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Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING
INNOVATION from every field that can be applied to human health.
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Rescooped by Carlos Garcia Pando from Additive Manufacturing News
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First 510(k) Clearance for Customized 3D-Printed Polymeric Cranial Implants

First 510(k) Clearance for Customized 3D-Printed Polymeric Cranial Implants | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
OPM’s polymer-based cranial implants, made with additive manufacturing technology from EOS, offer improved patient outcomes with reduced surgical costs.
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Carlos Garcia Pando's curator insight, November 27, 2013 12:53 PM

 “EOS is clearly the leader for high-temperature industrial 3D printers,” says DeFelice. “We found their technology to be the only laser-sintering system in the world that can run high-temperature materials such as PEKK.” Since that selection, OPM has developed a long-term relationship with EOS. “They were with us when we explored this business opportunity, which ultimately led to the implementation of a P 800 system in our South Windsor, Connecticut facility around two years ago. We were a fairly early adopter of high-temperature laser fabrication, and in the context of the OsteoFab™ technology’s entire development cycle, we moved very quickly. EOS supported us throughout the process.”

 

Since 2000, DeFelice has built OPM’s business solely on the shoulders of PEKK. Aside from developing a variety of biomedical and industrial materials under the brand name OXPEKK®, OPM has produced a number of what he calls “bony void” replacements using their patented OsteoFabTM process, including cranial implants, mandibular and orbital augments, as well as spinal cages

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Mind control: Low freq. magnetic fields applied to discreet areas in the cortex modify consciousness state

Stanford neuroscientists have for the first time traced how three brain networks mediate the mind's internal focus and its processing of stimuli from the outside world.
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

They say they're looking for therapies, but the Conspiracy Theory tells us they're after perfect mind control!

 

The study also turned up intriguing clues toward new therapies. One of the executive network nodes they stimulated was closely associated with inhibiting a specific area of the default mode that scientists believe is crucial to the antidepressant effects of magnetic stimulation and drug therapies. That could offer neurological clues to why magnetic stimulation appears to work - an effect that has remained somewhat mysterious.

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Saving a baby’s life with a 3-D laser printer

Saving a baby’s life with a 3-D laser printer | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
The part of his windpipe that carries air to his left lung would suddenly collapse. Children die from tracheobronchomalacia, but I hoped that help could be found for these children.
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Carlos Garcia Pando's curator insight, November 20, 2013 11:48 PM

Is not a recent case (may 2013) but anyway it is interesting. Again, I personally would not call "3D printer" this kind of professional machine using a laser. in 1:58 they show the process ant it seems an EOS P-100 machine. definitely not a 3d printer.

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NeuroPace: treatment of medically refractory partial epilepsy

NeuroPace: treatment of medically refractory partial epilepsy | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

The RNS neurostimulator is a programmable, battery powered, microprocessor-controlled device that delivers a short train of electrical pulses to the brain through implanted leads. In treating epilepsy, the RNS neurostimulator is designed to detect abnormal electrical activity in the brain and respond by delivering electrical stimulation to normalize brain activity before the patient experiences seizures. The neurostimulator is implanted in the cranium and connected to one or two leads that are implanted near the patient's seizure focus.

 

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Special camera detects tumors

Special camera detects tumors | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Cancer patients have the highest probability of recovering if tumors are completely removed. However, tiny clusters of cancer cells are often difficult for surgeons to recognize and remove. A camera makes hidden tumors visible during an operation.
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Project Group for Automation in Medicine and Biotechnology (PAMB)  have developed a new surgical aid, a multispectral fluorescence camera system. In the future, this special camera will integrate into various medical imaging systems such as surgical microscopes and endoscopes, etc. 

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Wright Medical acquires the French foot and ankle company Biotech International for $80M

Wright Medical acquires the French foot and ankle company Biotech International for $80M | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

“The acquisition of Biotech International is an excellent fit for our Extremities business, enabling us to immediately expand our direct foot and ankle presence in Europe and add a base of extremity revenue that we can effectively grow on a go-forward basis. In addition, Biotech’s products complement our existing foot and ankle portfolio and include several specialized products that expand our extremities product offering. We plan to utilize Biotech’s strong direct sales channel in France and established distributor presence in emerging markets to extend the reach of our international distribution network and further accelerate growth opportunities in our global Extremities business.”

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Wright will acquire 100% of Biotech’s outstanding equity shares on a fully diluted basis at a total offer price of up to $80 million as follows: $75 million payable at closing, comprised of approximately $55 million of cash and $20 million of Wright common stock, and up to an additional $5 million of cash contingent upon the achievement of certain revenue milestones in 2014 and 2015.

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A man regains a normal life thanks to a prosthetic nose. Of course, there is some 3d printing involved

A man regains a normal life thanks to a prosthetic nose. Of course, there is some 3d printing involved | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Un homme qui avait subi une ablation du nez a pu retrouver son visage grâce à des technologies de pointe
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

With video

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Carlos Garcia Pando's curator insight, October 17, 2013 11:58 AM

Somo prototyping involved

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By triggering or silencing certain brain cells, mice eat or stop eating regardless of hunger

By triggering or silencing certain brain cells, mice eat or stop eating regardless of hunger | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

By hijacking connections between neurons deep within the brain, scientists forced full mice to keep eating and hungry mice to shun food. By identifying precise groups of cells that cause eating and others that curb it, the results begin to clarify the intricate web of checks and balances in the brain that control feeding.

 

“This is a really important missing piece of the puzzle,” says neuroscientist Seth Blackshaw of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. “These are cell types that weren’t even predicted to exist.” A deeper understanding of how the brain orchestrates eating behavior could lead to better treatments for disorders such as anorexia and obesity, he says.

 

Scientists led by Joshua Jennings and Garret Stuber of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill genetically tweaked mice so that a small group of neurons would respond to light. When a laser shone into the brain, these cells would either fire or, in a different experiment, stay quiet. These neurons reside in a brain locale called the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, or BNST. Some of the message-sending arms of these neurons reach into the lateral hypothalamus, a brain region known to play a big role in feeding.

 

When a laser activated these BNST neurons, the mice became ravenous, voraciously eating their food, the researchers report in the Sept. 27, 2013 Science. “As soon as you turn it on, they start eating and they don’t stop until you turn it off,” Stuber says. The opposite behavior happened when a laser silenced BNST neurons’ messages to the lateral hypothalamus: The mice would not eat, even when hungry.

 

The results illuminate a complex network of neuron connections, in which some cells boost other neurons’ activity, while other cells apply brakes. In the experiment, stimulating BNST neurons with light — which consequently shut down the activity of neurons in the lateral hypothalamus — led to the overeating behavior, the team found. That result suggests that these lateral hypothalamus neurons normally restrict feeding.

 

That finding is surprising, says Blackshaw. Earlier experiments hinted that these hypothalamic cells would encourage eating behavior, but the new study suggests the exact opposite.

 

The researchers don’t know whether, if they controlled the neurons for long periods, the mice would ultimately starve or overeat to the point of illness. Stuber and colleagues used the laser technique, called optogenetics, in roughly 20-minute bursts. Longer-term manipulations of these neural connections — perhaps using a drug — might cause lasting changes in appetite and, as a result, body mass, Stuber says.

 

This precise control of feeding behavior underscores the fact that eating disorders occur when brain systems go awry, Stuber says. “We think of feeding in terms of metabolism and body stuff,” he says. “But at the end of the day, it’s controlled by the brain.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Microscale Polymer Bottles Corked with a Phase-Change Material for Temperature-Controlled Release

Microscale Polymer Bottles Corked with a Phase-Change Material for Temperature-Controlled Release | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Microscale polystyrene (PS) bottles are loaded with dye molecules and then corked with a phase-change material (PCM). When the temperature is raised beyond its melting point, the PCM quickly melts and triggers an instant release of the encapsulated dye. The release profiles can be manipulated by using a binary mixture of PCMs with different melting points.

 

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Spain stands at the forefront of Google Glass-enabled medicine: the first Google Glass surgery

Spain stands at the forefront of Google Glass-enabled medicine: the first Google Glass surgery | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

Spanish medicine stands to turn Google Glass from spring 2014’s hottest accessoryinto a way to save lives. From the first surgery performed entirely through the eye of the Glass to dozens of mobile applications, Spanish Glass-based innovation is poised to change the way doctors work and communicate

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Guillen is ready to perform his next Google Glass surgery on September 17, where he will be able to show from his perspective another operation that he invented — wireless arthroscopic surgery, which was first performed in 2007. Guillen and his team at the Clínica CEMTRO de Madrid invented the Wireless Arthroscopic Device (WAD), which is a tiny camera inserted through a small incision used to examine and sometimes repair a damaged joint. Since the joint isn’t fully opened, recovery time is much shorter.

He said that his clinic is “probably the top in the world” for such surgeries and that “all of my patients are out-patient,” including former Spanish prime minister Jose Maria Aznar, footballer Fernando “El Niño” Torres, and several rhythmic gymnasts, an Olympic sport that Spain typically medals in.

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Jed Fisher's curator insight, September 10, 2013 1:08 PM

Fantastic use case.

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Ekso bionic suit - Schön Klinik Bad Aibling, Germany

Ekso™ is a bionic suit, or exoskeleton, which enables individuals with lower extremity paralysis to stand up and walk over ground with a weight bearing, four...
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Single gene change increases mouse lifespan by 20 percent

Single gene change increases mouse lifespan by 20 percent | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

By lowering the expression of a single gene, researchers at the National Institutes of Health have extended the average lifespan of a group of mice by about 20 percent -- the equivalent of raising the average human lifespan by 16 years, from 79 to 95. The research team targeted a gene called mTOR, which is involved in metabolism and energy balance, and may be connected with the increased lifespan associated with caloric restriction

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New portable device for at-home kidney tests

New portable device for at-home kidney tests | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON: Scientists have developed a lightweight and portable device that attaches to a smartphone and can be used to conduct at-home kidney tests and get instant results. The gadget may...
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

The gadget may significantly reduce the need for frequent hospital visits by people with diabetes and others with chronic kidney ailments.

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The Engineer who fixed his own heart has helped save the life of 40 people

The Engineer who fixed his own heart has helped save the life of 40 people | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

I just thought the operation sounded awful. The doctors were being asked to do an engineering job when they weren't engineers

(Tal Golesworthy)

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Mr Golesworthy became the first person to benefit from his EARS (external aortic root support) system on May 24 2004 at London's Royal Brompton Hospital.

Nine years after his two-hour operation his aorta has now grown in size and he said his life has been transformed because of it.The sleeve's are created using scans of the individual patient's aorta and computer-assisted drawing to produce a bespoke device.

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Accidental discovery again, memory shape polymers for biomedical use

Accidental discovery again, memory shape polymers for biomedical use | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —Mechanical Engineering Professor Lih-Sheng (Tom) Turng has a simple office demonstration of how shape-memory polymers work.
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

"We want to focus on medical applications, with the goal of converting a medical device or surgical implant into a very compact form, making it as non-invasive as possible," Turng says.

The research team uses inexpensive polymer materials commonly used in injection molding environments. The key is combining a mix of polymers with both brittle and elastic properties. The mix used here is amorphous polylactic acid (PLA), derived from corn starch, and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), a stretch plastic commonly found in athletic apparel.

The shape-memory discovery actually occurred by accident, says Mi, who was originally testing whether the material was biocompatible and able to support cell growth. He found that while the material is easily deformed, with a little heat it almost immediately retained its shape. "Right now, we're looking for the best combination of materials that will bring down the transition temperature," he says.



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-11-smart-medical-material-aims-unfurl.html#jCp

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Car Mechanic Dreams Up a Tool to Ease Births

Car Mechanic Dreams Up a Tool to Ease Births | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
An Argentine car mechanic adapted a method to retrieve a cork from a wine bottle to develop a device that could be used to save a baby stuck in the birth canal.
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

According to Dr. Mario Merialdi, the W.H.O.’s chief coordinator for improving maternal and perinatal health, about 10 percent of the 137 million births worldwide each year have potentially serious complications. About 5.6 million babies are stillborn or die quickly, and about 260,000 women die in childbirth. Obstructed labor, which can occur when a baby’s head is too large or an exhausted mother’s contractions stop, is a major factor.

In wealthy countries, fetal distress results in a rush to the operating room. In poor, rural clinics, Dr. Merialdi said, “if the baby doesn’t come out, the woman is on her own.”

The current options in those cases are forceps — large, rounded pliers — or suction cups attached to the baby’s scalp. In untrained hands, either can cause hemorrhages, crush the baby’s head or twist its spine.

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Genetically engineered T-cells for cancer cell therapy

Genetically engineered T-cells for cancer cell therapy | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

Developments in genetic engineering make it possible to 're-programme' the human immune system so that T cells - white blood cells that normally fight viruses - recognize and kill cancer cells. This approach, which directly harnesses the potency of the immune system, holds the prospect of a powerful new weapon in the fight against cancer.


Via Ella Buzhor
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Wonderful indeed. They refer to this as "Chimeric antigen"

This means teching the system to fight in a different war, with better weapons, agains an old insidious enemy.

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Ella Buzhor's curator insight, November 16, 2013 2:54 AM

T cells are re-programmed by synthetic genes, which encode a 'chimeric antigen receptor', a chemical hook that makes those T cells to target the cancerous cells. This therapy shows a great promise for blood cancers treatment, and expected to be expanded for the treatment of infectious diseases and GvHD as well.  

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Surgeons describe new ligament in the human knee – KU Leuven

Surgeons describe new ligament in the human knee – KU Leuven | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Two knee surgeons at University Hospitals Leuven have provided the first full anatomical description of a previously enigmatic ligament in the human knee.
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

I can't believe that there are unknown "big" things still hidden for anatomists now we are in the days of molecular medicine. 

Link to the journal:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/joa.12087/abstract

 

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Nanostim™: world’s first and only commercially available leadless pacemaker

Nanostim™:  world’s first and only commercially available leadless pacemaker | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

http://www.sjm.com/

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Great way to avoid infection: No connections with exterior devices.

It has been a good amount of money.

 

Implant  procedure takes only 28 minutes.

 

 This transaction results from St. Jude Medical’s exercise of its exclusive option under those agreements. Under the terms of a merger agreement entered into between the parties, St. Jude Medical paid $123.5 million to Nanostim shareholders at the closing of the transaction. The merger agreement also provides for additional cash payments of up to $65 million, which are contingent upon both the achievement and timing of certain revenue-based milestones.

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Nanoscopic observations of the performance of healthy and osteoporotic bones

Nanoscopic observations of the performance of healthy and osteoporotic bones | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Nanoscopic observations of the performance of healthy and osteoporotic bones
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

The structural integrity and mechanical performance of cortical bone can be obtained from understanding of the feature, arrangement, movement, distortion, and fracture of inorganic hydroxyapatite nanocrystals located within an organic matrix.

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Breakthrough: A man controls robotic leg using thoughts alone

A man missing his lower leg has gained precise control over a prosthetic limb, just by thinking about moving it – all because his unused nerves were preserved during the amputation and rerouted to his thigh where they can be used to communicate with a robotic leg.

 

The man can now seamlessly switch from walking on level ground to climbing stairs and can even kick a football around.

 

During a traditional limb amputation, the main sensory nerves are severed and lose their function. In 2006, Todd Kuiken and his colleagues at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago in Illinois realised they could preserve some of that functionality by carefully rerouting sensory nerves during an amputation and attaching them to another part of the body.

They could then use the rerouted nerve signals to control a robotic limb, allowing a person to control their prosthesis with the same nerves they originally used to control their real limb.

 

Kuiken's team first attempted the procedure – which is called targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) – on people who were having their arm amputated. Now, Kuiken's team has performed TMR for the first time on a man with a leg amputation.

 

First, the team rerouted the two main branches of the man's sciatic nerve to muscles in the thigh above the amputation. One branch controls the calf and some foot muscles, the other controls the muscle running down the outside leg and some more foot muscles.

 

After a few months, the man could control his thigh muscles by thinking about using his missing leg. The next step was to link up a prosthesis.

 

The robot leg in question is a sophisticated prosthesis: it carries a number of mechanical sensors including gyroscopes and accelerometers, and can be trained to use the information from these sensors to perform certain walking styles. Kuiken's team reckoned that the leg would perform even better if it could infer the user's intended walking style with information from the sciatic nerve.

 

To do so, the researchers asked their volunteer to attempt to perform certain movements with his missing leg – for instance, flexing the foot – while they monitored the pattern of electric signals from the rerouted nerves in the thigh muscles. The researchers then programmed the robot leg to flex its foot whenever it detected that particular pattern of electrical activity.

 

Using just the mechanical sensor data, the robotic leg made the correct movement about 87 per cent of the time. With additional data from the nerves, the success rate rose to 98 per cent, and there were no so-called critical errors – errors that increase the risk of the user losing balance and falling. Those kinds of errors are most common when the user suddenly shifts walking style – when they begin to climb stairs, for instance, but with the additional information from the nerves, the robotic leg can make a seamless, natural transition between walking styles (see video).


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Carlos Garcia Pando's comment, September 27, 2013 12:11 AM
Great idea. Thanks for posting
Madison Punch's comment, April 13, 11:51 AM
Aha, where psychology meets physiology. I think this is amazing and definitely the best way for prosthetic limb users to activate their faux leg/arm/etc. Very cool!
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Blood pressure cuff may save lives in patients with acute heart attack

Blood pressure cuff may save lives in patients with acute heart attack | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Done in the ambulance, this simple and safe intervention has potential to reduce mortality after acute myocardial infarction, shows research from Aarhus University Hospital and Aarhus Universit.
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

So, it seems the acute pain in someone's left arm prior to and during  a heart attack is not only a symptom but a self-assisitng protective mechanism.


Activating the body's defense mechanism

Lack of oxygen for short periods of time in a distant organ by intermittently stopping blood flow to a limb, can protect another organ (i.e., the heart), during a prolonged period of lack of oxygen as it is the case during a heart attack. Professor Hans Erik Bøtker and his research team have previously demonstrated that remote ischemic conditioning reduces cardiac tissue damage on average 30% in patients undergoing acute balloon treatment for a heart attack. In patients treated with conditioning, a blood pressure cuff was placed around the upper arm and inflated to 200 mmHg for 5 minutes to cut off blood flow, and then released. The arm then rested for 5 minutes, and then the blood pressure cuff was re-applied. This procedure was repeated 4 times.

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Lift Labs

Lift Labs | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

Lift Labs has developed Liftware technology: a patented innovation that stabilizes tremor from Essential Tremor and Parkinson's Disease to allow you to eat comfortably again. Liftware will be available for purchase in September 2013.

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Although this is not at curative it might change the quality of life and social life of those suffering from this ailments.

 

Liftware is the most practical and effective assistive device for people living with Essential Tremor, Parkinson's, or other disorders. With Liftware, a spoon attachment is kept steady using our innovative Active Cancellation of Tremor technology. The Liftware device will be compatible with other attachments currently in development. The Liftware Spoon will be available in September 2013.

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Penn: Protein That Protects Nucleus Also Regulates Stem Cell Differentiation

Penn: Protein That Protects Nucleus Also Regulates Stem Cell Differentiation | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

The human body has hundreds of different cell types, all with the same basic DNA, and all of which can ultimately be traced back to identical stem cells. Despite this fundamental similarity, a bone cell has little in common with a brain cell when it comes to appearance or function. The fact that bone is rigid and mechanically distinct from soft fat or brain had been speculated to play some role in differentiation to new cells in those parts of the body, but mechanisms have been unclear.

Now, a study by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have shown that a protein found in the nuclei of all cells — lamin-A — plays a key role in the differentiation process.


Via Jacob Blumenthal
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Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, September 3, 2013 12:31 PM

A new study, published in Science magazine,  describes a new role for lamin-A protein in the differentiation process of stem cells. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania found that levels of lamin-A varied between cell types of both human and mose tissues. For example, cells derived from bone, contain 30 times higher levels of lamin-A, as compared to cells derived from the brain. They also showed that  higher levels of lamin-A were correlated with greater protection of DNA and with added rigidity. Interestingly, when they silenced lamin-A by RNA interference in differentiating stem cells, they were able to repress or to alter the differentiation process.

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/341/6149/1240104.full


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To learn more about the lamin-A gene, LMNA:

http://www.genecards.org/cgi-bin/carddisp.pl?gene=LMNA&search=LAMIN


Explore lamin-A related diseases:

http://www.malacards.org/search/by_symbol/LMNA

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Both wearing prosthetic flippers, boy and dolphin swim and bond

Both wearing prosthetic flippers, boy and dolphin swim and bond | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
CLEARWATER — Cieran Kelso sat quietly beside Winter, gently stroking the dolphin's back as a trainer slid a liner, then Winter's famed prosthetic tail, over her stump and secured it with a strap.The 8-year-old boy could relate.
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Nice story. Video included. And also this one:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=kQOEsPBmdNY ;

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