medical toursim
Follow
Find
126 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Sieg Holle from University-Lectures-Online
Scoop.it!

12 new universities join Coursera, now offering more than 100 courses

Coursera has announced that 12 universities — including three international institutions — will be joining Princeton University, Stanford University, University of Michigan, and University of Pennsylvania in offering Coursera classes, according to the Coursera Blog.

 

On Coursera, you will now be able to access world-class courses from:

California Institute of TechnologyDuke UniversityÉcole Polytechnique Federale de LausanneGeorgia Institute of TechnologyJohns Hopkins UniversityPrinceton UniversityRice UniversityStanford UniversityUniversity of California, San FranciscoUniversity of EdinburghUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUniversity of MichiganUniversity of PennsylvaniaUniversity of TorontoUniversity of VirginiaUniversity of Washington

You’ll be able to choose from more than 100 courses, from Professor Dan Ariely’s course on irrational behavior, to learning how to program in Scala (taught from the creator of Scala, Professor Martin Odersky from EPFL), to the legendary UVA course “How Things Work” with Professor Louis Bloomfield.

 

You can check out the most current course list here — keep in mind you can enroll in a class even if the start date is TBA.

 

To date, 700,000 students from 190 countries have participated in classes on Coursera, with more than 1.55 million course enrollments total.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Sieg Holle's insight:

Your self help program

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sieg Holle from M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications
Scoop.it!

Online Content Promotion through Twitter

Online Content Promotion through Twitter | medical toursim | Scoop.it
Blog post at Million Social Help :

No matter how Pulitzer-worthy your content may be, It wouldn’t have much value if none of your target demographic gets to read it. In [..]

Via Danielle M. Villegas
Sieg Holle's insight:

Brantford branding miscalculated social media lesson 

more...
Danielle M. Villegas's curator insight, February 13, 9:04 AM

Former TechCommGeekMom guest blogger, Allie Cooper, wrote this gem.  Great advice in here, Allie!
--techcommgeekmom 

Rescooped by Sieg Holle from M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications
Scoop.it!

California regulator seeks to shut down 'learn to code' bootcamps

California regulator seeks to shut down 'learn to code' bootcamps | medical toursim | Scoop.it
Unless they comply with California regulators, these organizations face imminent closure and a hefty $50,000 fine.

Via Danielle M. Villegas
Sieg Holle's insight:

bad precedent - stop this cancer from spreading

more...
Danielle M. Villegas's curator insight, January 31, 1:59 PM

The situation here is a slippery slope. On the one hand, it does seem like government telling these places what they can and can't teach. If it isn't being taught in a conventional setting, what's the problem in setting up a business that provides a valuable service? The key, in the whole thing, is consumer fraud. All these code academies may be on the up and up, but how is anyone to know for sure unless there is some sort of regulation in place. What makes is cringe-worthy to me in reading this is that I start wondering about where the fine line is between innovation and crushing that, and between providing opportunity and stunting opportunity.  

 

This starts to bring up the question about online learning and regulations on that. When I started in the IT business, it was as the content manager of one of the first e-learning websites out there about 20 years ago. At the time, the state where we were located had levelled some legal challenges to us because the owners used the term "university" for the name of their product. It was a bit of a firestorm, but it was a similar situation to this one. I don't know how it eventually got resolved, but I know the "university" part was kept somehow as time went on.  The content of the university was driven by third-party content from established educational curriculum publishers, and content provided by the clients that were specific to their own needs, and would be exclusive to the client. Nobody was really reinventing the wheel here, just reinventing how the information was distributed. I'm wondering if the same sort of situation is happening here with these coding bootcamps. 

 

The other part of this is how it affects online learning. Unless there's something I don't know (and it's totally possible that I don't know in this case), but is Khan Academy subject to these same regulations, even though they are free (or at least subsidized by several investors such as Microsoft)? If not, why not? What about other MOOC-distribuiting sites? It seems to me that California might be opening up a Pandora's box of problems, because it would be difficult to draw the line--or would it? 

 

For the consumer reasons, I understand what California is doing. I don't want to get some sort of credential saying that I took a course and then find out that it's not recognized or that I really didn't learn a damn thing. That part, I get. But the problem lies in determining what gets regulated and what doesn't. Is it only regulated if someone pays money to learn?  Where do we draw the line between what's available at conventional places of learning such as vocational education schools, schools, universities/colleges, business schools and the like, and online schooling or non-conventional schools such as Khan Academy, MOOCs, Udemy, Coursera, or these bootcamps?

 

It's definitely worth a discussion, because I don't think there's an easy answer to this question. 

 

What do you think? Feel free to have a respectful discussion below in the comments. 

Scooped by Sieg Holle
Scoop.it!

Arrogant Worms - Kill The Dog Next Door - YouTube

I love this song, and seeing as how no one has uploaded it yet (at least not the full thing), I may as well! I didn't care about making a video, so enjoy sta...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sieg Holle
Scoop.it!

E-Cigarettes: A $1.5 Billion Industry Braces for FDA Regulation

E-Cigarettes: A $1.5 Billion Industry Braces for FDA Regulation | medical toursim | Scoop.it
E-cigarettes are cheaper, cleaner, more flavorful, and less harmful than tobacco, and could make entrepreneurs billions. They could also go up in a puff of regulatory smoke
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sieg Holle from Winnipeg Market Update
Scoop.it!

Wal-Mart to invest $500-million in Canada, create 7,500 jobs

Wal-Mart to invest $500-million in Canada, create 7,500 jobs | medical toursim | Scoop.it
Retailer plans to complete 35 super centre projects by Jan. 31, 2015

Via Kyra Winfield
Sieg Holle's insight:

Good news

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sieg Holle from Social Media Bites!
Scoop.it!

5 Google+ Features You Probably Aren’t Taking Advantage Of

5 Google+ Features You Probably Aren’t Taking Advantage Of | medical toursim | Scoop.it
A simple list of Google+ features to help improve your user experience, how you post your content, look at performance, and audit your brand page

Via David Blundell
more...
Andrew Taylor's curator insight, February 17, 11:31 AM

Really great information.

Randy Bauer's curator insight, March 6, 7:19 PM

Dive deep into Google Plus and you will probably discover more. The Ripple view is a great way to measure your social shares throughout google plus. Have Fun.

YOBSN Money's curator insight, April 30, 1:11 PM

Great platform and growing all the time. These tips should be well worth the read.

Rescooped by Sieg Holle from Winnipeg Market Update
Scoop.it!

Stores feel holiday sting

Stores feel holiday sting | medical toursim | Scoop.it

NEW YORK -- The financial strains and shifting shopping habits of North Americans have led to uneven... - Business - Winnipeg Free Press.


Via Kyra Winfield
Sieg Holle's insight:

Adaption is good for the cstomer?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sieg Holle
Scoop.it!

Opinion: For Ian’s sake — change

Opinion: For Ian’s sake — change | medical toursim | Scoop.it
Police officers face stresses inherent to the job and need more helping dealing with them than they’re getting
Sieg Holle's insight:

Good cops need help and are part of the solution just like the rest of us

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sieg Holle
Scoop.it!

▶ John Stossel's Illegal Everything - YouTube

Johan Norberg (Economic Freedom In Action) joins John to share the proven recipe for prosperity. http://www.LibertyPen.com
Sieg Holle's insight:

push back this cancer -

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sieg Holle
Scoop.it!

Two-in-one nanoparticles exploit tumor cells to precisely deliver multiple drugs

Two-in-one nanoparticles exploit tumor cells to precisely deliver multiple drugs | medical toursim | Scoop.it
A nanoparticle delivery system exploits biochemical and cellular pathways in tumor cells to deliver two different drugs to different locations in the cell. ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sieg Holle
Scoop.it!

We See Thee Rise: Canada's Emerging Role In Policy Leadership

We See Thee Rise: Canada's Emerging Role In Policy Leadership | medical toursim | Scoop.it
Changing the economic face of Canada and of North America.
Sieg Holle's insight:

ccongratulation to c anada poliy freedom of thought enhancing think tanks 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sieg Holle from Office Environments Of The Future
Scoop.it!

Building a Healthier Medical Facility

Building a Healthier Medical Facility | medical toursim | Scoop.it
Pacific Northwest Inlander Building a Healthier Medical Facility Pacific Northwest Inlander "There's so much more to do it in a health care facility, compared to your standard office building," says Traci Hanegan, a mechanical engineer in Spokane...

Via Color-Art
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sieg Holle from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Microrobotic technique combines 3D printing and tissue engineering

Microrobotic technique combines 3D printing and tissue engineering | medical toursim | Scoop.it

) Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) and Carnegie Mellon University have introduced a unique micro-robotic technique to assemble the components of complex materials, the foundation of tissue engineering and 3D printing, described in the Jan. 28, 2014, issue of Nature Communications ("Untethered micro-robotic coding of three-dimensional material composition").


Tissue engineering and 3D printing have become vitally important to the future of medicine for many reasons. The shortage of available organs for transplantation, for example, leaves many patients on lengthy waiting lists for life-saving treatment. Being able to engineer organs using a patient's own cells can not only alleviate this shortage, but also address issues related to rejection of donated organs. Developing therapies and testing drugs using current preclinical models have limitations in reliability and predictability. Tissue engineering provides a more practical means for researchers to study cell behavior, such as cancer cell resistance to therapy, and test new drugs or combinations of drugs to treat many diseases.


The presented approach uses untethered magnetic micro-robotic coding for precise construction of individual cell-encapsulating hydrogels (such as cell blocks). The micro-robot, which is remotely controlled by magnetic fields, can move one hydrogel at a time to build structures. This is critical in tissue engineering, as human tissue architecture is complex, with different types of cells at various levels and locations. When building these structures, the location of the cells is significant in that it will impact how the structure will ultimately function. "Compared with earlier techniques, this technology enables true control over bottom-up tissue engineering," explains Tasoglu.


Tasoglu and Demirci also demonstrated that micro-robotic construction of cell-encapsulating hydrogels can be performed without affecting cell vitality and proliferation. Further benefits may be realized by using numerous micro-robots together in bioprinting, the creation of a design that can be utilized by a bioprinter to generate tissue and other complex materials in the laboratory environment."


Our work will revolutionize three-dimensional precise assembly of complex and heterogeneous tissue engineering building blocks and serve to improve complexity and understanding of tissue engineering systems," said Metin Sitti, professor of Mechanical Engineering and the Robotics Institute and head of CMU's NanoRobotics Lab.


"We are really just beginning to explore the many possibilities in using this micro-robotic technique to manipulate individual cells or cell-encapsulating building blocks." says Demirci. "This is a very exciting and rapidly evolving field that holds a lot of promise in medicine."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Sieg Holle's insight:

Towards our age of abundance and self sufficiency and personal choice?

more...
Deborah Verran's curator insight, February 14, 10:07 PM

Another interesting step in the research that is being performed in the tissue engineering sphere. However there is a lot more research required before bioengineered tissues can be used for transplantation into humans

Rescooped by Sieg Holle from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

Sloan-C: Managing the MOOC Momentum

Sloan-C: Managing the MOOC Momentum | medical toursim | Scoop.it
Four strategic considerations for college and university leaders in 2014 In the fall of 2011 when then-Stanford professor Sebastian Thrun unveiled the first Massively Open Online Course (MOOC) by o...

Via Dennis T OConnor
Sieg Holle's insight:

market review for the future of education? 

more...
Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, February 9, 2:12 PM

Special thanks to Witt Salley for pointing this out. 

Paula King, Ph.D.'s curator insight, February 10, 11:48 AM

Interesting MOOC infograph.

Sanjay Malaviya's curator insight, February 12, 11:29 AM

Managing the MOOC Momentum

Rescooped by Sieg Holle from M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications
Scoop.it!

Quality Content is in the Eye of the Consumer | Content Rules, Inc.

Quality Content is in the Eye of the Consumer | Content Rules, Inc. | medical toursim | Scoop.it

Via Danielle M. Villegas
more...
Danielle M. Villegas's curator insight, January 28, 8:57 PM

Val Swisher has written yet another excellent article that gets to the heart of content. Just today, in fact, I was questioning this very topic, and not understanding why more people don't understand these basics. Read this throughly if you write or manage any content, because this article will help to boil it all down for you and get you in the right (or "write") mentality. Must, must, MUST read!

--techcommgeekmom

Scooped by Sieg Holle
Scoop.it!

Massive open online forces

Massive open online forces | medical toursim | Scoop.it
UNIVERSITIES have not changed much since students first gathered in Oxford and Bologna in the 11th century. Teaching has been constrained by technology. Until...
Sieg Holle's insight:

Embrace the  future

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sieg Holle from Government cancer treatment
Scoop.it!

What's really killing the Mounties | Macleans.ca - Canada - Features

Visit Macleans.ca for the latest news, opinion and analysis on issues affecting Canadians covering politics, health, business, consumer issues culture, entertainment and more.
more...
Sieg Holle's curator insight, February 1, 11:03 AM

A sad state of affairs .

Rescooped by Sieg Holle from Social Media Bites!
Scoop.it!

How to Respond to a Social Media Crisis

How to Respond to a Social Media Crisis | medical toursim | Scoop.it
Does your brand have a crisis response plan in place? Do you know what tactics to use to defend your reputation online?

Via David Blundell
Sieg Holle's insight:

Act do not react or hide

more...
David Blundell's curator insight, January 16, 11:17 PM

Some very good pragmatic tips on how to handle a social media crisis . . .

nzwood51x's curator insight, January 26, 9:05 PM

This guy is just awesome...love his stuff.

Philip Brown's curator insight, February 24, 12:39 PM

Good tips....add one more - plan for the crisis up front; always best to know how to swim before you get in the water!

Scooped by Sieg Holle
Scoop.it!

Opinion: How Canada Views the Keystone Stall

Opinion: How Canada Views the Keystone Stall | medical toursim | Scoop.it
Frontier Centre for Public Policy vice president Bob Murray on how the pipeline delay could affect U.S.-Canada relations. Photo: Associated Press
Sieg Holle's insight:

Well said -wth a hint of the competitive alternatve. A pipeline wll be built -which way  North south or east west?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sieg Holle
Scoop.it!

The real healthcare crisis

The real healthcare crisis | medical toursim | Scoop.it
At Davos in the Swiss Alps this week the bankers and thinkers and business leaders who constitute the amen corner of globalization will be addressing the implications of longevity and demographics.
Sieg Holle's insight:

gOOD INSIGHT

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sieg Holle
Scoop.it!

Your Brain on Nature: Forest Bathing and Reduced Stress - Natural Health - MOTHER EARTH NEWS

Your Brain on Nature: Forest Bathing and Reduced Stress - Natural Health - MOTHER EARTH NEWS | medical toursim | Scoop.it
Studies show shinrin-yoku, also known as forest bathing or time spent in green spaces, can reduce the stress hormone cortisol and increase your immune defense system.
Sieg Holle's insight:

go  for a walk in the forest has new meaning it is  really good for you

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sieg Holle
Scoop.it!

Ask a Doctor: Medical Marijuana, My Final Chapter - CARP Canada

Ask a Doctor: Medical Marijuana, My Final Chapter - CARP Canada | medical toursim | Scoop.it
  The Canadian Medical Association, the College of Family Physicians of Canada and the Federation of Medical Regulatory Authorities of Canada are against the new regulations of Health Canada, because the effectiveness and safety of smoked cannabis...
Sieg Holle's insight:

A very poor position that is intellectually cya cowardly and real fact science unworthy. Why not let people chose by choice not force ? You have had more then 50 years to test this -there are numerous credible tests done that support free choice on this issue- Please get out of the way of real economi c health options.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sieg Holle from E-Learning and Online Teaching
Scoop.it!

180 MOOCs to Start the New Year (Is This the Crest of the Wave?)

180 MOOCs to Start the New Year (Is This the Crest of the Wave?) | medical toursim | Scoop.it
If you haven’t tried a free MOOC, I’d do it sooner than later. In recent weeks, the whole MOOC project took a hit when a University of Pennsylvania study found what was becoming empirically obvious — that MOOCs generally have very low participation and completion rates, and what’s more, most of the students taking the courses are “disproportionately educated, male, [and] wealthy,” and from the United States. This study, combined with other disappointing experiments and findings, will likely make universities think twice about sinking money into creating MOOCs (they can cost anywhere from $15,000 to $50,000 to develop). It might take another 6-12 months to see the shift. But I’d hazard a guess that this January might be the peak of the free MOOC trend. Enjoy them while they last. Whatever their shortcomings, they can be quite informative, and you can’t beat the price.

Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
Steve Vaitl's curator insight, January 7, 10:49 AM

Very little of this do I find this surprising.

MFaculty's curator insight, January 7, 10:44 PM

The insights revealed through the previous studies serves to codify what many educators, and even more marketers knew intuitively; free always begs the question of quality. Don't hear what I'm not saying. I'm not saying ALL MOOCs are low quality, I'm merely saying that without academic rigor and effective management, even the best intentions can slide off the rails.

 

I too had noted a number of previous MOOC supporters distancing themselves from the initiatives. Was there ever an identified demand for MOOCs, or were they simply a result of benevolent thinking? Regardless, it is interesting that the 'target audience' for MOOCs are apparently the ones taking least advantage of them. Perhaps the age old marketing rendition of supply and demand has merit still has merit.

Tammy Morley's curator insight, January 8, 7:43 PM

Food for thought.

Scooped by Sieg Holle
Scoop.it!

Using a Long-Distance MBA to Build an Entrepreneurial Career

Using a Long-Distance MBA to Build an Entrepreneurial Career | medical toursim | Scoop.it
Rooda AlNeama is building a startup in Dubai while she completes an online MBA at the University of Liverpool in the U.K.
Sieg Holle's insight:

tech to the rescue

more...
No comment yet.