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AMES device helps the paralyzed regain movement

AMES device helps the paralyzed regain movement | Medical Research & Technology | Scoop.it

Last week, the US Food and Drug Administration granted clearance to a new device that could be of considerable aid to stroke victims or people with partial spinal cord injuries. Created by Dr. Paul Cordo of the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) in collaboration with OHSU spinoff company AMES, the "AMES device" reportedly helps the brain get paralyzed muscles moving again.

 

 


Via Ray and Terry's
Kate Drake's insight:

I think it's wonderful that we're coming up with inventive new ways to help people 'get back to normal'. But stop and consider, perhaps, the validity of a 2,000 year old medicine practice that could provide similar if not better results....at a much lesser cost.

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Vaccine Alum Adjuvant Path to Brain Documented: Study

Vaccine Alum Adjuvant Path to Brain Documented: Study | Medical Research & Technology | Scoop.it

Newly published research by Keele Conference scientists shows that aluminum adjuvant in vaccines transfers to the brain. They have documented the path from injection site to the brain, and that once in the brain, it persists. Newborns, the elderly, and people with a certain genetic variation are particularly at risk.

 

The use of nanomaterials in humans is not as contemporary as is recently portrayed. For decades, alum, a nanocrystalline compound formed of aluminum oxyhydroxide, has been the most commonly used adjuvant in vaccines.


Via Sepp Hasslberger
Kate Drake's insight:
 I agree with Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

"Aluminium adjuvants in vaccines migrate to the brain and they persist there, wreaking destruction.

 

And here we are with vaccines being recommended particularly to the most vulnerable population groups - infants whose brain is developing, and elderly people who are at risk of Alzheimer's and similar degenerative conditions linked to aluminium.

 

Modern medicine!

 

Also relevant in this connection:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JKfbkeQyw84

Vaccine Safety Conference - Dr. Christopher Exley on the systemic toxicity of aluminium adjuvants."  How can the FDA and government bodies rugulate that vaccines with this element in it, is safe for it's people?! It's a true tragety. 
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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, July 13, 2013 8:41 AM

Aluminium adjuvants in vaccines migrate to the brain and they persist there, wreaking destruction.

 

And here we are with vaccines being recommended particularly to the most vulnerable population groups - infants whose brain is developing, and elderly people who are at risk of Alzheimer's and similar degenerative conditions linked to aluminium.

 

Modern medicine!

 

Also relevant in this connection:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JKfbkeQyw84

Vaccine Safety Conference - Dr. Christopher Exley on the systemic toxicity of aluminium adjuvants.

 

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Real-Life True Blood: Synthetic Blood Is Coming — And So Are a Host of Potential Complications | Underwire | Wired.com

Real-Life True Blood: Synthetic Blood Is Coming — And So Are a Host of Potential Complications | Underwire | Wired.com | Medical Research & Technology | Scoop.it
The arrival of real synthetic blood is also likely to bring with it its own set of serious socioeconomic issues, including ones that have complicated many medical advances that before it.
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Experimental procedure shows promise for treatment of MS

Experimental procedure shows promise for treatment of MS | Medical Research & Technology | Scoop.it

An international team of scientists has recently reported success in the first phase of clinical trials in which MS victims’ immune systems were conditioned to become much more tolerant of myelin.\

 

In the study, white blood cells were obtained from nine MS-afflicted test subjects. These cells were specially processed, coupled with myelin antigens, and then injected intravenously back into their respective donors – up to 3 billion of these dead, treated cells were injected into each person.

 

When they entered the spleen, which filters dead cells from the bloodstream, both the white blood cells themselves and their myelin antigen payloads were identified by the body as being innocuous. This caused the immune system to become 50 to 75 percent less reactive to myelin, depending on the person and the number of cells injected.

 

 


Via Ray and Terry's
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The Avatar Will See You Now | MIT Technology Review

The Avatar Will See You Now | MIT Technology Review | Medical Research & Technology | Scoop.it
Medical centers are testing new, friendly ways to reduce the need for office visits by extending their reach into patients’ homes.

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Most patients who enter the gym of the San Mateo Medical Center in California are there to work with physical therapists. But a few who had knee replacements are being coached by a digital avatar instead.

The avatar, Molly, interviews them in Spanish or English about the levels of pain they feel as a video guides them through exercises, while the 3-D cameras of a Kinect device measure their movements. Because it’s a pilot project, Paul Carlisle, the director of rehabilitation services, looks on. But the ultimate goal is for the routine to be done from a patient’s home.


“It would change our whole model,” says Carlisle, who is running the trial as the public hospital looks for creative ways to extend the reach of its overtaxed budget and staff. “We don’t want to replace therapists. But in some ways, it does replace the need to have them there all the time.”

Receiving remote medical care is becoming more common as technologies improve and health records get digitized. Sense.ly, the California startup running the trial, is one of more than 500 companies using health-care tools from Nuance, a company that develops speech-recognition and virtual-assistant software. “Our goal is basically to capture the patient’s state of mind and body,” says Ivana Schnur, cofounder of Sense.ly and a clinical psychologist who has spent years developing virtual-reality tools in medicine and mental health.


Via Wildcat2030
Kate Drake's insight:

There's something about an avatar doctor that seems like a bad idea. I think the technology could be used for something very useful and productive in the medical field, but limiting to an even further extent the face time between patient and doctor is not sound medical treatment. 

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luiy's curator insight, June 15, 2013 9:34 AM

The Sense.ly software, currently in beta, is also being tested at an addiction and detox clinic in California, doing patient intake and assessment in a crowded waiting room. Schnur hopes the system will eventually be used for even more complex tasks. The company, a product of the French telecommunication company Orange’s Silicon Valley incubator program, is working to include additional features, such as the ability to interpret and respond to a patient’s facial expressions.

 

Of course, doctors see some risks in such approaches, especially if the software makes an error or misinterprets an interaction. Kanter points out that although electronic systems often reduce errors, any errors that occur can propagate more quickly than those made only on paper.

Carlisle, who will enroll 50 to 60 patients by the time the study is done, is looking forward to getting more data. Over time, he hopes, not only will he improve the care of individual patients in their home environments, but what he learns from the data will improve therapy for everyone.

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Growing Left, Growing Right – How a Body Breaks Symmetry

Growing Left, Growing Right – How a Body Breaks Symmetry | Medical Research & Technology | Scoop.it
Our bodies start out symmetrical, but then things start moving. How this happens (and how it can go wrong) is a rich field of study.
Kate Drake's insight:

Cilia and fluid flow makes all the difference. Your insides would  be mirrored in reverese otherwise. Crazy, but true. 

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Surgeons develop app to practice surgery

Surgeons develop app to practice surgery | Medical Research & Technology | Scoop.it

Trainee surgeons are using tablet computers as a way to practice surgery outside the operating theatre.

The surgery app was designed by four surgeons in London and can be downloaded on a variety of devices.

Dr Sanjay Purkayastha, one of its developers said they wanted to take surgical education to "another level".

The app has been downloaded worldwide more than 80,000 times in less than six months.


Via Alex Butler
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FPOV's curator insight, June 17, 2013 12:22 PM

Taking surgical education to another level ...

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When Trick Questions Become False Memories : Neuroskeptic

When Trick Questions Become False Memories : Neuroskeptic | Medical Research & Technology | Scoop.it

Simply asking people whether they experienced an event can trick them into later believing that it did occur, according to a neat little study just out: Susceptibility to long-term misinformation effect outside of the laboratory

Psychologists Miriam Lommen and colleagues studied 249 Dutch soldiers were deployed for a four month tour of duty in Afghanistan. As part of a study into PTSD, they were given an interview at the end of the deployment asking them about their exposure to various stressful events that had occurred. However, one of the things discussed was made up – a missile attack on their base on New Year’s Eve.

 

At the post-test, participants were provided new information about an event that did not take place during their deployment, that is, a (harmless) missile attack at the base on New Year’s Eve.

We provided a short description of the event including some sensory details (e.g., sound of explosion, sight of gravel after the explosion). After that, participants were asked if they had experienced it…

Eight of the soldiers reported remembering this event right there in the interview. The other 241 correctly said they didn’t recall it, but seven months later, when they did a follow-up questionnaire about their experiences in the field, 26% said they did remember the non-existent New Year’s Eve bombardment (this question had been added to an existing PTSD scale.)

Susceptibility to the misinformation was correlated with having a lower IQ, and with PTSD symptom severity.

False memory effects like this one have been widely studied, but generally only in laboratory conditions. I like this study because it used a clever design to take memory misinformation into the real world, by neatly piggybacking onto another piece of research.

Also, it’s interesting (and worrying) that the false information was presented in the context of a question, not a statement. It seems that merely being asked about something can, in some cases, lead to memories of having experienced that thing.


Via Wildcat2030
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3D-printed Robohands help kids without fingers

3D-printed Robohands help kids without fingers | Medical Research & Technology | Scoop.it

Carpenter Richard van As made his own digits after losing his fingers in an accident. Now he's helping kids by 3D-printing prosthetics and running an Indiegogo campaign.


Via ehealthgr
Kate Drake's insight:

A kickstarter program I would fund. 

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Biofuel cell tattoo turns perspiration to power generation | Chemistry World

Biofuel cell tattoo turns perspiration to power generation | Chemistry World | Medical Research & Technology | Scoop.it
Device produces electricity from lactate and could run sensors to monitor patients' health
Kate Drake's insight:

Pretty amazing stuff I'd love to read more about this! Better yet, anyone know a person at OHSU working on something similar? 

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Sensors and smartphones bring the baby monitor into 2013

Sensors and smartphones bring the baby monitor into 2013 | Medical Research & Technology | Scoop.it
A new baby monitor system uses sensors, Bluetooth technology and a mobile app to let parents monitor their newborn and ease anxiety around sudden infant death.
Kate Drake's insight:

I don't like the idea of a wi-fi device being strapped to my baby 24-7, just does not seem like a good idea. Studies are now showing that wi-fi, in close proximity to our bodies is harmful to our health. 

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A 3-D printout for your health

A 3-D printout for your health | Medical Research & Technology | Scoop.it
The field of 3-D printing technology is revolutionizing industries across the spectrum, from the arts to electronics.

Via Alex Butler
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Kate Drake's curator insight, June 10, 2013 1:32 PM

How could we use this in the field of Oriental Medicine? 

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Healthiest Cities in America

Healthiest Cities in America | Medical Research & Technology | Scoop.it

NerdWallet sifted through the fifty largest metro areas to find the ones with the best indicators of health, including health scores for the residents, health insurance coverage and a high prevalence of doctors and clean air.  NerdWallet assessed the health score according to the following factors:

How fit are the residents?  We assessed fitness of residents through the American Fitness Index, a composite index that includes the CDC’s Selected Metropolitan/Micropolitan Area Risk Trends Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, environmental factors from the Trust for Public Lands, rates of disease and other government data.Is healthcare accessible?  We incorporated the percentage of residents who have health insurance as well as the number of physicians per 100,000 residents.Is the air quality good?  Research shows that cleaner air adds an average of 4 months to a resident’s life expectancy.  We included the number of high particle pollution days per year for each metro area.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
Kate Drake's insight:

This is not a study - you can not compare apples and oranges. 

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Seth Bilazarian, MD's curator insight, May 22, 2013 12:25 PM

Boston is number one in this survey.  The assessment mixes healthiest city parameters like fitness and pollution with most available and accessible medical care.  Different things, both important.  The survey is a little stacked toward cities with multiple medical schools and therefore multiple training programs and therefore multiple doctors.

Ellen Diane's comment, June 26, 2013 7:32 AM
GO Boston
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AMES device helps the paralyzed regain movement

AMES device helps the paralyzed regain movement | Medical Research & Technology | Scoop.it

Last week, the US Food and Drug Administration granted clearance to a new device that could be of considerable aid to stroke victims or people with partial spinal cord injuries. Created by Dr. Paul Cordo of the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) in collaboration with OHSU spinoff company AMES, the "AMES device" reportedly helps the brain get paralyzed muscles moving again.

 

 


Via Ray and Terry's
Kate Drake's insight:

I think it's wonderful that we're coming up with inventive new ways to help people 'get back to normal'. But stop and consider, perhaps, the validity of a 2,000 year old medicine practice that could provide similar if not better results....at a much lesser cost.

more...
No comment yet.