Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING
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Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING
INNOVATION from every field that can be applied to human health.
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Rescooped by Carlos Garcia Pando from Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering
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Stem cells for treatment of ALS at Mayo Clinic - YouTube

Researchers in the Center for Regenerative Medicine are studying the use of intraspinal deliver of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to the cerebral spinal fluid...

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Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, March 9, 2014 1:11 AM

This is a nice movie illustrating the process of isolation and transplantation of growth factor secreting-mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), currently being held at the Mayo Clinic.

Join my Facebook group for more stem cells news and updates:

 https://www.facebook.com/groups/STEMCELLSNET/

 

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Treatment of phantom limb pain based on augmented reality and gaming

Treatment of phantom limb pain based on augmented reality and gaming | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

Phantom limb pain (PLP) is a common and deteriorating condition suffered by ~70% of amputees. In recent years, virtual reality (VR) has been used to treat PLP as a more technologically sophisticated version of the well-known “mirror” therapy introduced in 1996. VR has clear advantages over the physical constraints imposed by the conventional mirror box, as it allows a wider range of motion and rehabilitation exercises. In addition, VR allows interactive games that challenge patients with varying levels of difficulty, while keeping them entertained and motivated

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Rescooped by Carlos Garcia Pando from 3D_Materials journal
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Harvard scientists 3D bioprint layered tissue with blood vessels

Harvard scientists 3D bioprint layered tissue with blood vessels | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Scientists at the Harvard Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering announced Wednesday that they have printed intricately patterned 3D tissue constructs with multiple types of cells and tiny blood vessels.

Via 3D-Materials
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Is zinc the missing link for osteoarthritis therapies?

Is zinc the missing link for osteoarthritis therapies? | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Osteoarthritis is a leading cause of disability, characterized by the destruction of cartilage tissue in joints, but there is a lack of effective therapies because the underlying molecular causes have been unclear. A study published by Cell Press February 13th in the journal Cell reveals that osteoarthritis-related ...
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

"Our findings suggest that local depletion of zinc or pharmacological inhibition of ZIP8 function or MTF1 activity in cartilage tissue would be effective therapeutic approaches for the treatment of osteoarthritis," Chun says. "We are hopeful that this research will lead to the discovery and rapid development of novel drugs to suppress the progression of this debilitating disease."

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FDA: Center for Devices and Radiological Health Strategic Planning > CDRH 2014 Strategic Priorities

Strengthen the Clinical Trial Enterprise

Goal: Improve the efficiency, consistency, and predictability of the IDE process to reduce the time and number of cycles needed to reach appropriate IDE full approval for medical devices, in general, and for devices of public health importance, in particular.

Goal: Increase the number of early feasibility/first-in-human IDE studies submitted to FDA and conducted in the U.S.Strike the Right Balance Between Premarket and Postmarket Data Collection

Goal: Assure the appropriate balance between premarket and postmarket data requirements to facilitate and expedite the development and review of medical devices, in particular high-risk devices of public health importance.Provide Excellent Customer Service

Goal: Provide excellent customer service.

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Targets:

IDE Cycles

+    By September 30, 2014, reduce the number of IDEs requiring more than two cycles to an appropriate full approval decision by 25 percent compared to FY 2013 performance.*

+    By September 30, 2014, for disapproved IDEs, offer all sponsors a teleconference or in-person meeting to occur within 10 business days of the IDE decision.

+    By June 30, 2015, reduce the number of IDEs requiring more than two cycles to an appropriate full approval decision by 50 percent compared to FY 2013 performance.*

 

Time to IDE Approval

+    By September 30, 2014, reduce the overall median time to appropriate full IDE approval by 25 percent compared to FY 2013 performance.*

+    By June 30, 2015, reduce the overall median time to full appropriate IDE approval to 30 days.

 

 

* In FY 2013 (as of 12/11/2013),  45% of IDEs received a full approval decision within 2 cycles and median time to full IDE approval was 174 days.

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Health necessity is the mother of this invention

Health necessity is the mother of this invention | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

One common condition that affects almost one in four Australian women is pelvic organ prolapse. It most often occurs as a result of childbirth when one or more organs descend from where they should be. The early stages can sometimes go unnoticed, but later symptoms include incontinence and sexual dysfunction

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

CSIRO teamed up with researchers from Monash University to develop a new and improved mesh. It will have better mechanical properties, with the addition of stem cells to speed up tissue repair and treat the condition more effectively.


“Current mesh implants are problematic because they haven’t been designed for this purpose. They are rigid like a piece of cardboard when really they need to be flexible to move with the surrounding tissue,” says CSIRO textiles expert, Dr Sharon Edwards.

 

“This can cause women a range of issues including pain, discomfort, fibrosis and erosion, and in some cases further surgery is required.”

The team is investigating the use of a different polymer and warp knit pattern to fabricate a mesh that’s lightweight, elastic and porous.

“Our aim is to increase comfort, reduce the likelihood of complications and create better long-term health outcomes,” says Dr Edwards.

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Turnkey=Survival

By providing more know-how, implant manufacturers can ensure their position in the supply chain.
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

implant designers can eliminate the possibility of coating failure by using an engineered surface porosity, where the bone in-growth cellular reticulation is designed into the computer-aided design (CAD) model of the implant and built up in the additive manufacturing process, along with the structural part of the implant.
It virtually is impossible for the engineered surface porosity to become detached. Implant designers also have full control over reticulation size, shape, and depth. By controlling the cell structure with CAD, they can design a repeated, random, or even multimodal reticulation where the porosity changes depending on location or depth.

“The implant designer has control over how much osseointegration occurs and where it occurs,” said Collins. “Engineered surface porosity using additive manufacturing has been demonstrated on a number of different alloys, including Ti 6-4 and F75. There are several hip manufacturers in Italy using this process and the FDA has recently approved an additively manufactured device in the U.S. This should pave the way for more use of ESP for both knees and hips.”

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Smith & Nephew acquires ArthroCare for $1.7 billion

Smith & Nephew acquires ArthroCare for $1.7 billion | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

 Smith&Nephew today announces the execution of a definitive agreement to acquire medical device company ArthroCare Corp. for $48.25 per ArthroCare share in cash, a total consideration of approximately $1.7 billion and an enterprise value of $1.5 billion.

 

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Antibiotic ‘Smart Bomb’ Can Target Specific Strains of Bacteria and let the rest live in peace

Antibiotic ‘Smart Bomb’ Can Target Specific Strains of Bacteria and let the rest live in peace | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

Researchers from NC State University have developed a technique to selectively remove specific strains of bacteria. It is a de facto antibiotic “smart bomb” that can identify specific strains of bacteria and sever their DNA, eliminating the infection. The technique offers a potential approach to treat infections by multi-drug resistant bacteria.

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

The researchers tested the approach in controlled cultures with different combinations of bacteria present, and were able to eliminate only the targeted strain. “For example, we were able to eliminate Salmonella in a culture without affecting good bacteria normally found in the digestive tract,” Dr. Chase Beisel says.

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Stanford Students Develop a Cheap Fix for Clubfoot

Stanford Students Develop a Cheap Fix for Clubfoot | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
> Traditional clubfoot correcting braces can cost between $300-700 and be pretty ugly, even scary looking devices, but not anymore. Jeff Yang and Ian Conn
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Great design job. Great story to watch in the video.

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Realview: medical holography

Realview: medical holography | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

The quality and viewing experience of the recorded holographic clips is incomparably lower than watching the actual holograms on the RealView Clinical Beta System. Among others, this is due to inherent limitations of filming holograms using a single-lens camera (mimicking a viewer looking with one eye only) and presenting these volumetric 3D images on your 2D screen. In order to fully enjoy and appreciate a hologram one must use both eyes and look at a true hologram

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

RealView Imaging Ltd, an Israeli start-up company, is introducing the world’s first 3D holographic display and interface system, initially for medical imaging applications. The company’s proprietary technology projects hyper-realistic, dynamic 3D holographic images “floating in the air” without the need for any type of eyewear or a conventional 2D screen. The projected 3D volumes appear in free space, allowing the user to literally touch and interact precisely within the image, presenting a unique and proprietary breakthrough in digital holography and real-time 3D interaction capabilities.

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New Coating Technology Could Prevent Premature Orthopedic Implant Failure

New Coating Technology Could Prevent Premature Orthopedic Implant Failure | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Nanoscale films developed at MIT promote bone growth, creating a stronger seal between implants and patients’ own bone.
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

An apparently a better way to coat implants with hidroxyapatite and grwth factors

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3D Systems at CES 2014

55 minutes video explaining all sectors of 3DS involment in consumer and prosumer market

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Read this article from  Peter Way 

http://3dprintingtimes.com/3d-systems-ces/#!


"3D Systems is talking about complete solutions, not hardware.  They are positioning and branding a range of products for specific customer segments.  They talk of what customers can do with the products —  the valuable output, and why they should be appealing rather than speeds and feeds.  This is likely to bring them success in areas where customers actually agree.  Products are being presented with the software and input devices that are needed to make the process of printing easy.  Naturally, it is too early to tell how well it will all work together, but ease of use is extremely important in getting end-user adoption."


Andy Jeffrey (06:44)  presents the ceramic printing as a new 3DS product, formerly by FIGULO.

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Cell Stem Cell - Therapeutic Translation of iPSCs for Treating Neurological Disease


Via Jacob Blumenthal
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Absolutly fantastic. 

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Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, March 7, 2014 6:18 AM

This review, published on June 2013 discuss the importance of reprogramming technology for modeling and treating neurological and psychiatric diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, autism and schizophrenia. The review is free, and part of the "Feature Five" review collection of Cell Stem Cell journal.
-- To learn more about stem cells, regenerative medicine and developmental biology visit:  http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/

 

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Scientists from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) show Molecular Evidence for the Inverse Comorbidity between Central Nervous System Disorders and Cancer

Scientists from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) show Molecular Evidence for the Inverse Comorbidity between Central Nervous System Disorders and Cancer | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
A  lower-than-expected probability of developing certain types of Cancer has been observed in patients with CNS disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or Schizophrenia. Understanding such a protective effect could be the key to finding novel treatments for both types of conditions, for instance thanks to drug repurposing.
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

The authors identified almost a hundred genes that could be responsible for inverse the relationship between these diseases: 74 genes, which were less active in nervous system diseases, were found to be more active in cancer; on the other hand, 19 genes, which were more active in nervous system diseases, were found to be less active in cancer.

“It is precisely these genes, which are inversely activated, that could
explain the lower risk of cancer in patients with nervous system diseases,” said the authors of the study.

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New type of nanoparticle could improve the antimicrobial coating of implants

New type of nanoparticle could improve the antimicrobial coating of implants | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

A research group, led by Katharina Fromm of the University of Fribourg, has developed a new antimicrobial coating. It is currently undergoing in-vivo tests in a project funded by the CTI. This coating continually emits an antimicrobial agent - silver ions - for the duration of approximately three months after surgery.

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

To prolong the efficiency of the coating, the researchers are currently working on a second-generation coating in which the silver nanoparticle would be encapsulated in silica. This would enhance the stability of the nanoparticle by isolating it from its environment. It would also slow down the diffusion of the silver and prolong the efficiency of the coat-ing. Another advantage of this method is that cells can tolerate a much greater number of silver nanoparticles if they are encapsulated than if they are naked.

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XStat treats bullet wounds with tiny injectable sponges

XStat treats bullet wounds with tiny injectable sponges | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

Uncontrolled hemorrhage (bleeding out) is responsible for 80 percent of combat deaths – people die because we can't plug a simple hole. 

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

The sponges expand in the wound to fill the cavity, and apply enough pressure to stop arterial bleeding. They adhere to wet surfaces, which counters any tendency for the pressure to push the packing out of the wound. In most cases, an arterial wound treated using XStat stops bleeding within about 15 seconds. XStat is currently awaiting FDA approval, bolstered by a request from the US Army for expedited consideration.

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Bioprinting cartilage into people is doctor's goal

Bioprinting cartilage into people is doctor's goal | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Dr. Darryl D'Lima of Scripps Clinic plans to bioprint cartilage inside the knee.
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Meaning the printing would take place directly onto existing bone or damaged cartilage, in open air, under anesthesia. I don't see it as a close future application, although printing hip or knee cartilage on demand and then placing them in the patients body should be possible.

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3D printed hip puts teenager back on her feet

3D printed hip puts teenager back on her feet | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
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Carlos Garcia Pando's curator insight, February 9, 2014 5:14 AM

Nice explanation of the whole process

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New method to restore skull after brain surgery appears to reduce complication rates

Johns Hopkins surgeons report they have devised a better, safer method to replace bone removed from the skull after lifesaving brain surgery. The new technique, they say, appears to result in fewer complications than standard restoration, which has changed little since its development in the 1890s.
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Everyone has been taught for 120 years to completely peel up the scalp,” says study leader Chad R. Gordon, D.O. In the new approach, surgeons pull back only the top three layers of the five-layer scalp, thereby sandwiching the bone or implant in between. The researchers say this innovation not only prevents brain injury, but also reduces infection risk by providing the delicate bone or implant access to blood supply in the scalp from both the top and the bottom. “But by not disturbing the brain, we get much better outcomes. This is a safer, simpler way to do a very complex surgery.”

 

Ideally, surgeons restore the skull with the same piece of bone removed during the original operation, which is stored in a freezer between operations. In some cases, surgeons must substitute the original bone with a custom-made implant made of an organic compound called methyl methacrylate, which has been used safely since the 1960s

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Alexis Gdovic's curator insight, March 25, 2014 8:12 AM

A3

Alexis Gdovic's comment, March 27, 2014 8:02 AM
Surgeons from John Hopkins have come up with a new way of replacing bone in the skull after having brain surgery. It is more successful and less risky than before. Where before, the patient would need to get 2 surgeries because of scarring and faulty protective coverings, now they only need 1 operation. "Traditionally, surgeons have peeled the scalp off the brain to then tuck the skull bone or custom implant back into place, a practice which puts the patient at risk of bleeding, seizure, stroke and infection. In some cases, the replaced bone or implant must again be removed." Now, they simply peel back only 3 of the 5 layers of the scalp.
Alexis Gdovic's comment, March 27, 2014 8:06 AM
This new method reduces risk of infection, as well as preventing a higher injury. It is "safer" and easier. Though when experimenting through 50 patients, only 1 had a cranial issue, which caused them to preform a second surgery anyway although it still limited the amount of blood lost.
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Andor Luca-R camera sheds light on Oral Cancer

Andor Luca-R camera sheds light on Oral Cancer | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

Diffuse Reflectance Imaging validated for early non-invasive detection of malignant and pre-malignant tumours

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

A team of Indian cancer researchers led by Dr Narayanan Subhash has developed a simple, non-invasive spectral imaging system that holds out the possibility of rapid, inexpensive mass screening for oral cancers in dental and clinical settings. Even in the hands of non-clinical staff, it is capable of real-time discrimination of healthy oral tissue from pre-malignant and malignant tissues with accuracy comparable to the gold standard histopathology of a biopsy sample.


link to the paper (free)

http://www.researchgate.net/publication/51737096_Diffuse_reflectance_spectroscopy_diagnostic_accuracy_of_a_non-invasive_screening_technique_for_early_detection_of_malignant_changes_in_the_oral_cavity

 

and also

http://www.researchgate.net/publication/237058467_Diagnostic_accuracy_of_diffuse_reflectance_imaging_for_early_detection_of_pre-malignant_and_malignant_changes_in_the_oral_cavity_a_feasibility_study



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Researchers Developing New Approach for Imaging Dense Breasts for Abnormalities

Researchers Developing New Approach for Imaging Dense Breasts for Abnormalities | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

Combined MRI/NIRS may benefit women whose mammogram showed an abnormality and requires further testing to rule out cancer.

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

An MRI/NIRS may offer specific advantages to women with dense breasts, who are more likely to develop and die from breast cancer. A dense breast is harder for a radiologist to "see through" when using traditional imaging equipment, which lacks the sensitivity to penetrate the dense tissue. Standard breast screening is effective 77-97 percent of the time in a normal breast, but when a breast is dense precision falls to 63-89 percent.

 

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Bio-Inspired Robotic Device Could Aid Ankle-Foot Rehabilitation

Bio-Inspired Robotic Device Could Aid Ankle-Foot Rehabilitation | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

A soft, wearable device that mimics the muscles, tendons and ligaments of the lower leg could aid in the rehabilitation of patients with ankle-foot disorders such as drop foot

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

http://youtu.be/IbXRiTbuDvY

 

While our own ankle is naturally capable of a complicated three-dimensional motion, most rigid exoskeletons allow only a single pivot point, thus limiting the natural degrees of freedom of the joint.

Active, powered devices can improve function and also help re-educate the neuromuscular system, but within this limitation.
The soft orthotic device, by contrast, enabled the researchers to mimic the biological structure of the lower leg. The device's artificial tendons were attached to four PAMs, which correspond with three muscles in the foreleg and one in the back that control ankle motion. The prototype was capable of generating an ankle range of sagittal motion of 27 degrees - sufficient for a normal walking gait.

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Live 3D Organ Holograms Give an Unprecedented View to Surgeons (singularityweblog.com)

Live 3D Organ Holograms Give an Unprecedented View to Surgeons (singularityweblog.com) | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

An Israeli firm has developed 3D holographic imaging technology that allows doctors to see a patient’s anatomy ”floating” in mid-air during real time medical procedures. The company says successful trials of its system demonstrate that science fiction has become science fact.


Via Belinda Suvaal
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Knee Surgery Not an Effective Fix for Joint Pain, Study Claims

Knee Surgery Not an Effective Fix for Joint Pain, Study Claims | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Arthroscopic surgery on the meniscus is the most common orthopedic procedure in the United States, performed roughly 700,000 times annually at an estimated cost of $4 billion.

This study added to other recent research suggesting that meniscal surgery should be aimed at a narrower group of patients; that for many, options like physical therapy may be as good.

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