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Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING
INNOVATION from every field that can be applied to human health.
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Cancer and Cell-phones: Human Saliva Indicates a link to cancer development due to High Oxidative Stress Levels in Heavy Cell Phone Users

Cancer and Cell-phones:  Human Saliva Indicates a link to cancer development  due to High Oxidative Stress Levels in Heavy Cell Phone Users | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

Those who more regularly used their cell phone had higher oxidative stress levels--a process that damages aspects of the human cell, including DNA through the development of toxic peroxide and free radicals, according to background information via the study. Hamzany notes that this can be a major risk factor for the development of cancer.

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Increasing use of mobile phones creates growing concerns regarding harmful effects of radiofrequency nonionizing electromagnetic radiation on human tissues located close to the ear, where phones are commonly held for long periods of time. We studied 20 subjects in the mobile-phone group who had a mean duration of mobile phone use of 12.5 years (range 8–15) and a mean time use of 29.6 h per month (range 8–100). Deaf individuals served as controls. We compared salivary outcomes (secretion, oxidative damage indices, flow rate, and composition) between mobile phone users and nonusers. We report a significant increase in all salivary oxidative stress indices studied in mobile phone users. Salivary flow, total protein, albumin, and amylase activity were decreased in mobile phone users. These observations lead to the hypothesis that the use of mobile phonesmay cause oxidative stress and modify salivary function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 622–627.

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Make It Stand: Balancing Shapes for 3D Fabrication.

ACM SIGGRAPH 2013 paper http://igl.ethz.ch/projects/make-it-stand

 

The Interactive Geometry Lab is a research group within the Institute of Visual Computing of ETH Zurich, led by Prof. Olga Sorkine-Hornung.

"We do research in Computer Graphics, focusing on interactive shape modeling and animation, digital geometry processing, as well as image and video processing."

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Imbalance suggests a feeling of dynamism and movement in static objects. It is therefore not surprising that many 3D models stand in impossibly balanced configurations. As long as the models remain in a computer this is of no consequence: the laws of physics do not apply. However, fabrication through 3D printing breaks the illusion: printed models topple instead of standing as initially intended. We propose to assist users in producing novel, properly balanced designs by interactively deforming an existing model. We formulate balance optimization as an energy minimization, improving stability by modifying the volume of the object, while preserving its surface details. This takes place during interactive editing: the user cooperates with our optimizer towards the end result. We demonstrate our method on a variety of models. With our technique, users can produce fabricated objects that stand in one or more surprising poses without requiring glue or heavy pedestals.

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Tattoo biosensor warns when athletes are about to 'hit the wall'

Tattoo biosensor warns when athletes are about to 'hit the wall' | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
A new biosensor, applied to the human skin like a temporary tattoo, can alert marathoners, competitive bikers and other 'extreme' athletes that they're about to 'hit the wall', scientists are reporting.
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Stem Cell Eye Cells Tested in Mice

Stem Cell Eye Cells Tested in Mice | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Scientists turn embryonic stem cells into photoreceptors that can integrate into a live retina.
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

they are in the way to repair retina defects. No more bionic eyes. Now we need someone to 3D-print full eyeballs in plastic, with integrated lens and a living retina.

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Spanish researchers reformulate the model of mitochondrial function and explain how cells extract energy from nutrients

Spanish researchers reformulate the model of mitochondrial function and explain how cells extract energy from nutrients | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III  http://www.cnic.es

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Once again someone did not take for granted what others said, and went a step further 

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Soft Exosuit : Wyss Institute at Harvard

Soft Exosuit : Wyss Institute at Harvard | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Wyss Institute at Harvard
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

This is the alternative to hard exo-skeletons

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3D patterning of blood vessels: Creating a fertile landscape for engineered tissues

3D patterning of blood vessels: Creating a fertile landscape for engineered tissues | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

Dr. Christopher Chen’s group, from the University of Pennsylvania. has recently was able to mix both current strategies to help create vascularized tissues. In their approach they made networks of tiny “cords” out of collagen and endothelial cells (the cells that line blood vessels). These cords are not substitute blood vessels, but when they are implanted into an animal model, the endothelial cells send signals to the body to replace the cords with capillaries.

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

The brilliance of this technique is that the patient’s body forms natural blood vessels, but in an accelerated fashion due to signals from the endothelial cells in the cords. Furthermore, you have some control over the 3D network of vessels that form, because the cords serve as template that gets replaced. This geometric control is important because many tissues in our bodies have a specific vascular architecture. In fact, the investigators go onto show that when they implant engineered liver tissue along with their cords, the liver becomes more functional (based on an enzyme assay) than if it were implanted alongside random cell seeding. Overall the technique is creative, inspiring, and a useful step forward for vascular engineering.

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Lung on a Chip

Combining microfabrication techniques with modern tissue engineering, lung-on-a-chip offers a new in vitro approach to drug screening by mimicking the complicated…
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Graphene as a Long-Term Metal Oxidation Barrier: Worse Than Nothing

Graphene as a Long-Term Metal Oxidation Barrier: Worse Than Nothing | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

It has been shown that over long time scales graphene promotes more extensive wet corrosion than that seen for an initially bare, unprotected Cu surface. This surprising result has important implications for future scientific studies and industrial applications.

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Worldwide Orthopaedic Product Sales Reached $43.1 Billion in 2012

Worldwide Orthopaedic Product Sales Reached $43.1 Billion in 2012 | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

Trauma and Sports Medicine Segments Lead Growth 

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Carlos Garcia Pando's comment, June 13, 2013 5:04 AM
the report is $595
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Silicon Nitride Technology

Silicon Nitride Technology | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Med-Tech Innovation is a cutting edge website catering to the medical
device industry. Featuring the latest news, research and innovation in the Medical Devices Industry
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Looks interesting. Is anybody using this material? I would like to know.

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Cambridge Firm Launches First-Of-Its-Kind Spinal Cord Injury Study - WBUR

Cambridge Firm Launches First-Of-Its-Kind Spinal Cord Injury Study - WBUR | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
WBUR
Cambridge Firm Launches First-Of-Its-Kind Spinal Cord Injury Study
WBUR
Several years later, he happened to meet MIT chemical engineer Bob Langer, who had decades earlier developed a polymer material as a support in tissue engineering.

Via Jacob Blumenthal
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Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, May 21, 2013 10:24 AM

InVivo Therapeutics Corp. is about to initiate a spinal cord injury clinical trial, with one of its products, a tiny scaffold. This scaffold is going to be implanted directly into the wound in the spinal cord, the goal being to stop the injury in its tracks and stabilize the area.

Company's website: http://www.invivotherapeutics.com/about-us/our-team/eric-woodard-md/

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More studies from the Urban Research Group (Clemson University)

More studies from the Urban Research Group (��Clemson University) | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

Our research interests are fairly diversified. One of the current efforts focuses on stimuli-responsive polymeric materials, molecular level events which govern their physico-chemical behaviors, and the influence of heterogeneity of networks on film formation. 

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New Type of Glass Implant Heals Broken Bones

New Type of Glass Implant Heals Broken Bones | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology have developed a type of glass implant that could one day be used to repair injured bones in the arms, legs and other areas of the body that are most subject to the stresses of weight.
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Top 20 Medtech Companies in 2018

Top 20 Medtech Companies in 2018 | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
This is a slideshow of the top 20 medical technology companies by revenue in 2018. The data's source is the Evaluate MedTech World Preview 2018 report released by Evaluate, a London-based life science business intelligence firm.
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A nanotechnology holy grail in label-free cancer marker detection: Single molecules

A nanotechnology holy grail in label-free cancer marker detection: Single molecules | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Just months after setting a record for detecting the smallest single virus in solution, researchers at the Polytechnic Institute of New York University announced a new breakthrough: A nano-enhanced version of their biosensor detected a single...
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10 Bioengineered Body Parts That Could Change Medicine

10 Bioengineered Body Parts That Could Change Medicine | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

When physicians run out of treatment options, they look to a nascent field known as bioengineering for solutions to their patients' ailments. Specialized scientists apply engineering principles to biological systems, opening up the possibility of creating new human tissue, organs, blood and even corneas such as the one shown here. Waiting lists for organ transplants continue to be lengthy so the race to save lives with bioengineered body parts is on. Here’s a look at some of the most notable achievements in recent years.


Via Jacob Blumenthal
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Type 2 Diabetes Patients Benefit From Bone Marrow Stem-Cell Transplants, Reduces Insulin Use

Type 2 Diabetes Patients Benefit From Bone Marrow Stem-Cell Transplants, Reduces Insulin Use | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Transplanted bone marrow stem cells received in patients with type 2 diabetes may be able to help patients suffering from the disease require less insulin and live lives that require less treatment.
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Anything related with diabetes is interesting.

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Shaky sensor: a cantilever covered with bacteria shakes up and down as bacteria metabolize on its surface

Shaky sensor: a cantilever covered with bacteria shakes up and down as bacteria metabolize on its surface | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

A patient admitted to a hospital with a serious bacterial infection may have only a few hours to live. Figuring out which antibiotic to administer, however, can take days. Doctors must grow the microbes in the presence of the drugs and see whether they reproduce. Rush the process, and they risk prescribing ineffective antibiotics, exposing the patient to unnecessary side effects, and spreading antibiotic resistance. Now, researchers have developed a microscopic "tuning fork" that detects tiny vibrations in bacteria. The device might one day allow physicians to tell the difference between live and dead microbes—and enable them to recognize effective and ineffective antibiotics within minutes.

 

"It's a brilliant method," provided subsequent investigations confirm the researchers' interpretation of their data, says Martin Hegner, a biophysicist at Trinity College Dublin who was not involved in the work.

 

The research involves tiny, flexible bars called cantilevers that vibrate up and down like the prongs of a tuning fork when they receive an input of energy. Cantilevers are an important part of atomic force microscopy, which is useful for making atomic scale resolutions of surfaces for use in nanotechnology or atomic physics research. In this technique, a minute needle attached to a cantilever moves across a surface, and the deflection of the cantilever gives information about how atoms are arranged on the surface. It can even be used to shunt atoms around. More recently, however, they have been used without the needle as tiny oscillators, allowing scientists to investigate matter directly attached to the cantilever.

 

Biophysicist Giovanni Longo and colleagues at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne and the University of Lausanne in Switzerland immersed these cantilevers in a liquid bacterial growth medium and monitored their movement using a laser. They found that the bare cantilever moved very slightly as a result of the thermal movement of the liquid molecules in the medium. They then covered both sides of the cantilever with Escherichia coli bacteria, which can cause food poisoning, and immediately found that the oscillations became much more pronounced. The researchers believe that chemical processes that occur inside the bacteria as they metabolize energy are driving the oscillation. "What we see is that if you have some sort of a moving system on the cantilever, you are going to induce a movement on the cantilever itself," Longo explains. "Exactly what kind of metabolic movement we see is something that we are still studying."

 

To determine if the cantilevers could detect the impact of drugs, the team added ampicillin, an antibiotic that the cultured bacteria were sensitive to. 

 

The size of the cantilever's oscillations decreased almost 20-fold within 5 minutes, the researchers report. Fifteen minutes later, the scientists flushed the antibiotic out with fresh growth medium, but the movement of the cantilever did not increase again. This, the researchers say, suggests that the antibiotic had killed the bacteria. When they used an ampicillin-resistant strain of E. coli, however, they found that the oscillations initially decreased but returned to normal within about 15 minutes, indicating that the microbes had recovered.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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New Artificial Heart to Be Tested | MIT Technology Review

New Artificial Heart to Be Tested | MIT Technology Review | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
A French company is preparing to test a complex artificial heart that combines biology with machinery.
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

A new kind of artificial heart that combines synthetic and biological materials as well as sensors and software to detect a patient’s level of exertion and adjust output accordingly is to be tested in patients at four cardiac surgery centers in Europe and the Middle East. If the “bioprosthetic” device, made by the Paris-based Carmat, proves to be safe and effective, it could be given to patients waiting for a heart transplant


Carmat’s design is a two chamber pneumatic device in which each chamber  is divided by a membrane that holds hydraulic fluid on one side. A motorized pump moves hydraulic fluid in and out of the chambers, and that fluid causes the membrane to move; blood flows through the other side of each membrane. The blood-facing side of the membrane is made of tissue obtained from a sac that surrounds a cow’s heart, to make the device more biocompatible.

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Wyss Institute awarded DARPA contract to further advance sepsis therapeutic device : The artificial spleen

Wyss Institute awarded DARPA contract to further advance sepsis therapeutic device : The artificial spleen | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

“Studies have shown that every hour a patient receives the wrong antibiotic—even a strong broad-spectrum antibiotic—mortality increases by 5 to 9 percent,” says Ingber.Wyss Institute at Harvard

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Sepsis, which kills millions of people worldwide each year, occurs when chemicals the body releases to fight an infection in the bloodstream trigger an inflammatory response throughout the body. The worst cases can lead to the failure of multiple organs. Since any one of a range of organisms can cause the problem, a patient believed to have sepsis is usually given a so-called broad-spectrum antibiotic while doctors culture the blood in attempt to identify the specific organism at fault so they can prescribe the specific antibiotic that will target it. This process can take several days.

But the broad-spectrum antibiotic doesn’t always work, and in many cases the blood culture fails to identify the pathogen. Meanwhile, delaying the administration of the proper drug by mere hours can significantly reduce a patient’s chance of survival. 

 

Sepsis is also a leading killer of soldiers in combat, and that's why DARPA is aiming to develop a portable “dialysis-like” therapy that would quickly cleanse blood that has been removed from the body and then return it. The desired technology would be capable of removing many different types of pathogens and would function without the need for anticoagulants, which can cause a wounded warrior to bleed out. Dialysis patients usually have to take anticoagulants so that their blood doesn’t clot inside the dialysis machine’s tubing.

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Surgeons at Duke University Hospital Implant Bioengineered Vein

Surgeons at Duke University Hospital Implant Bioengineered Vein | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

In a first-of-its-kind operation in the United States, a team of doctors at Duke University Hospital helped create a bioengineered blood vessel and transplanted it into the arm of a patient with end-stage kidney disease.

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Carlos Garcia Pando's curator insight, June 13, 2013 6:25 AM

It is a very interesting article, although it might result confusing. I had to read it three times to extract the actual procedure. As far as I understodd it is as follows.

 

MARKET SIZE:

More than 350,000 people in the United States require hemodialysis, which often necessitates a graft to connect an artery to a vein to speed blood flow during treatments. If this bioengineered veins prove beneficial for hemodialysis patients, the researchers ultimately aim to develop a readily available and durable graft for heart bypass surgeries, which are performed on nearly 400,000 people in the United States a year, and to treat blocked blood vessels in the limbs.

 

INITIAL TARGET AND GOAL:

Originally, the researchers sought to develop veins using a person’s own cells to seed the scaffolding, reducing the risk that the patient’s body would reject the implanted tissue. But growing personalized veins took too much time and ruled out mass production, so the researchers changed tack to develop a universal product.

 

PROCEDURE:

Using technology developed at Duke and at a spin-off company it started called Humacyte,

 

*   Manufacturing a biodegradable tubular scaffold mesh

*   Seeding donated human muscle cells on the scaffold

*   Growing them in a special medium of amino acids, vitamins and other   nutrients, dissolving the scaffold to form a vessel.

*   During the growth process the nutrients are pumped through the tube in a heartbeat rhythm pulsing force to build the physical properties that are similar to native blood vessels

*   The now living vessel is then cleansed leaving a collagen structure that does not trigger an immune response, because it is not alive

*   The whole process to make a life-like vein takes about two months.

 

RESULT:

The product is an off-the-shelf human cell-based bioengineered non-living immunologically silent graft, that mechanically matches the arteries and veins they will be sewn to, and which eventually adopts the cellular properties of the host’s blood vessel.

 

 

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Additive Manufacturing - by GE aviation

GE Aviation is revolutionizing the age-old rules of manufacturing and design. Learn how additive manufacturing, a 3D printing technology, frees engineers to ...
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Device allows visually impaired to read and move around freely

Device allows visually impaired to read and move around freely | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
A company has developed a camera-based system intended to give the visually impaired the ability to both “read” easily and move freely.

 

Liat Negrin, an Israeli who has been visually impaired since childhood, walked into a grocery store here recently, picked up a can of vegetables and easily read its label using a simple and unobtrusive camera attached to her glasses. Ms. Negrin, who has coloboma, a birth defect that perforates a structure of the eye and afflicts about 1 in 10,000 people, is an employee at OrCam, an Israeli start-up that has developed a camera-based system intended to give the visually impaired the ability to both “read” easily and move freely.

 

Until now reading aids for the visually impaired and the blind have been cumbersome devices that recognize text in restricted environments, or, more recently, have been software applications on smartphones that have limited capabilities.

 

In contrast, the OrCam device is a small camera worn in the style of Google Glass, connected by a thin cable to a portable computer designed to fit in the wearer’s pocket. The system clips on to the wearer’s glasses with a small magnet and uses a bone-conduction speaker to offer clear speech as it reads aloud the words or object pointed to by the user.

 

The system is designed to both recognize and speak “text in the wild,” a term used to describe newspaper articles as well as bus numbers, and objects as diverse as landmarks, traffic lights and the faces of friends.

 

It currently recognizes English-language text and beginning this week will be sold through the company’s Web site for $2,500, about the cost of a midrange hearing aid. It is the only product, so far, of the privately held company, which is part of the high-tech boom in Israel.

 

The device is quite different from other technology that has been developed to give some vision to people who are blind, like the artificial retina system called Argus II, made by Second Sight Medical Products. That system, which was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in February, allows visual signals to bypass a damaged retina and be transmitted to the brain.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Nineteenth Century Technique Turns Old Mouse Hearts Young

Nineteenth Century Technique Turns Old Mouse Hearts Young | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Nineteenth Century Technique Turns Old Mouse Hearts Young - ScienceNOW

Link to the paper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S009286741300456X

 

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

As a fan of the 19th century Sci-Fi writers I like to hear this. Once again those great people that modeled their future -our present- prove to have been right.

I don't know exactly who this refers to, but I'll try and find out.

 

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