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21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources
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FindZebra - The search engine for difficult medical cases

FindZebra - The search engine for difficult medical cases | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it

FindZebra is a specialised search engine supporting medical professionals in diagnosing difficult patient cases.


Rare diseases are especially difficult to diagnose and this online medical search engines comes in support of medical personnel looking for diagnostic hypotheses.


With a simple and consistent interface across all devices, it can be easily used as an aid tool at the time and place where medical decisions are made. The retrieved information is collected from reputable sources across the internet storing public medical articles on rare and genetic diseases.

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Excellent medical educational resources.

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Innovation in Education and Medicine

Innovation in Education and Medicine | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it

"Education research is as likely as medical research to lead to profound breakthroughs in practice and outcomes in the coming years." That is the conclusion of the latest blog post from Robert Slavin, director of the Center for Research and Reform in Education, in which he discusses similarities and differences in the way evidence affects, or could affect, education and medicine. 


Advocates of evidence-based reform in education can't help citing evidence-driven progress in medicine as an analogue to justify evidence-driven progress in their own field. Yet opponents bring up numerous differences between the two disciplines in order to make the analogy seem misleading. In today's blog, I'll address some similarities and differences in the way evidence affects, or could affect, education and medicine, leading up to a provocative conclusion:

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Problem-based and evidence-based modified and integrated will bring," Education research is as likely as medical research to lead to profound breakthroughs in practice and outcomes in the coming years."

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Slideshow: Nasal Irrigation: Relief for Colds & Allergy Symptoms

Slideshow: Nasal Irrigation: Relief for Colds & Allergy Symptoms | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it
Clogged sinuses and congestion bothering you? Nasal irrigation can relieve sinus symptoms associated with colds & allergies. Learn how to do nasal irrigation with this visual guide.
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Excellent medical education slide show.

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Cognition Before Curriculum: Rethinking the Integra... [Acad Med. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

Cognition Before Curriculum: Rethinking the Integra... [Acad Med. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it

Integrating basic science and clinical concepts in the undergraduate medical curriculum is an important challenge for medical education. The health professions education literature includes a variety of educational strategies for integrating basic science and clinical concepts at multiple levels of the curriculum. To date, assessment of this literature has been limited.

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Research review of integrating basic science and clinical concepts in the undergraduate medical curriculum.

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Just Imagine: New Paradigms for Medical Education. [Acad Med. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

Just Imagine: New Paradigms for Medical Education. [Acad Med. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it

For all its traditional successes, the current model of medical education in the United States and Canada is being challenged on issues of quality, throughput, and cost, a process that has exposed numerous shortcomings in its efforts to meet the needs of the nations' health care systems. A radical change in direction is required because the current path will not lead to a solution.

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Interesting constructurist perceptive.

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The Active Implementation Hub

The Active Implementation Hub | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it

“The Active Implementation Hub is a free, online learning environment for use by any stakeholder  involved in active implementation and scaling up of programs and innovations. The site goal is to increase the knowledge and improve the performance of persons engaged in actively implementing any program or practice.”

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The AI Hub is developed and maintained by the State Implementation and Scaling-up of Evidence-based Practices Center (SISEP) 

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Imagine... John Lennon

Imagine... John Lennon | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it
Click to see the pic and write a comment...
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Imagine infographic...and the world will be as one.

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Teaching Writing and Learning With Graphic Organizers

Teaching Writing and Learning With Graphic Organizers | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it
There are dozens of great brainstorming and organizing tools available on the web to help students prepare for writing assignments and develop their
Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s insight:

Excellent resources for visual learners in STEM-based learning. Actually all learners will benefit with these tools provided.

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First American Surgery Transmitted Live Via Google Glass

First American Surgery Transmitted Live Via Google Glass | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it

A surgeon at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center is the first in the United States to consult with a distant colleague using live, point-of-view video from the operating room via Google Glass, a head-mounted computer and camera device.

 

“It’s a privilege to be a part of this project as we explore how this exciting new technology might be incorporated into the everyday care of our patients,” said Dr. Christopher Kaeding, the physician who performed the surgery and director of sports medicine at Ohio State.  “To be honest, once we got into the surgery, I often forgot the device was there. It just seemed very intuitive and fit seamlessly.”

 

Google Glass has a frame similar to traditional glasses, but instead of lenses, there is a small glass block that sits above the right eye.  On that glass is a computer screen that, with a simple voice command, allows users to pull up information as they would on any other computer.  Attached to the front of the device is a camera that offers a point-of-view image and the ability to take both photos and videos while the device is worn.

 

During this procedure at the medical center’s University East facility, Kaeding wore the device as he performed ACL surgery on Paula Kobalka, 47, from Westerville, Ohio, who hurt her knee playing softball.  As he performed her operation at a facility on the east side of Columbus, Google Glass showed his vantage point via the internet to audiences miles away.

 

Across town, one of Kaeding’s Ohio State colleagues, Dr. Robert Magnussen, watched the surgery his office, while on the main campus, several students at The Ohio State University College of Medicine watched on their laptops.

 

“To have the opportunity to be a medical student and share in this technology is really exciting,” said Ryan Blackwell, a second-year medical student who watched the surgery remotely.   “This could have huge implications, not only from the medical education perspective, but because a doctor can use this technology remotely, it could spread patient care all over the world in places that we don’t have it already.”

 

“As an academic medical center, we’re very excited about the opportunities this device could provide for education,” said Dr. Clay Marsh, chief innovation officer at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. “But beyond, that, it could be a game-changer for the doctor during the surgery itself.”

 

Experts have theorized that during surgery doctors could use voice commands to instantly call up x-ray or MRI images of their patient, pathology reports or reference materials.  They could collaborate live and face-to-face with colleagues via the internet, anywhere in the world.

 

“It puts you right there, real time,” said Marsh, who is also the executive director of the Center for Personalized Health Care at Ohio State. “Not only might you be able to call up any kind of information you need or to get the help you need, but it’s the ability to do it immediately that’s so exciting,” he said.  “Now, we just have to start using it. Like many technologies, it needs to be evaluated in different situations to find out where the greatest value is and how it can impact the lives of our patients in a positive way.”

 

Only 1,000 people in the United States have been chosen to test Google Glass as part of Google’s Explorer Program. Dr. Ismail Nabeel, an assistant professor of general internal medicine at Ohio State applied and was chosen. He then partnered with Kaeding to perform this groundbreaking surgery and to help test technology that could change the way we see medicine in the future.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Outstanding news!

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Zane's curator insight, September 3, 2013 8:44 PM

This one is absolutely amazing! 

Dane MillerHass's comment, September 5, 2013 6:26 PM
Super cool, we are developing great things!
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Patients With Limited English Proficiency: Are Residents Prepared to Use Medical Interpreters?

Patients With Limited English Proficiency: Are Residents Prepared to Use Medical Interpreters? | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it
Purpose: To evaluate whether educational sessions on interpreter use and experience with interpreters are associated with resident self-efficacy in the use of professional interpreters.
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Interesting findings...

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Cognition Before Curriculum: Rethinking the Integration of Basic Science and Clinical Learning

Cognition Before Curriculum: Rethinking the Integration of Basic Science and Clinical Learning | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it

Purpose: Integrating basic science and clinical concepts in the undergraduate medical curriculum is an important challenge for medical education. The health professions education literature includes a variety of educational strategies for integrating basic science and clinical concepts at multiple levels of the curriculum. To date, assessment of this literature has been limited.

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Florida issues warning about rare, brain-eating amoeba

Florida issues warning about rare, brain-eating amoeba | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it
The Florida Department of Health issues a warning for swimmers while 12-year-old Zachary Reyna fights for his life against a brain-eating parasite.
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Applies to tropical countries in the ASEAN Area...

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Do Clinical Trials Work in Education?

Do Clinical Trials Work in Education? | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it

A recent article in The New York Times asked a provocative question: Do clinical trials work? The article was written about clinical trials in medicine, especially cancer research, where it often happens that promising medications and procedures found to be effective in small studies turn out to be ineffective in large ones. 

As an advocate of clinical trials (randomized experiments) in education, I found the article distressing. In education, as in medicine, larger and better-controlled experiments frequently fail to find positive effects of programs found to be effective in smaller and less-well-controlled studies. In fact, there is a clear relationship between study sample sizes and outcomes: The larger the study, the lower the reported impact of the treatment.


Some in both medicine and education are wondering if different research methods are needed that are more likely to show positive effects. In my view, this is foolish. The problem is not in the research methods. What we need to do is to identify why so many experiments show no impacts, and solve those problems.

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'Just in time" research and the related costs...

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The Current State Of STEM In The United States - Edudemic

The Current State Of STEM In The United States - Edudemic | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it

STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) jobs are still a major focus for the education community. With jobs in these fields generally being much higher paying and in demand than in other fields, we’ve been focusing a lot on the importance of getting all students interested in these fields and understanding that there is opportunity there for everyone.

 

With all of this discussion and promotion of STEM in the United States and jobs in the associated fields, it can sometimes even feel like there’s a push to move students away from other fields, and from jobs that don’t require very specific STEM training.

 

That said, its important to remember that there are a wide array of jobs that need to get done, and we’ll always need people to do them. Many of them are more STEM related than previously identified; Just because a particular job doesn’t require a graduate degree or a specialized type of degree beyond high school (for example:

 

Engineers commonly need at least a Bachelor’s degree in engineering, if not a higher degree), doesn’t mean that it isn’t a STEM related job.

Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s insight:

21st century teaching involves all educational stakholders at all levels.

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Immune System Disorders: What Are They?

Immune System Disorders: What Are They? | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it

WebMD explains Immune system disorders cause abnormally low activity or overactivity of the immune system.


In cases of immune system overactivity, the body attacks and damages its own tissues (autoimmune diseases).


Immune deficiency diseases decrease the body's ability to fight invaders, causing vulnerability to infections.

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A good medical English overview on autoimmune disorders and diseases.

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Slideshow: 24 Foods That Can Save Your Heart

Slideshow: 24 Foods That Can Save Your Heart | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it
The top foods for heart health go beyond cholesterol busters to edamame, nuts, salmon, even coffee, in this list from WebMD. Cooking tips and pictures show how to work new foods into your diet.
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Up to date slide show for medical education.

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Aligning Academic Continuing Medical Education With... [Acad Med. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

Aligning Academic Continuing Medical Education With... [Acad Med. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it

The recent health care quality improvement (QI) movement has called for significant changes to the way that health care is delivered and taught in academic medical centers (AMCs). This movement also has affected academic continuing medical education (CME). In January 2011, to better align the CME and QI efforts of AMCs, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) launched a pilot initiative called Aligning and Educating for Quality (ae4Q). 

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New updates AAMC - CME's.

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National Center on Accessible Instructional Materials | Teaching and Learning Resources

National Center on Accessible Instructional Materials | Teaching and Learning Resources | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it

THE AIM AND NIMAS CENTERS, SUPPORTED BY THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS (OSEP),
works with states, TA systems, disability advocates, national associations, technology experts, publishers, and content conversion houses to improve the timely delivery of high-quality accessible educational materials to students with disabilities.

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World class teaching and learning resources!

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The Center on Online Learning and Students with Disabilities - Teaching and Learning Resources

The Center on Online Learning and Students with Disabilities - Teaching and Learning Resources | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it

The Center for Research on Learning, at the University of Kansas Lawrence campus, is an internationally recognized research and development organization noted for creating solutions that dramatically improve quality of life, learning, and performance — especially for those who experience barriers to success.

 

In the mid-1970s, passage of a federal education law required that special education services be delivered to all students who needed them from kindergarten through high school. That law changed the education landscape and planted the seed for what is now the Center for Research on Learning.

 

CRL’s work centers on solving the problems that limit individuals’ quality of life and their ability to learn and perform in school, work, home, or the community.

 

CRL specifically studies problems in education and work to place solutions that make a difference into the hands of educators, learners, employers, and policy makers. Long-term goals of the Center include research, development, professional development, organizational change, and dissemination that reach the largest possible audiences.

Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s insight:

From the University of Kansas - Lawrence, great teaching and learning resources.

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Human Body Maps | 3D Models of the Human Anatomy

Human Body Maps | 3D Models of the Human Anatomy | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it
BodyMaps is an interactive visual search tool that allows users to explore the human body in 3-D.
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Free 3D models for teaching.

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Transplant of human gut bacteria could help make an obese person thin, study suggests

Transplant of human gut bacteria could help make an obese person thin, study suggests | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it

The microorganisms in the human gut appear to play a pivotal role in determining whether a person is lean or obese, new research shows.

 

The study, published in Science, is the strongest evidence yet that what’s inside an individual’s digestive tract influences the risk of obesity and its related health problems, such as Type 2 diabetes. The work helps explain the nation’s 30-year run-up in excess weight—and it may supply a potential solution to the resulting epidemic, experts said.

 

“Many factors contribute to obesity,” said the study’s senior author, Dr. Jeffrey I. Gordon, director of the Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology at Washington University, St. Louis. For people whose gut organisms are not equipped to fight obesity, it may be possible to “add microbes to fill the vacancies” needed to keep a person lean and healthy, he said.

 

Gordon and a multinational group of scientists sought to isolate the gut microbiome’s effect on obesity from better-known influences such as genes, diet and exercise.

 

They recruited four sets of identical female twins in which one twin was lean and the other obese. Through stool samples, the researchers gathered a representative collection of the bacteria, viruses and protozoans flourishing in each woman’s gut. They transplanted that microscopic zoo into a large group of mice whose intestines were essentially a blank slate.

 

Almost immediately, the mix of living organisms inside a mouse’s digestive tract began to resemble the one inside its human donor. Soon the mice came to resemble more and more the women whose gut microbiomes they had adopted.

 

Despite eating about the same amount of the same low-fat chow, mice that got transplants from an obese twin began to gain weight and lay down fat deposits. The mice that got transplants from a lean twin remained lean.

The intestinal flora of the lean mice also worked better at breaking down and fermenting dietary sugars than did their counterparts in the obese mice. In the mice that got transplants from a lean twin, undigestible starches passed through the digestive system more speedily, resulting in thinner mice.

 

“It was a very, very clear, elegant, well-thought-out study,” said Dr. Lawrence J. Brandt, a gastroenterologist at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City who wasn’t involved in the research. By stripping out the effects of genes and diet, the experiment helps refine experts’ understanding of the specific ways that the gut’s living organisms influence a complex phenomenon like weight gain, he said.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Thank you for sharing.

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Ellen Diane's comment, September 9, 2013 4:31 PM
I have always gone with my gut instinct:) mind /body/spirit
Dorothy M Neddermeyer, PhD's comment, September 9, 2013 4:38 PM
Ellen: No pun intended, right? Gut instinct is far more effective when the gut flora is healthy. We live in a world where everything is connected to everything else. Everything we do, say, think and believe affects--Mind, Body and Spirit, others and the universe.
Ellen Diane's comment, September 9, 2013 4:43 PM
I am connected- to my gut-
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Aligning Academic Continuing Medical Education With Quality Improvement: A Model for the 21st Century

Aligning Academic Continuing Medical Education With Quality Improvement: A Model for the 21st Century | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it
The recent health care quality improvement (QI) movement has called for significant changes to the way that health care is delivered and taught in academic medical centers (AMCs).
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Right on topic!

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Just Imagine: New Paradigms for Medical Education : Academic Medicine

Just Imagine:  New Paradigms for Medical Education : Academic Medicine | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it

For all its traditional successes, the current model of medical education in the United States and Canada is being challenged on issues of quality, throughput, and cost, a process that has exposed numerous shortcomings in its efforts to meet the needs of the nations' health care systems. A radical change in direction is required because the current path will not lead to a solution.

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Educational Evolution...

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What neuroscience teaches us about creativity

What neuroscience teaches us about creativity | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it
What neuroscience teaches us about creativity What is creativity? How would you define it if someone asked you to? Steve Jobs once said: “Creativity is just connecting things.” The great French chef...

Via stan stewart
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Interesting perceptive...

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Ariane Bourgeois's comment, August 16, 2013 10:13 PM
Thanks you for your rescoop, Jim :)
Debra Felske's curator insight, August 17, 2013 9:13 AM

We are discovering more and more each day about the connection between neuroscience, creativity and success.  Very exciting stuff!

stan stewart's comment, August 17, 2013 8:05 PM
Thanks for all the rescoops and plugs!
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Promising results from the world's first oncolytic-virus cancer therapy trial

Promising results from the world's first oncolytic-virus cancer therapy trial | 21st Century Medical English Teaching and Technology Resources | Scoop.it

Researchers from the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (OHRI), the University of Ottawa (uOttawa), Jennerex Inc. and several other institutions today reported promising results of a world-first cancer therapy trial in the renowned journal Nature.

 

The trial is the first to show that an intravenously-delivered viral therapy can consistently infect and spread within tumours without harming normal tissues in humans. It is also the first to show tumor-selective expression of a foreign gene after intravenous delivery.

 

The trial involved 23 patients (including seven at The Ottawa Hospital), all with advanced cancers that had spread to multiple organs and failed to respond to standard treatments. The patients received a single intravenous infusion of a virus called JX-594, at one of five dose levels, and biopsies were obtained eight to 10 days later. Seven of eight patients (87 per cent) in the two highest dose groups had evidence of viral replication in their tumor, but not in normal tissues. All of these patients also showed tumor-selective expression of a foreign gene that was engineered into the virus to help with detection. The virus was well tolerated at all dose levels, with the most common side effect being mild to moderate flu-like symptoms that lasted less than one day.

 

"We are very excited because this is the first time in medical history that a viral therapy has been shown to consistently and selectively replicate in cancer tissue after intravenous infusion in humans," said Dr. John Bell, a Senior Scientist at OHRI, Professor of Medicine at uOttawa and senior co-author on the publication. "Intravenous delivery is crucial for cancer 

 IMAGE: Dr. John Bell, a cancer research scientist at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and the University of Ottawa, is a leader in developing oncolytic viruses for the treatment of cancer.

Click here for more information.

 

treatment because it allows us to target tumors throughout the body as opposed to just those that we can directly inject. The study is also important because it shows that we can use this approach to selectively express foreign genes in tumours, opening the door to a whole new suite of targeted cancer therapies."

 

Dr. Bell and his team have been investigating cancer-fighting (oncolytic) viruses at OHRI for more than 10 years. JX-594 was developed in partnership with Jennerex Inc., a biotherpeutics company co-founded by Dr. Bell in Ottawa and Dr. David Kirn in San Francisco. JX-594 is derived from a strain of vaccinia virus that has been used extensively as a live vaccine against smallpox. It has a natural ability to replicate preferentially in cancer cells, but it has also been genetically engineered to enhance its anti-cancer properties.

 

"Oncolytic viruses are unique because they can attack tumours in multiple ways, they have very mild side effects compared to other treatments, and they can be easily customized for different kinds of cancer," said Dr. Bell. "We're still in the early stages of testing these viruses in patients, but I believe that someday, viruses and other biological therapies could truly transform our approach for treating cancer."

 

Although the current trial was designed primarily to assess safety and delivery of JX-594, anti-tumor activity was also evaluated. Six of eight patients (75%) in the two highest dose groups experienced a shrinking or stabilization of their tumor, while those in lower dose groups were less likely to experience this effect.

 

"These results are promising, especially for such an early-stage trial, with only one dose of therapy," said Dr. Bell. "But of course, we will need to do more trials to know if this virus can truly make a difference for patients. We are working hard to get these trials started, and at the same time, we are also working in the laboratory to advance our understanding of these viruses and figure out how best to use them."

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Thank you for sharing.

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