Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues
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How to Minimize Distractions During Your Study Time When Taking Courses Online

How to Minimize Distractions During Your Study Time When Taking Courses Online | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it
Taking online courses sounds like a great idea at first glance. There's no need to go to a physical location, you can study and complete your work when it's convenient for you, and the courses are ...
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The Early Days of Ebola vs. HIV: Similarities and Differences

The Early Days of Ebola vs. HIV: Similarities and Differences | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it
In the early 1980's a new disease entered the U.S. that had doctors scrambling to find answers. A number of gay men in both New York and California were experiencing treatment resistant diseases an...
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Six ways social media can improve your health

Six ways social media can improve your health | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it

Social media has markedly changed the way people interact with their healthcare providers, changing the status quo when it comes to accountability and taking control of decisions. The factors that set social media apart from other forms of communication include its immediacy, interactivity, and that the fact that a significant amount of the content is developed by the user, rather than the provider.


As is generally the case with social media, its effects have been both positive and negative. Understanding these effects is central to ensuring that we get the most use out of it, with minimal risks.


In its recent publication, Social Media “likes” healthcare, PWC found that 42% of consumers in the United States have used social media to access health-related consumer reviews (e.g. of treatments or physicians). Nearly 30% have supported a health cause, 25% have posted about their health experience, and 20% have joined a health forum or community. The implication here is that there is an enormous amount of information available that has been created by the consumers of health services.


Read more: http://forumblog.org/2014/06/social-media-health/


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Engaging Existing Patients Through Social Media

Engaging Existing Patients Through Social Media | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it

The success of any medical practice depends on its ability to bring in new patients and generate new business. However, it's important not to forget to engage with your existing patients. After all, satisfied patients are the ones who can help boost the reputation of your practice by sharing their experience with family or friends, and even with referring physicians.

 

Existing patients want to continue to feel a connection with your medical practice, even if they've been coming to you for years.

 

It's important to speak to your existing patients as if you know them. Make sure that your website contains links to your Facebook and Twitter pages, and regularly update your social media channel with interesting, relevant content that will truly  speak to your online audience.

What kind of information can you post on your social media channels that will hook your existing patients?

 

Any changes in your practice, such as a new doctor, service or locationAny medical articles or news that are relevant to either your practice, or the healthcare industry as a wholeAny achievements or awards you or your staff have received

 

Read more: http://www.mednet-tech.com/newsletter/blogs/engaging-existing-patients-through-social-media


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Saliva Test Capable of Diagnosing Oral Cancer and Diabetes

Saliva Test Capable of Diagnosing Oral Cancer and Diabetes | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it
A new molecular test has the ability to detect oral cancer and diabetes.

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How Twitter can be used to address specific health issues

How Twitter can be used to address specific health issues | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it

A new study led by Jenine K. Harris, PhD, examined the use of the hashtag #childhoodobesity in tweets to track Twitter conversations about the issue of overweight kids.

 

The study noted that conversations involving childhood obesity on Twitter don't often include comments from representatives of government and public health organizations that likely have evidence relating to how best to approach this issue. The authors think maybe they should.

 

Twitter use is growing nationwide. In its 2014 Twitter update, the Pew Research Center found that Twitter is used more by those in lower-income groups, which traditionally are more difficult to reach with health information.

 

While younger Americans also are more likely to use Twitter, it is used equally across education groups and is used more by non-white Americans than whites.

 

This, Harris said, is one of the reasons Twitter is an avenue that the academic and government sources with accurate health information should consider taking advantage of in order to reach a wide variety of people.

 

"I think public health so far doesn't have a great game plan for using social media, we're still laying the foundation for that," she said. "We're still learning what works.

 

"Public health communities, politicians, and government sources -- people who really know what works -- should join in the conversation. Then we might be able to make an impact," she said.

  

more at http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140710151723.htm

 


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askdrmaxwell's curator insight, July 14, 2014 6:09 PM

Do you use social media for your health questions and research? 

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The pacemaker of the future might be made of heart cells

The pacemaker of the future might be made of heart cells | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it

Cardiologists in Los Angeles have developed a gene-therapy technique that allows them to transform working heart-muscle cells into cells that regulate a pigs’ heartbeat. This procedure, described today in the Science Translational Medicine, restored normal heart rates for two weeks in pigs that usually rely on mechanical pacemakers. The experiment, researchers say, could lead to lifesaving therapies for people who suffer infections following the implantation of a mechanical pacemaker.

 

"We have been able for the first time to create a biological pacemaker using minimally invasive methods and to show that the new pacemaker suffices to support the demands of daily life," Eduardo Marbán, a cardiologist at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute and lead author of the study, told the press yesterday. The approach is practical, added Eugenio Cingolani, a cardiogeneticist also at Cedars-Sinai and a co-author of the study, because "no open-heart surgery is required to inject this gene."

 

In the study, researchers injected a gene called Tbx18 into the pigs’ hearts. This gene, which is also found in humans, reprogrammed a small number of heart-muscle cells into cells that emit electrical impulses and drive the beating of the heart. The area in which this change occurred — about the size of a peppercorn — doesn't normally initiate heartbeats.

 

"We were able to get the biological pacemaker to turn on within 48 hours," Marbán said. To get the gene to the heart, the researchers sent a modified virus into the right ventricle through a catheter. The viral vector isn’t harmful, the researchers said, because the virus they employed was engineered to be "replication deficient" — meaning that it will not reproduce and spread beyond the heart.


Overall, the results of the study demonstrate that the pigs who received the gene therapy experienced an increase in heart rate that allowed them to be much less dependent on backup pacemakers. In contrast, the backup pacemakers were responsible for more than 40 percent of the beats in pigs who didn’t receive the gene therapy, but still underwent surgery.

 

more at http://www.theverge.com/2014/7/16/5906563/biological-pacemakers-gene-therapy-heart-muscle-cells

 


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Hospitals Use Tablets as Extension of EHRs

Hospitals Use Tablets as Extension of EHRs | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it

Some leading hospitals are increasingly turning to tablets -- iPads and iPad-like devices -- as a way to improve access to patient health records for providers walking the hospital halls.


Such devices are seen as a way to work around clunky desktops and make greater use of an electronic medical record's (EMR) capabilities.

"Tablets, in our experience, are very effective if you need not the entire EMR, but a slice of information," Will Morris, MD, associate chief medical information officer at the Cleveland Clinic, told MedPage Today.


The hospital is piloting the use of tablets with a few sectors of its workforce, such as its rapid response teams. Clinicians can look up patient information on their way to a patient who is crashing and better know how to treat the patient when they arrive at their room.

Other hospital staff use them on rounds; data entered is synced with the hospital's full EMR.


"The more we can assist our providers in being more efficient, the better the value proposition," Morris said.


Hospitals are increasingly turning to mobile devices as a cost-effective extension of their EMRs, making them more usable and friendly, David Collins, senior director of mHIMSS, the mobile wing of the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS), in Chicago, said.


"You spend millions of dollars for EHR [electronic health record] implementation," Collins toldMedPage Today in a phone interview. "But if you can spend $300 on a tablet and issue these to providers so they're more mobile, it's really a minimal cost for the payoff."


At the Cleveland Clinic, officials don't have data on quality improvement just yet, but Morris said they have seen an improvement in how long it takes nurses to enter vital signs.


"It's not going to be the tablet that transforms practice," he said. "It's going to be 'How do you use the data coming out of your EMR, applied with clinical rules, to empower the clinical practice?' "


more at http://www.medpagetoday.com/PracticeManagement/InformationTechnology/44239
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Inforth Technologies's curator insight, February 19, 2014 8:13 AM

We have had great success using the Microsoft Surface Tablets to access the EHR.

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5 Medical Technologies Revolutionizing Healthcare

5 Medical Technologies Revolutionizing Healthcare | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it

A deeper look at five technologies that are currently advancing exponentially and radically reshaping healthcare. In other words, for the long suffering, there is plenty of hope to go around.

 

3-D printing 

 

3D printing is already making its presence felt in medical device world. Ninety-five percent of all hearing aids are today 3D printed. This tech is also pushing into prosthetics. There are custom-made back braces for scoliosis patients and casts for broken bones (perforated with holes so people can finally scratch through their casts) and, in the latest development, 3D printed facial prosthetics (noses, ears, etc.).

 

 Artificial Intelligence
 

It started with IBM’s Watson. After besting humans on Jeopardy back in 2011, Big Blue sent their thinking machine to medical school. Now loaded up with everything from journal articles to medical textbooks to actual information culled from patient interviews, the supercomputer has remerged as an incredibly robust diagnostic aid that is already being used for everything from training medical students to managing the treatment of lung cancer.

 

 Brain- Computer Interfaces  

We’ve been hearing about BCIs for a little while now. The tech originated out of the desire to help paraplegics and quadriplegics control computer cursors with only their brains. Of course, these developments will continue apace, bringing far more liberation to the disabled then ever before possible, but the bigger news is in BCIs that can control robotic limbs or even restore function to paralyzed limbs.

 

Robotics:


The robots are coming, the robots are coming, the robots are, well, here. Whether we’re talking the da Vinci Surgical System—which has performed over 20,000 operations since its 2000 debut—or newer developments like the nanobots swimming through our bloodstream and scraping plaque from our arteries, robots are already deep into the healthcare space.

 

Point-of-Care Diagnostics


In medicine, one of the major promises of technology is patient empowerment—especially when it comes to diagnostics. Suddenly, patients no longer have to go to the doctor’s office or hospital. Instead, in the comfort of your home, a system called the  Tricorder will analyze data, diagnose the problem, and send that information to a doctor who, quite possibly, can treat you remotely. In the developed world, where doctors make diagnostic errors 10 percent of the time, this will make a significant difference in quality-of-care and significantly reduce the roughly $55 billion spent annually on the malpractice system) In the developing world, this will make healthcare far more accessible.

 

  for more check out the original at http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevenkotler/2013/12/19/5-medical-technologies-revolutionizing-healthcare/
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Ellie Kesselman Wells's comment, December 21, 2013 9:26 PM
Re Point of Care: in the developed world, machines will make diagnostic errors a lot more often than physicians. And in the developing world, yes, access to care would improve but that doesn't address the other issue, which is paying for required treatment, whether pharmaceutical or otherwise. I'll go complain in the comments for the original post at Forbes, not here, as it isn't your fault! Thank you for sharing with us; I don't intend to seem ungrateful.
Jay Gadani's curator insight, August 6, 2014 11:44 PM

3-D printing is amazing! Just imagine 3-D printing bones with all the nerves...truly amazing 

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What is the most promising medical technology on the horizon today?

What is the most promising medical technology on the horizon today? | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it
Telomere biology has the potential to extend human life span, to dramatically lower rates of the great remaining killer diseases: heart disease, stroke, and Alzheimer’s. All three diseases increas...
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The Modernization of Health Care through Mobile Technology and Medical Monitoring Devices

The Modernization of Health Care through Mobile Technology and Medical Monitoring Devices | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it
On October 22, as part of the Mobile Economy Project, the Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings hosted an event on how specific mobile applications and inventions are transforming health care and the ways regulators and governments are...

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Laureen Turner's curator insight, October 23, 2013 1:05 PM

This is fascinating. King of a dry video but amazing as to what we are doing with mobile technology in health care. 

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Can Google Glass Transform Medical Education? - HIT Consultant

Can Google Glass Transform Medical Education? - HIT Consultant | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it
Can Google Glass Transform Medical Education?

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Mobile Healthcare Technology Making It Easier For Patients and Physicians - WBOY-TV

Mobile Healthcare Technology Making It Easier For Patients and Physicians - WBOY-TV | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it
Mobile Healthcare Technology Making It Easier For Patients and Physicians
WBOY-TV
A Maryland man was taken to United Hospital Center after a motorcycle accident Friday night in Harrison County. It happened at 5:50 p.m.

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ICD-10 and What the Ebola Virus Means for Healthcare Reimbursement

ICD-10 and What the Ebola Virus Means for Healthcare Reimbursement | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it
Public health officials are learning more every day about the procedures required to care for Ebola patients. But one thing that the Ebola crisis has revealed is that the health care system lacks t...
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What is the Impact of ObamaCare on Physician Reimbursement?

What is the Impact of ObamaCare on Physician Reimbursement? | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it
Healthcare in the United States is still being developed around private insurers and public providers. ObamaCare was signed into law to make affordable healthcare services accessible to patients al...
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Is Social Media the Way to Reach the Teenage Patient?

Is Social Media the Way to Reach the Teenage Patient? | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it

In an exam room sits a quiet 15-year-old female, furiously texting on her iPhone, awaiting her annual sports physical. Her mom is patiently sitting in the waiting room to give her daughter some privacy. The doctor steps in, completes the physical, and asks if there is anything the teen wants to talk about. The girl shakes her head “no,” and they say goodbye as she heads back to meet her mom.


 From the outside, this scene might look like a wasted opportunity for the physician to have a confidential discussion about sensitive health topics with her shy patient. But this teen didn’t walk away empty handed. Before the physician walked through the exam room door, the teen had taken a photo of the whiteboard with a link to a blog titled “Am I ready for Sex?” and a Twitter handle to follow–all posted by the physician earlier that day.


Communicating health messages with the teenage population has always been a struggle for adolescent healthcare providers. In my personal experience, attempts to get the majority of teens to engage in conversations about their health during a 15-minute visit quickly leads to deadpan silence. With most providers at least a decade older than their patients, it becomes imperative to adopt communication strategies that are relevant to teens, but many healthcare providers are still resistant to join the digital world. According to recent data,physicians are engaging in social media for personal reasons, but don’t use it professionally.


Read more: http://jhucommunication.wordpress.com/2014/06/20/is-social-media-the-way-to-reach-the-teenage-patient-by-elizabeth-smith/


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Should Doctors and Nurses Check Patients' Social Media?

Should Doctors and Nurses Check Patients' Social Media? | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it

Here’s an interesting ethical question: let’s say a patient is working with a medical team to manage his diabetes. The patient swears he is following the doctor’s dietary recommendations, but his body does not appear to be responding in the way the doctor expects. Later, the nurse assigned to the patient does some social network snooping. She finds one Facebook status update after another indicating that the patient is not, in fact, following the recommended diet at all.

Is what the nurse did ethical? What if the patient had chosen to make his Facebook profile public? What if she was able to use the information she found on Facebook to give the patient better treatment and create a more workable diet plan?

Although there are very few doctors or nurses who are busily snooping into patients’ social media profiles after hours, the question of whether it is appropriate to scan a patient’s social media records is likely to become a significant ethical question in the next three to five years. After all, it’s already become ethically acceptable for potential employers tosearch social media profiles for clues about a job candidate’s personal life and commitment to a career; it’s assumed that in the case of job hunting, all social network information is fair game.

Why not in healthcare as well?

The truth is that you can get a lot of data from social network postings. You can tell when a patient goes to sleep and when that patient wakes up. You can often tell what that patient eats for dinner, how frequently the patient exercises, and how often the patient enjoys activities with friends or family members. Advertising companies use social media to figure out whether a patient is pregnant, even if the patient hasn’t announced the pregnancy; why can’t doctors and nurses do the same?

Right now, one of the biggest roadblocks to searching patients’ social media profiles for medical clues isn’t a lack of interest; it’s a lack of time. It’s no secret that medical professionals work long hours; adding Facebook-sleuthing duties to their workload will take time away from other, more important duties.



However, it’s also very easy to imagine a start-up company who wants to take this responsibility out of doctors’ hands. Imagine signing on with a data aggregator that spits out a slip of paper every time you see a new patient. The paper contains the following details, scraped from social media:

Sleep and wake timesDietary habitsRecorded exerciseRecorded alcohol consumptionSocial outingsStatements describing moodStatements describing physical condition

Wouldn’t that be an amazing tool?

Here are a few problems: first, people often exaggerate their lives on social media, or leave out important details. They take pictures of the chocolate cake they’re eating, but not the steamed broccoli. Likewise, it is incredibly easy to hack social media. Identity theft is rampant these days, underscoring the need for iOS and Android smartphone security on mobile devices. But hacks of mobile Facebook profiles are still extremely common, and a data aggregator won’t be able to tell when a patient’s profile has been hacked.

Lastly, people will probably start censoring their profiles once they know Big Hospital is watching, the same way they make specific social media choices when they’re looking for jobs.

It’s clear that social media holds a lot of potential data that could be helpful to doctors, nurses, and their patients. What isn’t clear is how to use that data effectively or ethically. This is likely to be one of the big questions facing healthcare in the next few years, as social media companies collect more data on individuals and other companies jump in to redistribute and sell that data. Will doctors and nurses take a peek? Only time will tell.



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5 Medical Technologies Revolutionizing Healthcare

5 Medical Technologies Revolutionizing Healthcare | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it

A deeper look at five technologies that are currently advancing exponentially and radically reshaping healthcare. In other words, for the long suffering, there is plenty of hope to go around.


3-D printing 


3D printing is already making its presence felt in medical device world. Ninety-five percent of all hearing aids are today 3D printed. This tech is also pushing into prosthetics. There are custom-made back braces for scoliosis patients and casts for broken bones (perforated with holes so people can finally scratch through their casts) and, in the latest development, 3D printed facial prosthetics (noses, ears, etc.).


Artificial Intelligence

It started with IBM’s Watson. After besting humans on Jeopardy back in 2011, Big Blue sent their thinking machine to medical school. Now loaded up with everything from journal articles to medical textbooks to actual information culled from patient interviews, the supercomputer has remerged as an incredibly robust diagnostic aid that is already being used for everything from training medical students to managing the treatment of lung cancer.


Brain- Computer Interfaces

We’ve been hearing about BCIs for a little while now. The tech originated out of the desire to help paraplegics and quadriplegics control computer cursors with only their brains. Of course, these developments will continue apace, bringing far more liberation to the disabled then ever before possible, but the bigger news is in BCIs that can control robotic limbs or even restore function to paralyzed limbs.


Robotics:


The robots are coming, the robots are coming, the robots are, well, here. Whether we’re talking the da Vinci Surgical System—which has performed over 20,000 operations since its 2000 debut—or newer developments like the nanobots swimming through our bloodstream and scraping plaque from our arteries, robots are already deep into the healthcare space.

Point-of-Care Diagnostics


In medicine, one of the major promises of technology is patient empowerment—especially when it comes to diagnostics. Suddenly, patients no longer have to go to the doctor’s office or hospital. Instead, in the comfort of your home, a system called the  Tricorder will analyze data, diagnose the problem, and send that information to a doctor who, quite possibly, can treat you remotely. In the developed world, where doctors make diagnostic errors 10 percent of the time, this will make a significant difference in quality-of-care and significantly reduce the roughly $55 billion spent annually on the malpractice system) In the developing world, this will make healthcare far more accessible.


for more check out the original at http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevenkotler/2013/12/19/5-medical-technologies-revolutionizing-healthcare/
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Ellie Kesselman Wells's comment, December 21, 2013 9:26 PM
Re Point of Care: in the developed world, machines will make diagnostic errors a lot more often than physicians. And in the developing world, yes, access to care would improve but that doesn't address the other issue, which is paying for required treatment, whether pharmaceutical or otherwise. I'll go complain in the comments for the original post at Forbes, not here, as it isn't your fault! Thank you for sharing with us; I don't intend to seem ungrateful.
Jay Gadani's curator insight, August 6, 2014 11:44 PM

3-D printing is amazing! Just imagine 3-D printing bones with all the nerves...truly amazing 

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Why Mobile Health Technologies Haven't Taken Off (Yet)

Why Mobile Health Technologies Haven't Taken Off (Yet) | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it

Tech entrepreneurs see the mobile health (mHealth) market as the next great business revolution, but it has yet to achieve critical mass.  mHealth is considered the sum of technology-based applications that allow a patient and a physician to clinically interact from different locations.  Examples include the exchange of medical information via e-mail, texting, smartphone apps, storing and forwarding pictures, and Web-based video.

 

The mHealth marketplace is being re-energized by the growth of the smartphone industry, with more than 140 million smartphone users in the U.S.  This number is expected to rise to more than 200 million over the next five years.  This growth is being fueled by thousands of apps that are empowering users in their daily lives.  Consumers are enjoying the handheld convenience of depositing checks, avoiding traffic, playing games, and staying connected to friends.

 

But is the U.S. healthcare infrastructure ready to embrace the growing desire for non-traditional physician-patient encounters?  Unfortunately, the adoption curve has been slow, with only about 10% of the U.S. population (36 million) having ever used mHealth technologies, such as telemedicine.  Regardless of the medium through which the encounter takes place, there are still major hurdles for mHealth to implement solutions that are already prevalent in other service-based industries, such as banking, insurance, and travel.  Despite more than 20,000 healthcare-related smartphone apps that are available in the marketplace today, a 2012 Pew Research Center study found that only 10% of smartphone users have downloaded a healthcare app.  A similar number of users have never received an email or alert directly related to their health. 

 

To gain some insight into the state of mHealth adoption, we contacted Dr. Darren Sommer, Chief Medical Officer of the Optimized Care Network, a network of healthcare providers who virtually connect with and treat patients.  According to Sommer, mHealth apps can be divided into three types of encounters: (1) initiated and concluded by the patient, (2) initiated and concluded by the healthcare provider, and (3) initiated by either, but concluded by the other.

 

The first two represent the ability for either the physician or the patient to utilize technology as a personal resource for their medical needs.  A patient may track his or her diabetes, or a physician may look up the dose of a medication.  In both examples, the patient and the physician are not dependent upon each other.  The third category, which is defined by the patient or physician initiating the app use and the other concluding the interaction, is a much tougher model.  Some pre-coordination must take place before the data being collected can be acted upon.

 

A lack of standardization is not surprising, considering the number of mobile platforms and medical apps providing similar functions.  For example, says Sommer, “If a patient self-selects the use of a diabetes app without coordinating with their physician, the physician may only be able to adjust a patient’s diabetes regimen by reviewing a paper printout brought by the patient to the next in-person visit.  The value of collecting that data in real time is now marginalized.”  It would be better for both the patient and the physician to be able to share that data in real time, review it, and act on it before complications can arise.

 

The logistical hurdles to mHealth adoption also have financial ramifications.  If a primary care doctor manages a population of 2,500 patients, do they have the staff and/or time to integrate and act upon what could be hundreds of daily notifications?  Today’s fragmented, brick-and-mortar healthcare practices were not designed to adjust their workflow like utility grids that foresee and manage the peaks and troughs of power consumption.  A utility company is financially incentivized to deliver energy efficiently, which saves them money and improves their margins.  In healthcare, however, there isn’t a compelling financial case for incentivizing the patient and the physician to invest their own resources into multiple, discrete mHealth solutions.

There are thousands of companies providing telemedicine technology, but there is no widespread adoption by practitioners.  Sommer asks, “Why would a family practitioner that sees 25 patients in the office per day stop seeing five of those patients, in order to see five remotely?  Even if they could get paid for the e-visit, which they likely cannot (at least under current reimbursement models), they would still lose money on their investment in the telemedicine technology.

 

Many independent physician practices do not have the resources to invest in new infrastructure.  Imagine your local independent barbershop investing thousands of dollars into an app that allows its customers to book appointments online, determine the schedule of their favorite barber, and get reminders when a defined period of time expires between haircuts.  The barbershop could never afford to do it unless the investment could be recouped.  This would come in the form of more patrons receiving haircuts.  However, if the shop is operating at maximum capacity, there is little reason to invest additional resources just for the sake of customer convenience.  The case is the same for healthcare.  If a family physician has a practice that is operating at capacity, there is no financial incentive to invest in new services to attract additional patients or risk diminishing its already tight margins.

Despite all these headwinds, it’s likely that healthcare consumers will soon begin to act more like consumers of services from other industries.  They will demand more for their healthcare dollar, because more of that healthcare dollar will come from their wallet and not from their health insurance company.  Innovative providers of healthcare will devise new ways to provide high-quality healthcare at lower costs.  These innovations will eliminate the middleman (government agencies and health insurance companies) and restore the primacy of the patient-physician relationship.  These new clinical services will be more responsive to the needs of patients, more market-driven, and more in line with other service-based industries.  As Dr. Sommer puts it, “Medical practices will compete in the same way that other businesses do or they will not survive.  This, in time, will drive down healthcare costs and improve quality for all.” 


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Technical Dr. Inc.'s curator insight, July 19, 2014 2:28 AM

Contact Details :
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- The Technical Doctor Team

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From Scans, Doctors 3D Print Custom Heart Wraps to Deliver Treatments

From Scans, Doctors 3D Print Custom Heart Wraps to Deliver Treatments | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it

The buzz about 3D printing can at times give the impression that the technology is a panacea that makes all manufacturing cheaper. The truth is 3D printing has one very specific use case: It makes prototypes and custom, one-of-a-kind items cheaper and faster to make.

 

Medicine would seem like a prime beneficiary of this technology, potentially using 3D printing to provide patients with custom-made implants and stents. Yet, to date, medical researchers have focused on the most ambitious goals for the technology, such as replacement organs printed from a patient’s own stem cells, which need years of development before they reach average patients.

 

Recently, a somewhat more modest medical device — and one that could find its way relatively quickly into treatment protocols — was created using 3D printing. Researchers Igor Efimov from Washington University in St. Louis and John Rogers from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign used MRI and CT scans of rabbit and human hearts to 3D-print custom-fitting flexible mesh sacs that fit each heart perfectly and stayed in place as it beat.

 

“Each heart is a different shape, and current devices are one-size-fits-all and don’t at all conform to the geometry of a patient’s heart,” said Efimov.

 

Inside its fabric, the mesh can also hold sensors that monitor for signs of trouble and deliver electrical pulses, if needed. The sensors are embedded in the fabric using technology similar to what Google has said it will use in sugar-monitoring contact lenses, only more nuanced.

 

Doctors can position the sensors or electrodes more precisely using the wrap than by attaching them directly to the heart with sutures or adhesives, Efimov and Rogers state in a recent paper in Nature Communications. They demonstrate in the paper that sensors attached to the mesh (or multifunctional integumentary membrane) accurately measure temperature, mechanical strain and pH, and could deliver pulses of electricity.

 

Depending on the sensors used, the heart wrap could improve treatments for a range of disorders; it could also be used to deliver medication directly to where its needed. But the device was conceptualized specifically to treat ventricle deformities and arrhythmias. The arrhythmia atrial fibrillation affects about 4 million Americans; patients often undergo a surgery that destroys the heart’s own drummer, the atrioventricular node, and subsequently receive a pacemaker.

 more at http://singularityhub.com/2014/03/04/from-scans-doctors-3d-print-custom-heart-wraps-to-deliver-treatments/ ;
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Incorporate patient-generated health data into the EMR

Incorporate patient-generated health data into the EMR | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it

Though the industry has made outstanding progress in adopting EMRs, the practice of data acquisition from patients remains cloudy.


A recommendation from the HITSC Meaningful Use Workgroup would require practices with electronic health records (EHRs) to allow 10 percent of patients to report PGHD electronically.


If approved in meaningful use stage 3, the final stage of HealthIT.gov’s EHR incentive program, it could push hospitals to incorporate patient-generated data.


This requirement may seem like a relatively simple intervention, but the ramifications are quite significant. If clinical decision-making is made on the basis of data supplied by patients and documented in the EMR, how can clinicians be sure that such data is complete, correct and valid? And will clinicians like me learn to rely on it, or will we disregard it due to concerns about its validity or barriers to integrating it into care flow?


Furthermore, if a patient is in control of her health data entry, who is ultimately responsible for its completeness and accuracy — the patient or the clinician?


Incorporating biometric data into the EMR, an exciting prospect, is even more complex. Though clinicians are quite familiar with data entry from FDA-approved medical devices such as blood glucose meters, pacemakers and pulmonary function units, data from a myriad of consumer-driven health devices (Fitbit and others) will soon seek to flex their way into EMRs.


Patients clearly value these data; a recent Pew Research report noted that 60 percent of adults claim to track their exercise routine, weight or diet, meaning providers have some catch-up to do in order to meet patients halfway. Some health systems, such as Partners HealthCare, have already been experimenting with the incorporation of PGHD from remote devices into the EMR, and other institutions should follow.


Consumer health data devices are moving ahead at a staggering pace, and while the health care system can’t quite keep up, strategic planning should be happening now.


Despite the challenges, incorporating PGHD is a necessary evolutionary step for health care. Intelligently designed, well-executed systems that fully incorporate and display PGHD in a meaningful way will improve shared decision-making and enable patients as active care partners. Keen clinicians and patients will stay closely tuned to the numerous transformations to come.

more at http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2014/03/incorporate-patientgenerated-health-data-emr.html
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Laurie Bolick Wolf's curator insight, June 17, 2015 2:31 PM

A review of the use of patient generated health data and its implications on healthcare in the future.  Having patient's enter their health history into the EMR prior to arrival is a time saving step that may allow the provider to spend more time with the patient for diagnosis and education.  However, this means that an accurate review of what the patient has entered must also be done.  If the provider is not entering the information his/herself, there is too much opportunity for something to be missed or entered incorrectly.  In regards to the potential for future collaboration between patient worn devices and EMR, I am not sure how helpful this is.  While it is nice for the provider to see that you have been getting exercise, it really does not make any change in the plan of care. 

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Google Glass Medical Pioneers Balance Technology and Marketing

Some early adopters in the surgical suite are pushing ahead with efforts to capitalize on the promise of Google’s revolutionary hands-free tool.

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Is Technology Making Us Healthier Or More Sick? - Medical News Today

Is Technology Making Us Healthier Or More Sick? - Medical News Today | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it
Is Technology Making Us Healthier Or More Sick?
Medical News Today
Is technology actually good for us?

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Social Media for Medical Technology Companies

Companies can leverage social media to drive business and compete effectively in the new era of health care. But what do you need to know before jumping in o...

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Mayo Clinic iPad App Utilizing FitBit Technology - Healthcare Technology Online (press release)

Mayo Clinic iPad App Utilizing FitBit Technology - Healthcare Technology Online (press release) | Healthcare Technology and Miscellaneous Healthcare Issues | Scoop.it
Mayo Clinic iPad App Utilizing FitBit Technology Healthcare Technology Online (press release) Consumer eHealth Engagement reports, “A team of clinicians at Mayo Clinic designed an iPad app to help cardiac surgery patients and their families...

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Marcia Marinho's curator insight, February 6, 2014 4:03 PM

The Mayo Clinic has joined its MyCare App with FitBit technology for part of its pilot program for cardiac patients.