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Bespoke Innovations makes your current prostheses look much better

Bespoke Innovations makes your current prostheses look much better | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
They design, scan and print FAIRINGS which are CUSTOMIZED. Fairings are designed for, and with, the amputee.

"The wearer is invited to choose from a library of patterns and graphics, or add custom text. They may choose a specific finish, such as ballistic nylon, leather or mirror-polished metal for a dazzling effect. Tattoos can even be laser-etched into leather or embossed into the polymer surface for a sculpted look. This represents the opposite of 'one-size-fits-all'

 

Fairings are MODULAR, DURABLE, and LIGHTWEIGHT.

 

These impresive covers create a self-confidence experience, A positive experience helpintg erase the wall of awkwardness that can disconnect the amputee from the world around.

 

Don't miss the impressive gallery at 

http://www.bespokeinnovations.com/content/gallery

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Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING
INNOVATION from every field that can be applied to human health.
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Scientists engineer toxin-secreting stem cells to treat brain tumors

Scientists engineer toxin-secreting stem cells to treat brain tumors | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Proof-of-concept study highlights new therapeutic use of engineered human stem cells
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

“A few years ago we recognized that stem cells could be used to continuously deliver these therapeutic toxins to tumors in the brain, but first we needed to genetically engineer stem cells that could resist being killed themselves by the toxins,” he said. “Now, we have toxin-resistant stem cells that can make and release cancer-killing drugs.”

Cytotoxins are deadly to all cells, but since the late 1990s, researchers have been able to tag toxins in such a way that they only enter cancer cells with specific surface molecules; making it possible to get a toxin into a cancer cell without posing a risk to normal cells. Once inside of a cell, the toxin disrupts the cell’s ability to make proteins and, within days, the cell starts to die.

Shah next plans to rationally combine the toxin-secreting stem cells with a number of different therapeutic stem cells developed by his team to further enhance their positive results in mouse models of glioblastoma, the most common brain tumor in human adults.

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UCL research helps paralysed man to recover function

UCL research helps paralysed man to recover function | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

A man who was paralysed from the chest down following a knife attack can now walk using a frame, following a pioneering cell transplantation treatment developed by scientists at UCL and applied by surgeons at Wroclaw University Hospital, Poland.

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Professor Geoff Raisman, Chair of Neural Regeneration at the UCL Institute of Neurology. "I believe we stand on the threshold of a historic advance and that the continuation of our work will be of major benefit to mankind. I believe we have now opened the door to a treatment of spinal cord injury that will get patients out of wheel chairs. Our goal now is to develop this first procedure to a point where it can be rolled out as a worldwide general approach."

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FHC Switches to EOS Technology for Manufacturing of Stereotactic Platforms for Neurosurgery

FHC Switches to EOS Technology for Manufacturing of Stereotactic Platforms for Neurosurgery | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
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Israelis have developed a groundbreaking method for EEG

Israelis have developed a groundbreaking method for EEG | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
קבוצה של חוקרים ממכון ויצמן מצאה דרך לסרוק את המוח ברזולוציה טובה מזו של הסורקים הקיימים וללא חשיפה לקרינה: "כל מי שעוסק בתחום נפל מהכסא"
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

 A group of Israeli researchers has developed a new method to scan brain  functions that enables high resolution, no radiation exposure. The method, developed at the Weizmann Institute in Rehovot, was successfully tested in mice and rats and the findings were published late last week in the journal Nature - Scientific Reports.

Scanning of brain activity is usually done using functional magnetic resonance imaging apparatus (fMRI). The new method, called TOVI) Transcranial optical vascular imaging), is a combination of two technologies: one - knows how to shoot a fluorescent microscope contrast of blood vessels in the brain after the animal was injected fluorescent material, and the second - a laser beam that allows complete picture of vascular brain.

"Combined tools we get a picture through the skull to the level of capillaries - the tiniest blood vessels, and better resolution scanning devices exist. Exceptional image received. Nobody messes in this area did not fall off the chair after seeing the products," said psychiatrist Dr. David Israel , Director, Department of Psychiatric Mental Health Center Jerusalem, Ministry of Health, which deals with the study of brain imaging and signed article with Prof. Alon Harmelin, Dr. Vyacheslav Kltz'nko and Dr. Yuri Kuznetsov Faculty of Biology at the Weizmann Institute.

After injecting material such as a camera for a time (in this case 50 milli - seconds) the activity of the brain blood vessels and produces real-time video effect. Beyond the benefits like resolution and reducing the use of radiation, the researchers say the ease of use of the system, especially when it comes to clinical applications.

"In fact, each of these technologies exist separately, but the integration between them has been giving a new dimension to scan the brain. Microscope fluorescent exists today and gives a picture of filling cerebrovascular using material response fluorescent injected to the patient. Scanning laser works on the principle of reflectance based on the level different traffic density and blood vessels, "explains Professor Hermelin Weizmann Institute. "The ability to integrate both allows to see the perpetrator or get an overview of the process of rehabilitation of the patient after the event brain such as stroke, for example, means a relatively simple and inexpensive. Is probably not constitute a complete replacement device fMRI, but it will allow the attending physician to watch on your PC his patient's condition in near real time, within a few seconds by the process in the brain. "    

However, the development is still incomplete and requires more development work. Technology to provide a good picture of the brain, researchers require at this stage still peel the skin layer of the mice to reach the skull itself. Problem thickness through which the camera is required to penetrate is the next challenge researchers and believe, they are the solution. "We're trying to develop the system so that you can see brain activity in mice without the need to peel off the skins. Thickness restriction will be solved as soon as we talk about the application of this method also works in humans, their skull bone thicker than that of mice.'s What we're working right now," said Israeli.According to him, the system itself is already being implemented in research animals in search of drugs and monitoring of brain stimulatio

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Stryker acquires Small Bone Innovations INC

Stryker acquires Small Bone Innovations INC | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

Stryker Corporation (NYSE:SYK) announced today a definitive agreement to acquire assets of Small Bone Innovations, Inc. ("SBi") in an all cash transaction for up to $375 million.

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Founded in 2004, SBi is a privately held business headquartered in Morrisville, Pennsylvania with facilities in France and Germany. SBi products are designed and promoted for upper and lower extremity small bone indications, with a focus on small joint replacement.

The assets to be acquired include the Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement System (STAR Ankle). The STAR Ankle, sold globally in over 40 countries, is the only PMA approved, cementless, three-piece total ankle replacement system and is the most published total ankle replacement product in the world. With the addition of the STAR Ankle to the Stryker Foot & Ankle product portfolio, Stryker comprehensively addresses the broad range of foot and ankle procedures. Additional assets include finger, wrist, and elbow products, further expanding the existing Stryker upper extremity product offerings. The sales of the acquired products were approximately $48 million in 2013.

 

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ReWalk™ Personal Exoskeleton System Cleared by FDA for Home Use

ReWalk™ Personal Exoskeleton System Cleared by FDA for Home Use | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

This is great news. First clearance.

Now we need the second clearance: pricing.

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AM Used To Make Woman's Hip Joint.

AM  Used To Make Woman's Hip Joint. | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
A 3D printer gives a 71-year-old woman the ability to walk unassisted following a "game-changing" procedure.
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Although for us this an everyday job, this time the case includes stem cells from the patient to be seeded  to increase the chance of bone growing into the implant.

 

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Zimmer Holdings, Inc. to buy Biomet, Inc. in Transaction Valued at $13.35 Billion

Zimmer Holdings, Inc. to buy Biomet, Inc. in Transaction Valued at $13.35 Billion | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

Zimmer Holdings, Inc. to Combine with Biomet, Inc. in Transaction Valued at $13.35 Billion creates Leading Musculoskeletal Innovator to Shape Solutions for Evolving Healthcare Industry

- Double-Digit Accretion to Zimmer's Adjusted Diluted Earnings Per Share in First Year

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

The merger of Zimmer and Biomet will position the combined company as a leader in the $45 billion musculoskeletal industry and is aligned with Zimmer's strategic framework, which focuses on growth, operational excellence and prudent capital allocation. The combined company is expected to deliver attractive growth by offering a more comprehensive and scalable portfolio of solutions with enhanced cross-selling opportunities. In addition, the combined company is expected to advance innovation to benefit healthcare stakeholders, and stockholders are expected to benefit from a more diversified and predictable revenue mix consistent with the comprehensive portfolio. Upon closing, the transaction is expected to be double-digit accretive to Zimmer's adjusted diluted earnings per share in the first year. Cash flows from operations are expected to increase by 1.5 times Zimmer's stand-alone estimates.

 

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PCAF gives new hope to patients with spinal cord injury

PCAF gives new hope to patients with spinal cord injury | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

Curious as to why nerves of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) show some capacity for regrowth and repair, whereas nerves of the central nervous system (CNS) do not, scientists undertook a study of the PNS’ regenerative mechanisms, the chemical and genetic events that help peripheral nerves recover from injury. These scientists were already aware that damaged peripheral nerves emit “retrograde” signals, which activate an epigenetic program, which in turn initiates nerve growth. But the scientists were dissatisfied with how little was known about how, exactly, retrograde signaling could trigger the epigenetic mechanism.

 

The scientists hoped that if more were understood about the trigger, which works in the PNS, they might learn how it could be made to work in the CNS. Then CNS damage, which is currently irreparable, might become amenable to treatment, and people suffering spinal cord injury, stroke, or brain trauma might avoid loss of sensation or permanent paralysis.

 

Scientists representing Imperial College London and the Hertie Institute, University of Tuebingen compared the responses to PNS damage and CNS damage in a type of neuron called a dorsal root ganglion, which connects to both the PNS and the CNS. (The researchers considered cells in culture as well as mouse models.) Then, through systematic epigenetic studies, they discovered a protein that appears to be essential for a series of chemical and genetic events that allow nerves to regenerate.

 

The details of this work appeared April 1, 2014 in Nature Communications, in an article entitled “PCAF-dependent epigenetic changes promote axonal regeneration in the central nervous system.” As the title indicates, the crucial protein is called PCAF, for the histone acetyltransferase p300/CBP-associated factor. PCAF, the researchers found, “promotes acetylation of histone 3 Lys 9 at the promoters of established key regeneration-associated genes following a peripheral but not a central axonal injury.”

 

When researchers injected PCAF into mice with damage to their central nervous system, this significantly increased the number of nerve fibers that grew back, indicating that it may be possible to chemically control the regeneration of nerves in the CNS.

 

The researchers also found that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-mediated retrograde signaling is required for PCAF-dependent regenerative gene reprogramming. “PCAF,” the authors wrote, “is necessary for conditioning-dependent axonal regeneration and also singularly promotes regeneration after spinal cord injury.”

 

One of the study’s authors, Radhika Puttagunta, Ph.D., from the University of Tuebingen, said, “With this work we add another level of understanding into the specific mechanisms of how the body is able to regenerate in the PNS and have used this knowledge to drive regeneration where it is lacking in the CNS. We believe this will help further our understanding of mechanisms that could enhance regeneration and physical recovery after CNS injury.”

 

“The results suggest that we may be able to target specific chemical changes to enhance the growth of nerves after injury to the central nervous system,” said lead study author Simone Di Giovanni, M.D., Ph.D., from Imperial College London’s Department of Medicine. "The ultimate goal could be to develop a pharmaceutical method to trigger the nerves to grow and repair and to see some level of recovery in patients.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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22 Y.O. received complete 3D Printed Cranium Replacement last December. She's back to work.

22 Y.O. received complete 3D Printed Cranium Replacement last December. She's back to work. | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

"Implants used to be made by hand in the operating theatre using a sort of cement which was far from ideal,’ Verweij said. “Using 3D printing we can make one to the exact size. This not only has great cosmetic advantages, but patients’ brain function often recovers better than using the old method.”

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Carlos Garcia Pando's curator insight, March 26, 11:52 AM

The 23 hour operation was performed by neurologist Bon Verweij, surgeon Marvick Muradin, and their highly skilled team.

Carlos Garcia Pando's curator insight, March 31, 5:02 AM

Watching the picture I took for granted that it was some stereolithography material out of an Additive Manufacturing machine. My fault for that.

Going deeper into the story I found no evidence of the use of Additive technology to manufacture the implant. Apparently it has gone through the everyday routine of:

*   CAT and computer 3D model 

*   Some design

*   Stereolithography for a 3D model

*   Using the model as a Master to produce a silicone rubber (or other materials) mould

*   Casting or injecting some liquid PMMA

So apparently this is not such a "FIRST IN THE WORLD"

 

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Stem cells for treatment of ALS at Mayo Clinic - YouTube

Researchers in the Center for Regenerative Medicine are studying the use of intraspinal deliver of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to the cerebral spinal fluid...

Via Jacob Blumenthal
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Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, March 9, 1:11 AM

This is a nice movie illustrating the process of isolation and transplantation of growth factor secreting-mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), currently being held at the Mayo Clinic.

Join my Facebook group for more stem cells news and updates:

 https://www.facebook.com/groups/STEMCELLSNET/

 

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Treatment of phantom limb pain based on augmented reality and gaming

Treatment of phantom limb pain based on augmented reality and gaming | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

Phantom limb pain (PLP) is a common and deteriorating condition suffered by ~70% of amputees. In recent years, virtual reality (VR) has been used to treat PLP as a more technologically sophisticated version of the well-known “mirror” therapy introduced in 1996. VR has clear advantages over the physical constraints imposed by the conventional mirror box, as it allows a wider range of motion and rehabilitation exercises. In addition, VR allows interactive games that challenge patients with varying levels of difficulty, while keeping them entertained and motivated

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Harvard scientists 3D bioprint layered tissue with blood vessels

Harvard scientists 3D bioprint layered tissue with blood vessels | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Scientists at the Harvard Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering announced Wednesday that they have printed intricately patterned 3D tissue constructs with multiple types of cells and tiny blood vessels.

Via 3D-Materials
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Victor Chang : Media Releases Archives - Victor Chang Media Detail WORLD FIRST HEART TRANSPLANT

Victor Chang : Media Releases Archives - Victor Chang Media Detail WORLD FIRST HEART TRANSPLANT | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

In a world first, doctors at St Vincent’s Hospital have managed to transplant a heart that had stopped beating. The donor heart wasn’t beating for up to 20 minutes before it was resuscitated and successfully transplanted.

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

n a world first, doctors at St Vincent’s Hospital have managed to transplant a heart that had stopped beating.

The donor heart wasn’t beating for up to 20 minutes before it was resuscitated and successfully transplanted.

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Rapid whole-brain imaging with single cell resolution

Rapid whole-brain imaging with single cell resolution | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

A major challenge of systems biology is understanding how phenomena at the cellular scale correlate with activity at the organism level. A concerted effort has been made especially in the brain, as scientists are aiming to clarify how neural activity is translated into consciousness and other complex brain activities.

 

One example of the technologies needed is whole-brain imaging at single-cell resolution. This imaging normally involves preparing a highly transparent sample that minimizes light scattering and then imaging neurons tagged with fluorescent probes at different slices to produce a 3D representation. However, limitations in current methods prevent comprehensive study of the relationship. A new high-throughput method, CUBIC (Clear, Unobstructed Brain Imaging Cocktails and Computational Analysis), published in Cell, is a great leap forward, as it offers unprecedented rapid whole-brain imaging at single cell resolution and a simple protocol to clear up and make the brain sample transparent, is based on the use of amino-alcohols.

 

In combination with light sheet fluorescence microscopy, CUBIC was tested for rapid imaging of a number of mammalian systems, such as mouse and primate, showing its scalability for brains of different size. Additionally, it was used to acquire new spatial-temporal details of gene expression patterns in the hypothalamic circadian rhythm center. Moreover, by combining images taken from opposite directions, CUBIC enables whole brain imaging and direct comparison of brains in different environmental conditions.

 

CUBIC overcomes a number of obstacles compared with previous methods. One is the clearing and transparency protocol, which involves serially immersing fixed tissues into just two reagents for a relatively short time. Second, CUBIC is compatible with many fluorescent probes because of low quenching, which allows for probes with longer wavelengths and reduces concern for scattering when whole brain imaging while at the same time inviting multi-color imaging. Finally, it is highly reproducible and scalable. While other methods have achieved some of these qualities, CUBIC is the first to realize all.

 

CUBIC provides information on previously unattainable 3D gene expression profiles and neural networks at the systems level. Because of its rapid and high-throughput imaging, CUBIC offers extraordinary opportunity to analyze localized effects of genomic editing. It also is expected to identify neural connections at the whole brain level. In fact, last author Hiroki Ueda is optimistic about further application to even larger mammalian systems. “In the near future, we would like to apply CUBIC technology to whole-body imaging at single cell resolution”.


Via Donald J Bolger, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Donald J Bolger's curator insight, August 13, 11:15 AM

This sounds too good to be true!

 

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Young Girl Can Breathe Easy Thanks to the Mimics Innovation Suite | Biomedical Software and Services for Engineering on Anatomy

Young Girl Can Breathe Easy Thanks to the Mimics Innovation Suite | Biomedical Software and Services for Engineering on Anatomy | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
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Exactech Launches New Porous Technology for Total Knee Arthroplasty

 Exactech, Inc., a developer and producer of bone and joint restoration products for hip, knee, shoulder, spine and biologic materials, announced today the international launch of Optetrak Logic® Porous, a new porous technology for total knee arthroplasty.

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

No images yet on their web site

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Real Human Anatomy Data that Anyone Can Annotate

Real Human Anatomy Data that Anyone Can Annotate | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
The Online Anatomical Human is the first of its kind – real anatomical data combining existing knowledge with the ability to add and share new information.
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Prepare to browse with leap motion gesture controller

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New Device Allows Brain To Bypass Spinal Cord, Move Paralyzed Limbs

New Device Allows Brain To Bypass Spinal Cord, Move Paralyzed Limbs | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Ian Burkhart, a 23-year-old quadriplegic from Dublin, Ohio, is the first patient to use Neurobridge, an electronic neural bypass for spinal cord injuries that reconnects the brain directly to muscles, allowing voluntary and functional control of a paralyzed limb. Burkhart is the first of a potential five participants in a clinical study.

“It’s much like a heart bypass, but instead of bypassing blood, we’re actually bypassing electrical signals,” said Chad Bouton, research leader at Battelle. “We’re taking those signals from the brain, going around the injury, and actually going directly to the muscles.”

The Neurobridge technology combines algorithms that learn and decode the user’s brain activity and a high-definition muscle stimulation sleeve that translates neural impulses from the brain and transmits new signals to the paralyzed limb. In this case, Ian’s brain signals bypass his injured spinal cord and move his hand, hence the name Neurobridge.

Burkhart, who was paralyzed four years ago during a diving accident, viewed the opportunity to participate in the six-month, FDA-approved clinical trial at Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center as a chance to help others with spinal cord injuries.

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DARPA's HAPTIX project Seeks to Overcome Physical and Psychological Effects of Upper Limb Loss by Restoring Sense of Touch to Amputees

DARPA's HAPTIX project Seeks to Overcome Physical and Psychological Effects of Upper Limb Loss by Restoring Sense of Touch to Amputees | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

First new program for Biological Technologies Office aims to aid amputees by layering and leaping beyond previous DARPA breakthroughs in prosthetics and neural interfaces 

 

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

HAPTIX aims to achieve its goals by developing interface systems that measure and decode motor signals recorded in peripheral nerves and/or muscles. The program will adapt one of the advanced prosthetic limb systems developed under Revolutionizing Prosthetics to incorporate sensors that provide tactile and proprioceptive feedback to the user, delivered through patterned stimulation of sensory pathways in the peripheral nerve. One of the key challenges will be to identify stimulation patterning strategies that elicit naturalistic sensations of touch and movement. The ultimate goal is to create a fully-implantable device that is safe, reliable, effective, and approved for human use.

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Spinal Stimulation Helps Four Patients with Paraplegia Regain Voluntary Movement

Spinal Stimulation Helps Four Patients with Paraplegia Regain Voluntary Movement | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

Four people with paraplegia are able to voluntarily move previously paralyzed muscles as a result of a novel therapy that involves electrical stimulation of the spinal cord, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health and the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation. The participants, each of whom had been paralyzed for more than two years, were able to voluntarily flex their toes, ankles, and knees while the stimulator was active, and the movements were enhanced over time when combined with physical rehabilitation.

Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

With his stimulator active, Summers was able to gradually bear his own weight and could eventually stand without assistance from physical therapists for up to four minutes. Surprisingly, seven months into the trial, Summers also discovered that he had regained some voluntary control of his legs. The researchers were amazed by this latter outcome, as intentional movement requires information to travel from the brain down to the lower spinal cord, a path that had been rendered nonfunctional by his injury. Other impairments caused by Summers’ injury also began to improve over time, in the absence of stimulation, such as blood pressure control, body temperature regulation, bladder control, and sexual function.

 

Full paper  http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2014/04/07/brain.awu038.full

 

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My fault: Misleading headline again. 22 Y.O. received complete Cranium Replacement CAST ON A MOULD, MADE WITH THE HELP OF A 2d printed MASTER.

My fault: Misleading headline again. 22 Y.O. received complete Cranium Replacement CAST ON A MOULD, MADE WITH THE HELP OF A 2d printed MASTER. | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it

I want to apologize to all my followers for following the hype and not being critical enough before posting. 


Via Carlos Garcia Pando
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Watching the picture I took for granted that it was some stereolithography material out of an Additive Manufacturing machine. My fault for that.

Going deeper into the story I found no evidence of the use of Additive technology to manufacture the implant. Apparently it has gone through the everyday routine of:

*   CAT and computer 3D model 

*   Some design

*   Stereolithography for a 3D model

*   Using the model as a Master to produce a silicone rubber (or other materials) mould

*   Casting or injecting some liquid PMMA

So apparently this is not such a "FIRST IN THE WORLD"

 

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Carlos Garcia Pando's curator insight, March 26, 11:52 AM

The 23 hour operation was performed by neurologist Bon Verweij, surgeon Marvick Muradin, and their highly skilled team.

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Cell Stem Cell - Therapeutic Translation of iPSCs for Treating Neurological Disease


Via Jacob Blumenthal
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

Absolutly fantastic. 

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Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, March 7, 6:18 AM

This review, published on June 2013 discuss the importance of reprogramming technology for modeling and treating neurological and psychiatric diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, autism and schizophrenia. The review is free, and part of the "Feature Five" review collection of Cell Stem Cell journal.
-- To learn more about stem cells, regenerative medicine and developmental biology visit:  http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/

 

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Scientists from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) show Molecular Evidence for the Inverse Comorbidity between Central Nervous System Disorders and Cancer

Scientists from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) show Molecular Evidence for the Inverse Comorbidity between Central Nervous System Disorders and Cancer | Medical Engineering = MEDINEERING | Scoop.it
A  lower-than-expected probability of developing certain types of Cancer has been observed in patients with CNS disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or Schizophrenia. Understanding such a protective effect could be the key to finding novel treatments for both types of conditions, for instance thanks to drug repurposing.
Carlos Garcia Pando's insight:

The authors identified almost a hundred genes that could be responsible for inverse the relationship between these diseases: 74 genes, which were less active in nervous system diseases, were found to be more active in cancer; on the other hand, 19 genes, which were more active in nervous system diseases, were found to be less active in cancer.

“It is precisely these genes, which are inversely activated, that could
explain the lower risk of cancer in patients with nervous system diseases,” said the authors of the study.

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