone you know. And anything that can help reduce the risk of it is always helpful.

 

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Rescooped by Hieu Ngo from Optimal Health and Aging-An Evidence-Based Medicine Approach
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Incidence of Childhood Obesity in the United States — NEJM

Incidence of Childhood Obesity in the United States — NEJM | Medicine, Health, and CE | Scoop.it
Original Article from The New England Journal of Medicine — Incidence of Childhood Obesity in the United States

Via Richard D. Hammer, M.D.
Hieu Ngo's insight:

Unlike my previous posts, this post is about a prevalent problem in society in America today. Childhood obesity. Children who are obese tend to develop unhealthy lifestyles and keep being obese. Times change and today, childhood obesity is becoming more and more common. Instead of showing new advances in medicine like in the other articles, I liked this one because it is a call to action. We need to help children and teach them to live healthy lifestyles, thus not being obese in the process.

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Richard D. Hammer, M.D.'s curator insight, August 1, 8:23 AM

Remember when obesity was a rarity in kids?  I do.  "The Fat Albert" show was on Saturday morning cartoons and we were out playing basketball or baseball after that rather than playing video games.  I doubt our politically correct society would tolerate that these days. Yet we seem to tolerate and fail to act on the growing epidemic of obesity.  The problem is there and the answer is clear.  While technology is good, food technology has led to 'chemical nutrition' which is really no nutrition at all.   So instead of pop-tarts with Mountain Dew for breakfast while playing video games, maybe we should reconsider the benefits of convenience and technology and what ultimately the outcome of our devices.

Rescooped by Hieu Ngo from The future of medicine and health
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‘Rewired’ mice show signs of longer lives with ...

‘Rewired’ mice show signs of longer lives with ... | Medicine, Health, and CE | Scoop.it
Mice lacking a specific protein (TRAP-1) live longer lives with fewer age-related illnesses, such as tissue degeneration, obesity, and spontaneous tumor formation, when compared with normal mice, researchers at The Wistar Institute have...

Via Wildcat2030
Hieu Ngo's insight:

I chose this article because it shows that even now, we are still making advances in medicine. What we have today would seem alien to the people of the '50s. And yet, there is always progress to be made. Although this is only in mice, maybe some day we can implement this in people too. 

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Rescooped by Hieu Ngo from The future of medicine and health
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Does a 'fishy' lifestyle keep brains healthy? - Futurity

Does a 'fishy' lifestyle keep brains healthy? - Futurity | Medicine, Health, and CE | Scoop.it

 

Researchers have linked eating baked or broiled fish with brain health later in life—but say it's not about the omega-3 fatty acids.

The findings, published online in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, add to growing evidence that lifestyle factors contribute to brain health later in life.

Scientists estimate that more than 80 million people will have dementia by 2040, which could become a substantial burden to families and drive up health care costs, according to senior investigator James T. Becker, professor of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

Some studies have predicted that lifestyle changes such as a reduction in rates of physical inactivity, smoking, and obesity could lead to fewer cases of Alzheimer’s disease and other conditions of cognitive impairment in the elderly.

The antioxidant effect of omega-3 fatty acids, which are found in high amounts in fish, seeds, and nuts, and certain oils, also have been associated with improved health, particularly brain health.


Via Wildcat2030
Hieu Ngo's insight:

I chose this article because there is so little we, as mankind, know about our own brains. Different neuro-scientists will have different methods of doing things. And yet, some of what they do, albeit completely different, will have the same effect in the end. This article shows that while it may seem hard, we are learning new things about the human body every day as well as showing a way we can contribute to our own brain health later in life. 

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Trauma Surgeon: Job Description & Career Requirements

Trauma Surgeon: Job Description & Career Requirements | Medicine, Health, and CE | Scoop.it
Prospective students searching for Trauma Surgeon: Job Description & Career Requirements found the articles, information, and resources on this page helpful.
Hieu Ngo's insight:

I found this article because it described what trauma surgeons had to to and what their pay was. I like learning about what they do in the hospital (emergencies) but the prospect of all that school is kind of daunting. I did manage to learn a lot of what they do and a few steps in what I had to do if I decide to continue on this path though.

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Cascade High School / Homepage

Cascade High School / Homepage | Medicine, Health, and CE | Scoop.it
Hieu Ngo's insight:

Although the Cascade website doesn't have a lot of scholarships, it was a start in my search. Some of the sites linked had sample essays with very generic and similar questions so I found that with a decent amount of editing, the essay would work for the scholarships. The problem was taking things out and changing things so it made sense. Making have the fluidity of a well-written essay was the thing that took the most time. From doing this, I did learn how to write a scholarship essay and it improved my writing skills overall.

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Admissions | Discover the UW

Admissions | Discover the UW | Medicine, Health, and CE | Scoop.it
Hieu Ngo's insight:

This is the school that I will be applying for once I take the ACT and the SATs again. Currently, my grade is good enough to apply but I would like better test scores. I've been told they have a decent medical program as well and since I would like to stay in state and then go to medical school, UW is my first choice for college after high school.

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Rescooped by Hieu Ngo from Preventive Medicine
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'Normal' bacteria vital for keeping intestinal lining intact

'Normal' bacteria vital for keeping intestinal lining intact | Medicine, Health, and CE | Scoop.it
Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found that bacteria that aid in digestion help keep the intestinal lining intact. The findings, reported online in the journal Immunity, could yield new therapies for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and a wide range of other ...

Via ClickTell Consulting
Hieu Ngo's insight:

I liked this article because bacteria is usually regarded as bad and yet, this article supports the fact that bacteria can be helpful to the human body. I find it interesting that we are finding out more about the human body every day.

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Rescooped by Hieu Ngo from The future of medicine and health
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Cancer screening with a simple "universal" blood test

Cancer screening with a simple "universal" blood test | Medicine, Health, and CE | Scoop.it
A universal blood test screening for cancer is the goal of a lab at the University of Bradford, reducing unneeded and expensive biopsies.

 

Although many dread the prick of a blood test, most would find it a preferable testing method to invasive and expensive biopsies. That's why a blood test for cancer is the goal of many research efforts, including one at the University of Bradford in the UK, where researchers are claiming to have devised a simple universal blood test for the disease that relies on the fact that white blood cells in cancer patients are already damaged from battling cancerous cells.

"White blood cells are part of the body’s natural defense system," says Professor Diana Anderson, who led the research. "We know that they are under stress when they are fighting cancer or other diseases, so I wondered whether anything measurable could be seen if we put them under further stress with UVA light."

To put her theory to the test, the University of Bradford team used a comet assay, which involves exposing DNA to UV light and applying an electric field to induce it to travel through an agar medium. The more damaged the DNA, the more elongated its comet-like tail, as the structure is no longer as tightly compressed together.

"We found that people with cancer have DNA which is more easily damaged by ultraviolet light than other people," says Anderson. "So the test shows the sensitivity to damage of all the DNA – the genome – in a cell."


Via Wildcat2030
Hieu Ngo's insight:

I found this interesting because it provides an easy alternative to find if someone has cancer as opposed to making them go through a series of procedures which can potentially be very expensive in the end. Overall, this article shows that there isn't necessarily one way to do something and that sometimes, there is a better and easier way to having healthy human beings.

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Rescooped by Hieu Ngo from A Tale of Two Medicines
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Laropiprant is the Bad One; Niacin is/was/will always be the Good One

Laropiprant is the Bad One; Niacin is/was/will always be the Good One | Medicine, Health, and CE | Scoop.it

Niacin has been used for over 60 years in tens of thousands of patients with tremendously favorable therapeutic benefit (Carlson 2005). In the first-person NY Times best seller, "8 Weeks to a Cure for Cholesterol," the author describes his journey from being a walking heart attack time bomb to a becoming a healthy individual. He hails high-dose niacin as the one treatment that did more to correct his poor lipid profile than any other (Kowalski 2001). Many clinical studies have shown that high doses of niacin (3,000-5,000 mg plain old immediate release niacin taken in divided doses spread out over the course of a day) cause dramatic reductions in total mortality in patients that experienced previous strokes (Creider 2012). High dose niacin has also been clinically proven to provide positive transformational relief to many schizophrenics in studies involving administration of immediate release niacin in multi-thousand-milligram quantities to greater than 10,000 patients (Hoffer 1964; Osmond 1962). Most importantly, after 60 years of use the safety profile for niacin (especially immediate release niacin) remains far safer than the safest drug (Guyton 2007).


Via Jonathan Middleton
Hieu Ngo's insight:

The previous posts were about how we are always making progress in medicine. This one is the same, just in a different way. In medicine, there will always be controversy. A prime example of this controversy is the vaccine vs. anti-vaccine argument. Another controversy is the one shown in this article: whether Niacin is beneficial to humans or not. This article further solidifies the fact that overall, Niacin is beneficial and can "cause dramatic reductions in total mortality in patients".

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Rescooped by Hieu Ngo from The future of medicine and health
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Single injection reverses type 2 diabetes symptoms in mice without side effects

Single injection reverses type 2 diabetes symptoms in mice without side effects | Medicine, Health, and CE | Scoop.it

There are numerous research efforts underway to develop new treatments and improve the lives of people suffering type 2 diabetes, whose ranks have increased dramatically in recent decades due in large part to the so-called obesity epidemic. A new generation of safer and more effective diabetes drugs could be in the offing with researchers at the Salk Institute discovering that when mice with diet-induced diabetes were given a single injection of a protein, their blood sugar levels were restored to a healthy range for more than two days.

Although type 2 diabetes can sometimes be managed through a healthy diet and regular exercise in the initial stages, tablets that boost the body's production of insulin are generally prescribed as the disease progresses. Such tablets can have side effects, including nausea and diarrhea, and aren't suitable for everyone, such as pregnant women and those with severe liver, kidney or heart disease. They can also cause blood glucose levels to drop too low, potentially resulting in hypoglycemia.

Now Salk researchers have found that injecting obese mice with the equivalent of type 2 diabetes in humans with a single dose of protein FGF1 quickly restored their blood glucose levels to normal levels where they remained for more than two days. Importantly, even when given high doses, the mice suffered none of the side effects common to most current diabetes treatments, such as weight gain or heart and liver problems.


Via Wildcat2030
Hieu Ngo's insight:

There are so many diseases and health problems out there. Just as it seems when we might have gotten rid of a problem/disease, a new one pops up to take its place. Yet, this article shows that we can and will adapt as we have time and time again. Mankind will continue living on. Curing type 2 diabetes in mice is just a small step in curing type 2 diabetes in people. But sometimes, one small step can make all the difference.

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