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AI doctors will become 'as ubiquitous as stethoscopes' (Wired UK)

AI doctors will become 'as ubiquitous as stethoscopes' (Wired UK) | Medical Education | Scoop.it
One of the biggest problems facing doctors isn't patients' injuries or illnesses – it's the sheer quantity data. Most will spend more time going over medical records than actually dealing with their patients.

It's a problem that "AI doctors" could help address, with supercomputers processing information far faster and more efficiently. The problem, IBM's Kyu Rhee tells the crowd at WIRED Health, is trust.

"Studies have shown that if a doctor wears a stethoscope, you trust him or her more. But in 1816, Dr René Laennec, a French physician, was examining his patient, trying to listen to her heart sounds with his ears," said Rhee. "He took 40 pieces of paper, rolled it up, and created the first stethoscope."

Looking to the future, Rhee sees a "cognitive system" such as IBM's Watson supercomputer having a similar role to play in human healthcare. Such systems, he said, will become as ubiquitous as the humble stethoscope.

Rhee, who was a physician earlier in his career, recalls struggling with the sheer volume of data involved in treating patients. Worse, the data was presented, at the time, on reams of paper and charts. Throw in new materials and understanding generated by medical journals and it soon becomes a mountain of information that can hinder, rather than help.

Via Wildcat2030
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The Teaching Excellence Framework: can higher education up its game?

The Teaching Excellence Framework: can higher education up its game? | Medical Education | Scoop.it
Student satisfaction will be central to the government’s new assessment system, but critics say data can be a poor measure of university teaching
Edinburgh Medical School's insight:

The first of two cautionary articles.  Many like the idea of a TEF, but nobody quite knows how to do it well. 

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The Virtual Course That Could Change How Students Study Medicine

The Virtual Course That Could Change How Students Study Medicine | Medical Education | Scoop.it
Physicians assistants are highly paid medical professionals who provide a lot of the same healthcare services that doctors do. They take patient histories and perform physical exams, diagnose illnesses and develop treatment plans, prescribe medications and counsel patients. And in surgical settings, they suture wounds and assist with the procedures.
PAs, as they’re known in the industry, typically earn master’s degrees in medical science before practicing. These programs usually last three academic years and include classroom instruction in topics ranging from anatomy to pharmacology. Students also participate in more than 2,000 hours of clinical rotations. This training entails a lot of rigorous coursework—education that would, in theory, be hard to deliver outside the brick-and-mortar walls of the 175 or so higher-education institutions with accredited PA master’s programs.

Or maybe not. Soon, an aspiring PA might be able to complete nearly all this coursework online—and through an Ivy League to boot: Yale.

Yale announced earlier this month that it’s partnering with 2U, Inc.—a firm that helps selective nonprofit universities develop virtual degree programs—to launch its online PA initiative. The project is still pending approval by the accrediting commission for PA schools and from various state licensing agencies. But if it gets the green light, it would likely be the country’s first fully online PA degree. (Some programs are considered "hybrid" and entail a combination of on-campus and online coursework.) It would also become Yale’s first fully online master’s program and join the university’s existing on-campus PA program, which was launched in the early 1970s. The online program would cost the same as the on-campus one, whose sticker price is $35,654 annually for the first two years, excluding other fees.

Via Wildcat2030
Edinburgh Medical School's insight:

Physician Assistants first, what next?

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Why is electronic management of assessment (EMA) still achieving mediocre marks? Tell us what you think

Why is electronic management of assessment (EMA) still achieving mediocre marks? Tell us what you think | Medical Education | Scoop.it
We’re becoming increasingly used to dealing with the routine business of our daily lives online – from paying bills to buying groceries – so we might imagine that the days of students trudging to campus to hand in assignments, or trying to decipher a tutor’s scrawled comments are long gone. 
Edinburgh Medical School's insight:

Well we're doing this, but it's disappointing that the article seems to think eAssessment is just about marking essays. 

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The 36 best tools for data visualization | Web design | Creative Bloq

The 36 best tools for data visualization | Web design | Creative Bloq | Medical Education | Scoop.it
It's often said that data is the new world currency, and the web is the exchange bureau through which it's traded. As consumers, we're positively swimming in data; it's everywhere from labels on food packaging design to World Health Organisation reports.
Edinburgh Medical School's insight:

This is said to be the list to go to.  

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Maslow’s Hierarchy Of Needs Updated | WeKnowMemes

Maslow’s Hierarchy Of Needs Updated | WeKnowMemes | Medical Education | Scoop.it
Maslow's Hierarchy Of Needs Updated
Edinburgh Medical School's insight:

Not untrue

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Social Media Engagement is Not a Strategy

Social Media Engagement is Not a Strategy | Medical Education | Scoop.it
 
Social media marketers are keen to drive engagement but it may not necessarily be a viable strategy. In fact, it comes at a cost.
Source: www.slideshare.net

Mark Schaefer has a great point: we often confuse the means with the end.

In a blog post that I wrote a couple weeks ago, I explained why I thought social media publishing was dead - as we know it. One of these points was that the impact of publishing on social media for our goals is the combination of volume, quality and engagement. As Mark explains, engagement is only one variable in that equation.

So how can you convert your social media activity to make it count towards your goals?

One of the important basic first step you can take is to make sure you publish through a content hub that you can make your own and from where you can convert visitors: to subscribe to your content, to reshare your previously published content or to sign up for whatever pre-sales activity makes sense in your business. Continue reading →
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Edinburgh Medical School's comment, July 18, 2014 4:51 AM
Annoying 70 clicks to get through this, but if you too are thinking about your 'social media policy' it is worth it as the core message is all so true.
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Copyright Flowchart: Can I Use It? Yes? No? If This... Then...

Copyright Flowchart: Can I Use It? Yes? No? If This... Then... | Medical Education | Scoop.it
It is the responsibility of all educators to model good digital citizenship for their students. Especially when it comes to copyright, plagiarism and intellectual property. The waters are murky. No...
Edinburgh Medical School's insight:

Good sense, nice graphic explanations.  UK doesn't have the North American concept of Fair Use, note.  

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6 challenges impeding technology adoption in higher education

6 challenges impeding technology adoption in higher education | Medical Education | Scoop.it
In our second look at the NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Higher Education Edition, we cover the six “significant challenges” it identifies as impeding the adoption of technology in higher education
Edinburgh Medical School's insight:

Interesting thoughts - progress in institutions always slower than progress in the world suggests. 

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The Real World Is Not an Exam

The Real World Is Not an Exam | Medical Education | Scoop.it
For students just entering medicine after tens of thousands of test questions, many medical problems don’t have the single best answer they do on exams.
Edinburgh Medical School's insight:

It's true, and why seeing many patients is so important. But couldn't we do better with our exams?

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Report: Apple Is Working on Medical Devices, Mulling Cars - Gizmodo

Report: Apple Is Working on Medical Devices, Mulling Cars - Gizmodo | Medical Education | Scoop.it
A report from the San Francisco Chronicle suggests that Apple is working to develop new product lines--including medical devices and cars.
Edinburgh Medical School's insight:
Looking forward to the iDialyser
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Three reasons why the Teaching Excellence Framework won’t work | Peter Scott

Three reasons why the Teaching Excellence Framework won’t work | Peter Scott | Medical Education | Scoop.it
The government’s new TEF uses a cocktail of unhelpful metrics that will only favour ‘top’ universities and allow them to accumulate more in fees
Edinburgh Medical School's insight:

Second cautionary article about a TEF.  Concern about gaming, unfairness, measuring the wrong thing.  On a background of "It seems hard to object to the principle that university teaching should be assessed in the same way that the all-powerful Research Excellence Framework (REF) assesses research."

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Are College Lectures Unfair?

Are College Lectures Unfair? | Medical Education | Scoop.it
Evidence suggests that it’s not the right form of teaching for many women, minorities and low-income students.
Edinburgh Medical School's insight:

In this New York Times article the author of a forthcoming book cites a forthcoming paper (about chemistry teaching) that again found that 'flipped' teaching/ active learning increased overall achievement, but especially in women - evidence is also alluded to that this style improves knowledge retention and narrows the gap between students who have or don't have markers associated with lower attainment. Not very new, but nicely presented and a good read. 
Would this type of teaching be so effective if it was the only way, rather than a novelty?

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Exercise Medicine is Ancient History

Exercise Medicine is Ancient History | Medical Education | Scoop.it
Exercise was used as medicine at least 2600 years ago. Funny how we're just catching on now.
Edinburgh Medical School's insight:

Big national campaign in the UK to rediscover this now

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Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories?

Learning Theory v5 - What are the established learning theories? | Medical Education | Scoop.it
Edinburgh Medical School's insight:

Not only a short list of learning theories (with clickable links to more info on each), but also a nice implementation of a concept map (made with cmap tools, http://cmap.ihmc.us)(Free)

Note the clickable icons on each box.  

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Mededtutor's curator insight, February 14, 4:05 AM
Love this!
Janita Keating's curator insight, March 23, 4:33 AM

Love this!

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Richard Lehman’s journal review—11 August 2014

Richard Lehman’s journal review—11 August 2014 | Medical Education | Scoop.it
NEJM 7 August 2014 Vol 371
497  A new gene for breast cancer susceptibility? The PALB2 gene locus has been known about for several years,
Edinburgh Medical School's insight:

Richard Lehman's reviews of current journals have become essential reading.  Outstanding pithy summaries of the scientific core often with a sideswiping but insightful comment about significance, relevance.  The real evidence-base is here.    

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Teachers stated: Money is not the key motivator to create online video lessons

Teachers stated: Money is not the key motivator to create  online video lessons | Medical Education | Scoop.it
theLearnia's survey: Money is not the first motivator for teachers to create online content. It comes after the desire to contribute their knowledge to the community. What are teachers’ preferences for e-learning?
Edinburgh Medical School's insight:

They love the idea for its effectiveness - views summarised in this nice infographic.  But less than half have done it, and 85% not prepared to spend more than half an hour on a 5-10 min video suggests there's a lot of work to be done. 

Warning: this item comes from a platform with its own agenda and aspirations to hold and control your resources.  And why is it headed by an image of Unhelfpul High School Teacher?

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Blogging as a Curation Platform

Blogging as a Curation Platform | Medical Education | Scoop.it
I have written about curation before using Twitter as a Curation Tool and about the importance of helping our Students Becoming Curators of Information.  Sue Waters also just published a very compr...
Edinburgh Medical School's insight:

Good sense and excellent graphic

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Lara Cooke's curator insight, April 23, 2015 1:01 PM

A deeper look at SoMe which we can apply in context of med ed. Thanks @langwitches 

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Faking Sick for a Living - Inkfish | DiscoverMagazine.com

Faking Sick for a Living - Inkfish | DiscoverMagazine.com | Medical Education | Scoop.it
Lying to your doctor is encouraged in one situation: when your doctor is a student and you're an actor asked to portray a certain condition. My friend Amy Savage does this for work.
Edinburgh Medical School's insight:

Alan Bennet's Smut is a funny good read based on simulated patients

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Jailed criminals think they are kinder, more trustworthy and honest than the average member of the public

Jailed criminals think they are kinder, more trustworthy and honest than the average member of the public | Medical Education | Scoop.it
Edinburgh Medical School's insight:

We aren't always as good at self-assessment as we'd like to think. 

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Team-based learning, anyone? | edmeded.org

Team-based learning, anyone? | edmeded.org | Medical Education | Scoop.it
Edinburgh Medical School's insight:

We're trying it. Reports soon

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