Medical Marketing
Follow
2 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by MindStream Creative
Scoop.it!

Advancements in Prostate Cancer Treatment: HIFU | Tracy Gapin | LinkedIn

Advancements in Prostate Cancer Treatment: HIFU | Tracy Gapin | LinkedIn | Medical Marketing | Scoop.it

Like other cancers, it is very important to find prostate cancer during its early stages when curative rates are highest. Thankfully, prostate cancer treatment advancements have allowed patients to undergo less invasive therapies with fewer negative side effects.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MindStream Creative
Scoop.it!

Where the Small Practice is Failing HIPAA Compliance

Where the Small Practice is Failing HIPAA Compliance | Medical Marketing | Scoop.it
The next round of HIPAA audits is set to begin and organizations must be prepared or risk a HIPAA violation. Learn the mistakes many organizations make and
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MindStream Creative from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

How to Avoid Hiccups with HIPPA on Social Media

How to Avoid Hiccups with HIPPA on Social Media | Medical Marketing | Scoop.it

The world of HIPAA violations as they pertain to social media is pretty murky. Over the years, we’ve seen multiple instances of medical personnel being slammed with heavy fines, as well as suffering other harsh penalties.

It’s important to remember that while social media is an incredibly valuable tool for marketing and promotion, it can be a double-edged sword when resulting in potential HIPAA violations.

Discussing Information About a Patient

Even in an instance where an individual’s name isn’t used, it’s still best to err on the side of caution and avoid discussing a patient online. The reason being is that even in an instance of innocent discussion regarding a patient, it’s all-too-easy to connect the digital breadcrumbs of where an office is, what patients are fans of that office on Facebook and who has recently checked-in at that office.

Having followers for your office on Twitter is great, but openly discussing a patient’s medical history isn’t a great idea. In the past, nursing personnel were fired from their jobs as a result of chatting about a patient via social media, in what was deemed a clear violation of HIPAA protocol.

Do I Post That Selfie or Not?

Taking pictures in the office isn’t a terrible idea, however, you should make sure that no relevant patient information is visible in the photo. Even something as slight as capturing a patient’s file in a door in the office hallway is a potential HIPAA violation issue, so, best to tread lightly when posting photos to social media.

What's the Best Course of Action?

Personal social media accounts are best kept under a nickname or pseudonym, as doctors’ names are publicly-shared information. A clear separation between a professional and personal social media account is also important.

Marking personal social media accounts as private so they can’t be discovered by patients is a good way to avoid this type of conflict.

 


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MindStream Creative
Scoop.it!

Are Online Coupon Sites Smart for Your Medical Practice?

Are Online Coupon Sites Smart for Your Medical Practice? | Medical Marketing | Scoop.it
Online coupon sites such as Groupon and Living Social may be an attractive marketing solution, but there are some important considerations to make before getting started.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MindStream Creative from Lean Six Sigma Group
Scoop.it!

Transforming the patient experience at Moffitt Cancer Center | Process Excellence Network

Transforming the patient experience at Moffitt Cancer Center | Process Excellence Network | Medical Marketing | Scoop.it
Transforming the patient experience at Moffitt Cancer Center | Process Excellence Network - (Interesting: Transforming the patient experience at Moffitt Cancer Center http://t.co/mIs6rt2MA2)...

Via Steven Bonacorsi
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MindStream Creative from Epic Healthcare marketing
Scoop.it!

Healthcare Marketing: 6 Common Healthcare Marketing Terms You Should Understand

Healthcare Marketing: 6 Common Healthcare Marketing Terms You Should Understand | Medical Marketing | Scoop.it
Articles shares 6 Common Healthcare Marketing Terms You Should Understand

Via jeff hanson
more...
jeff hanson's curator insight, February 21, 2013 4:02 PM

Good story.  Good site.  Shows how it's important to tie current marketing trends to industry specific client.

Scooped by MindStream Creative
Scoop.it!

Why You Aren’t Targeting the Right Market | MindStream Creative. Medical and Plastic Surgery Internet Marketing | 1-888-324-5559

Why You Aren’t Targeting the Right Market | MindStream Creative. Medical and Plastic Surgery Internet Marketing | 1-888-324-5559 | Medical Marketing | Scoop.it
Women are dominating the purchases made in the U.S., including healthcare. In order for a medical practice to be competitive, it must change its thinking and target women in their marketing efforts.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MindStream Creative from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Healthcare Social Media: Why It’s #WorthIt

Healthcare Social Media: Why It’s #WorthIt | Medical Marketing | Scoop.it

When you’re in healthcare, a day at the office can mean a lot of things – some of which involve bodily fluids and a whole lot of sterile gauze. At no point would most of us stop and say, “Wow, I better tweet about this!”

At first, it doesn’t seem like healthcare and social media go hand-in-hand.

Often, social media may seem like a fun diversion, but should you really make the time for a tweet when there are so many other things to do? Besides, is blogging about your new patient intake system really going to attract any new patients?

 

True, the relationship between your Facebook likes and your client roster is not a one-to-one correlation. And we all know that marketing can only get you so far without high-quality patient care.

But an earnest social media presence is still worth your time.

Here are a couple of reasons you should dust off your old Twitter account, blog, or Facebook profile…

Social Media Creates Relationships

They call it “social” media for a reason. The idea behind all this virtual communication is to talk with real people. It’s about connecting with people in a casual, organic way.

Whether or not you’re engaging in direct conversation, you’re slowly building relationships. Your potential clients are gradually getting to know you and your facility — your unique culture, and your goals — all before they even walk through your doors.

Even when it comes time for something as simple as your annual teeth cleaning, wouldn’t you rather go to provider you feel like you’ve already met, instead of a total stranger?

You Can Be a Resource

We all went into healthcare because we wanted to help people. Sharing useful information via social media is just another way to do that.

Of course, many still worry about the potential legal complications of giving health advice over the internet. But you don’t have to get all WebMD in your Twitter account to be a resource. The LiveLight Clinic shares healthy lifestyle tips and smoothie recipes. Likewise, a family dental clinic could blog about healthy, sugar-free picnic foods for summer.

Whether they’re in your facility or not, you can help patients (and potential patients) by sharing information about health-related topics.

Extend Your Sphere of Influence

Did you know Baylor Health has been serving patients for more than a century? They also offer financial assistance to patients so that money need not be a barrier to getting quality care.

And, by the way, these folks are in Texas and I’m halfway across the country in Indiana. I’ve never seen any of their ads, so how do I know about them at all?

Google.

I wanted some healthy tailgating recipes, and that’s when I found Baylor Health’s fantastic Pinterest board. While I was there, I saw so much useful content that I kept browsing.

I would never have found out about Baylor Health if they hadn’t had such an engaging web presence. But they’re definitely on my radar — and now, they’re on yours, too.

No Marketing Budget? No Problem!

There’s a saying in the healthcare field: “There are only so many ways to draw blood.” Normally, it’s used as a way of simplifying things. And while there may only be so many ways to draw blood, there are a thousand ways to get the word out about your organization — without spending a dime.

That’s where social media comes in.

One of the first social media success stories is that of Gary Vaynerchuk, who used YouTube to promote his father’s small wine store. Soon people were coming in and buying bottles of wine priced as high as $10,000 (each!). Surely, Vaynerchuk would be able to quantify the exact relationship between time invested on social media and company profits.

But when asked directly, he simply replied, “What’s the ROI [return on investment] of your mother?”

There’s rarely a round of budget cuts when marketing isn’t on the chopping block. The unfortunate part is that even if budgets are cut, expected outcomes often remain the same. Social media is a great tool to have in your repertoire, regardless of the size of your budget.

Social media isn’t guaranteed to help fill up your waiting room, it’s true. But the connection between your social media presence and your total patient experience shouldn’t be ignored, even if it’s not easy to quantify.

 


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MindStream Creative from Healthcare and Technology news
Scoop.it!

Get that Hospital Trending - How to Make an Impact on Social Media -

Get that Hospital Trending - How to Make an Impact on Social Media - | Medical Marketing | Scoop.it

Is it going to be Twitter or Facebook? How about Pinterest or Instagram? Clearly, social media must continue to play a role in the current consumer-driven healthcare arena, but how do marketers manage this growing field? With over a billion active users on Facebook alone, according to The Guardian, effective leverage becomes a necessity.

The goal for most businesses today goes beyond just staying active in social media. Most want to get something trending, because it garners attention for the brand. For hospitals, that means making an impact both in the community and in the industry.

Deliver Incentives
Perhaps the analogy is a little overused, but people jump at carrots. What they don’t do is give the local hospital priority on their social media pages. Hospitals looking to add users can benefit from dangling the preverbal carrot. Create incentives that get patients liking the hospital’s pages such as a drawing for gift cards for everyone who shares a post. Marketers might start a hashtag campaign and enter everyone who posts using the hashtags.

Make It Easy
Patients can’t follow a page they don’t know exists, so make it easy to find. Put links to all your social media sites on blogs, web pages and in email signatures. Put address information on print material like brochures and business cards. It should be a permanent part of invoice and stationary letterheads, as well. Increase awareness through brick and mortar locations just as much as through digital channels. Adding “Follow Us on Facebook” to printed marketing materials, front desk signage, ER waiting rooms will increase your social media channels exposure. It’s not unheard of for people waiting to see a doctor to be on their phone and scrolling through their social media accounts. When they see your hospital is on Facebook,Twitter etc…chances are they will follow/like your social media pages. Make a commitment and follow through on your social strategies as part of your branding efforts.

Get Others Involved
Ask your staff and any healthcare professional associated with the hospital to follow the social media pages. If each staff member has at least 100 “friends,” then every post will be seen, and potentially liked, by thousands of people.

Stay Current
Don’t just post marketing tidbits about the hospital on social media sites. Make the page trend by creating discussions about things that matter to the readers. Post about healthcare news, provide tips on things like weight loss and stay current on community news. Scott & White Health Care provided social media updates when they were treating victims of the Ft. Hood shooting.

Make It Personal
Mayo Clinic is a stellar example of this in action. They have their own social media network that sponsors health promotion campaigns, including one specifically about heart health. Their doctors post regularly on their pages about trending health topics, too. Nebraska Medical Center provides QR codes, so patients can watch videos to get to know their physicians.

Provide Good Customer Service
Social media can offer assistance in this area, as well. Invite community members to provide feedback about the hospital via a Facebook page. This shows the followers that you care about what people think and, also, localizes the complaints. An unhappy consumer is going to go online and vent. This opens up a line of communication, so you can deal with the problem before it becomes a fire.

For hospitals, social media is a tool that can make or break the brand. Use it wisely to ignite your hospital marketing and get the hospital trending.

 

 


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
more...
Rescooped by MindStream Creative from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

Incorporate patient-generated health data into the EMR

Incorporate patient-generated health data into the EMR | Medical Marketing | Scoop.it

Though the industry has made outstanding progress in adopting EMRs, the practice of data acquisition from patients remains cloudy.

 

A recommendation from the HITSC Meaningful Use Workgroup would require practices with electronic health records (EHRs) to allow 10 percent of patients to report PGHD electronically.

 

If approved in meaningful use stage 3, the final stage of HealthIT.gov’s EHR incentive program, it could push hospitals to incorporate patient-generated data.

 

This requirement may seem like a relatively simple intervention, but the ramifications are quite significant. If clinical decision-making is made on the basis of data supplied by patients and documented in the EMR, how can clinicians be sure that such data is complete, correct and valid? And will clinicians like me learn to rely on it, or will we disregard it due to concerns about its validity or barriers to integrating it into care flow?

 

Furthermore, if a patient is in control of her health data entry, who is ultimately responsible for its completeness and accuracy — the patient or the clinician?

 

Incorporating biometric data into the EMR, an exciting prospect, is even more complex. Though clinicians are quite familiar with data entry from FDA-approved medical devices such as blood glucose meters, pacemakers and pulmonary function units, data from a myriad of consumer-driven health devices (Fitbit and others) will soon seek to flex their way into EMRs.

 

Patients clearly value these data; a recent Pew Research report noted that 60 percent of adults claim to track their exercise routine, weight or diet, meaning providers have some catch-up to do in order to meet patients halfway. Some health systems, such as Partners HealthCare, have already been experimenting with the incorporation of PGHD from remote devices into the EMR, and other institutions should follow.

 

Consumer health data devices are moving ahead at a staggering pace, and while the health care system can’t quite keep up, strategic planning should be happening now.

 

Despite the challenges, incorporating PGHD is a necessary evolutionary step for health care. Intelligently designed, well-executed systems that fully incorporate and display PGHD in a meaningful way will improve shared decision-making and enable patients as active care partners. Keen clinicians and patients will stay closely tuned to the numerous transformations to come.

 more at http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2014/03/incorporate-patientgenerated-health-data-emr.html ;
Via nrip
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MindStream Creative
Scoop.it!

Doctors: The Relationship You Have with Patients is Vital to Their Health

Doctors: The Relationship You Have with Patients is Vital to Their Health | Medical Marketing | Scoop.it
The relationship a provider has with its patients not only means the difference between success and failure, it also has a direct connection to the patients health.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MindStream Creative
Scoop.it!

The Cure for Negative Patient Reviews is…

The Cure for Negative Patient Reviews is… | Medical Marketing | Scoop.it
The internet is a primary tool for patients looking for new healthcare providers. Negative patient reviews can make it difficult for a practice to thrive. There is however, a solution for addressing negative reviews.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MindStream Creative from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

5 Secrets of Marketing to Women

5 Secrets of Marketing to Women | Medical Marketing | Scoop.it
The demand is growing for women-friendly devices and tech solutions. How can tech companies get better at marketing to women?

Via Thomas Faltin
more...
No comment yet.