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Manager, Medical Device Process Excellence Job job in West Chester, PA

July 03, 2013. View the job posting for Manager, Medical Device Process Excellence Job at Johnson & Johnson in West Chester, PA.

Via Steven Bonacorsi
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Steven Bonacorsi's curator insight, July 3, 2013 1:07 PM

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Medical Device Hackers Find Government Ally to Pressure Industry

Medical Device Hackers Find Government Ally to Pressure Industry | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it
Two years ago, Jay Radcliffe discovered a software bug in his insulin pump that could allow hackers to take remote control of the device.

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What can medical device manufacturers do to improve the “Wild West of wireless?”

What can medical device manufacturers do to improve the “Wild West of wireless?” | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it
Medical device manufacturers should replicate the hospital environment where their WLAN-enabled devices are being deployed to ensure they can function according to Integra Systems.

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Scary Fact: Computer Viruses Are "Rampant" on Medical Devices in Hospitals

Scary Fact: Computer Viruses Are "Rampant" on Medical Devices in Hospitals | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it
A meeting of government officials reveals that medical equipment is becoming riddled with malware.

 

In a typical example, at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, 664 pieces of medical equipment are running on older Windows operating systems that manufactures will not modify or allow the hospital to change—even to add antivirus software—because of disagreements over whether modifications could run afoul of U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulatory reviews, Fu says.

 

As a result, these computers are frequently infected with malware, and one or two have to be taken offline each week for cleaning, says Mark Olson, chief information security officer at Beth Israel.

"I find this mind-boggling," Fu says. "Conventional malware is rampant in hospitals because of medical devices using unpatched operating systems. There's little recourse for hospitals when a manufacturer refuses to allow OS updates or security patches."

 

The worries over possible consequences for patients were described last Thursday at a meeting of a medical-device panel at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Information Security & Privacy Advisory Board, of which Fu is a member, in Washington, D.C. At the meeting, Olson described how malware at one point slowed down fetal monitors used on women with high-risk pregnancies being treated in intensive-care wards.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Glossary of Medical Devices and Procedures: Abbreviations, Acronyms, and Definitions1

The abbreviations, acronyms, and words included in this glossary represent medical device and procedure terminology found in everyday practice. Also included are many colloquial terms and abbreviations frequently encountered on requisitions for radiologic services or in daily conversation. These terms were purposely included because they are often not defined in standard medical texts or dictionaries. The definitions presented herein are the authors’ own, but we believe they conform to general usage. Some meanings vary from locale to locale and from specialty to specialty. Often, terms now in general medical usage originated from the name of a manufacturer or inventor of a particular device. Over time, these terms have acquired a generic meaning of their own, now being applied to a class of devices with the original meaning lost. Examples of this phenomenon include the Jackson-Pratt drain, the Hickman catheter, the Broviac catheter, the Swan-Ganz catheter, the Dobbhoff tube, and the Kirschner wire.

 

It is surprising that many such terms are not defined or even listed in leading medical specialty textbooks. The package inserts supplied with devices frequently do not cite references that deal with the device’s origin, even when the device carries an inventor’s name. There has also been a recent pernicious increase in the nonstandardized use of common abbreviations in requests for radiologic procedures. Prime examples include the abbreviations ASD and USA. ASD used to mean “atrial septal defect.” Now, it sometimes means “airspace disease.” USAused to mean the United States of America, but some use it to mean “unstable angina.”

 

The definitions and terms included in this glossary are derived from the authors’ own experience, from discussions with many colleagues, and from information contained in many excellent medical terminology texts. This glossary is also an extension of glossaries found in Radiologic Guide to Medical Devices and Foreign Bodies (St Louis, Mo: Mosby–Year Book, 1994) and Medical Devices, Abbreviations, Acronyms and Eponyms: A Pocket Guide (St Louis, Mo: Mosby, 1994).


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Robot Approved As Medical Device

Robot Approved As Medical Device | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it

The cyborg-like HAL robot has been approved for testing as a medical device for disabled people in Europe.


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Manager, Medical Device Process Excellence Job job in West Chester, PA

July 03, 2013. View the job posting for Manager, Medical Device Process Excellence Job at Johnson & Johnson in West Chester, PA.

Via Steven Bonacorsi
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Steven Bonacorsi's curator insight, July 3, 2013 1:07 PM

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US warns of cyberattacks targeting medical devices

US warns of cyberattacks targeting medical devices | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it
The FDA is warning that implanted medical devices, such as pacemakers and defibrillators, are often connected to networks that are vulnerable to cyber attacks that could shut down or manipulate the machinery.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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Printable biocompatible MEMS components are ideal for medical devices and ... - Next Big Future

Printable biocompatible MEMS components are ideal for medical devices and ...
Next Big Future
They have a variety of applications in consumer electronics, automobiles, and medicine.

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FDA awards contract to develop promising new technology to test radiation ... - FDA.gov

FDA awards contract to develop promising new technology to test radiation ...
FDA.gov
The U.S.

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FDA-Approved Breast Cancer Drug Treatments - Chemotherapy Advisor

FDA-Approved Breast Cancer Drug Treatments - Chemotherapy Advisor | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it

"List of FDA-Approved Breast Cancer Drug Treatments"


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Susan Zager's curator insight, August 14, 2013 9:36 AM

Here you wil find the updated list of breat cancer drug treatments.

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Hacking Real Things Becomes Child's Play At This Camp

Hacking Real Things Becomes Child's Play At This Camp | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it
Armed with technology know-how, teens and preteens are learning to hack everyday items and find bugs for major tech giants. Their work can pay off, with companies offering rewards for fixes.
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Encryption is less secure than we thought - MIT News Office

Encryption is less secure than we thought - MIT News Office | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it
For 65 years, most information-theoretic analyses of cryptographic systems have made a mathematical assumption that turns out to be wrong.
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Top 10 in Law Blogs: Cybersecurity Insurance, NLRB Back on Social Media, OSHA Inspections

Top 10 in Law Blogs: Cybersecurity Insurance, NLRB Back on Social Media, OSHA Inspections | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it
Tuesday's Top 10 in Law Blogs: Cybersecurity Insurance, NLRB Back on Social Media, OSHA Inspections http://t.co/sFJLuq9mhu
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How a Simple Smartphone Can Turn Your Car, Home, or Medical Device into a Deadly Weapon

How a Simple Smartphone Can Turn Your Car, Home, or Medical Device into a Deadly Weapon | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it
From embedded insulin pumps to tire-pressure gauges to home-safety monitors, microcomputers are making many aspects of life more convenient in America.

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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, December 21, 2012 9:24 AM

A look ahead that is deeper and more interesting than expected, based on the title.

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Camein.com » People-Powered Medical Devices?

Camein.com » People-Powered Medical Devices? | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it

Medical devices seem to get smaller every year. Think of something as simple as a pacemaker or hearing aid. Like their bretheren PCs, these gadgets that help enhance and extend our lives continue to shrink.


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MPR PD Group's curator insight, September 10, 8:48 AM

The itsy bitsy device that is powered by your body.

 

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(EN)-(FR)-(DE)-(PDF) - Proposal for a regulation of the European parliament and of the Council on in vitro diagnostic medical devices | europa.eu

"The current EU regulatory framework for in vitro diagnostic medical devices ('IVDs') consists of Directive 98/79/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council ('the IVD Directive') IVDs cover a wide range of products that can be used for population screening and disease prevention, diagnosis, monitoring of prescribed treatments and assessment of medical interventions.

 

Like Council Directive 90/385/EEC on active implantable medical devices (AIMDD) and Council Directive 93/42/EEC on medical devices (MDD) the IVD Directive is based on the 'New Approach' and aims to ensure the smooth functioning of the internal market and a high level of protection of human health and safety. IVDs are not subject to any pre-market authorisation by a regulatory authority but to a conformity assessment which, for the majority of devices, is carried out under the sole responsibility of the manufacturer. For the high-risk devices listed in Annex II and devices for self-testing, the conformity assessment involves an independent third party, known as 'notified body'. Notified bodies are designated and monitored by the Member States and act under the control of the national authorities.

 

Once certified, devices bear the CE marking which allows them to circulate freely in the EU/EFTA countries and Turkey. The existing regulatory framework for in vitro diagnostic medical devices has demonstrated its merits but has also come under criticism in recent years. In an internal market with 32 participating countries and subject to constant scientific and technological progress, substantial divergences in the interpretation and application of the rules have emerged, thus undermining the main objectives of the Directive, i.e. the safety and performance of IVDs and their ..."

 

German version: http://ec.europa.eu/health/medical-devices/files/revision_docs/proposal_2012_541_de.pdf

 

French version: http://ec.europa.eu/health/medical-devices/files/revision_docs/proposal_2012_541_fr.pdf


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Barnaby Jack, respected hacker of ATMs and medical devices, found dead in San Francisco

Barnaby Jack, respected hacker of ATMs and medical devices, found dead in San Francisco | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it

Barnaby Jack, a programmer and hacker who gained worldwide recognition and respect for numerous technical feats including hacking medical implants and hijacking an ATM (cash machine) and forcing it to spit out money, was found dead on Thursday evening in an apartment in San Francisco, as Reuters reported. According to Reuters, a police spokesperson said that "foul play" was not suspected in Jack's death. But the report states that an autopsy is being performed, and that the results are anticipated within a month. Jack was reportedly 35.

 

 


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Hacking Insulin Pumps And Other Medical Devices - Reality Not Fiction - Forbes

Hacking Insulin Pumps And Other Medical Devices - Reality Not Fiction - Forbes | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it
Hacking Insulin Pumps And Other Medical Devices - Reality Not Fiction
Forbes
One of the briefings at Black Hat this year was a session on how vulnerable medical devices are to cyber attack, given by Jay Radcliff.

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Medical Device “Cartels” Cause High Prices for U.S. Joint Replacement

Medical Device “Cartels” Cause High Prices for U.S. Joint Replacement | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it
An article in The New York Times reports on the high costs of joint replacement in the United States compared to other developed countries. These procedures are “many more times” as expensive in the United States than they are in other countries.

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Three medical device trends that are saving lives

Three medical device trends that are saving lives | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it

If there’s one thing we can always count on in the medical device world, it’s the steady beat of progress. We look for the big idea that will save lives, make doctors’ jobs easier and the medical field more efficient — thus saving costs. As designers, we keep our eyes on innovations in the medical device world. Here are three trends that are making an impact.

 

Making medical devices smaller and portable

Access to effective care often requires medical devices which are smaller, lighter and more portable. In order to go big, we need to think small. Interestingly, this trend is prevalent in both resource poor and resource rich healthcare systems

 

The drive towards earlier and more accurate diagnosis

Current cancer detection and monitoring methods can be extremely invasive or poorly targeted, resulting in low treatment efficacy and unpleasant side effects

 

Using data for prevention

There is a growing desire for medical devices — including those that are wearable — to track and monitor personal health. There are countless smart phone apps that track health-related issues, such as restful sleep, exercise, and diet. The current trend is towards devices that support and tap into our increasingly endless desire for more information.

 


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Micro-machines for the human body: Researchers adapt microscopic technology for bionic body parts and other medical devices

Micro-machines for the human body: Researchers adapt microscopic technology for bionic body parts and other medical devices | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it
Tiny sensors and motors tell your smartphone screen to rotate and your camera to focus. But now researchers have found a way to print biocompatible components for these micro-machines, making them ideal for use in medical devices like bionic arms.

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Cutting the Wires: FDA Provides Industry Guidance | FDA Voice

Cutting the Wires: FDA Provides Industry Guidance | FDA Voice | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it

Via Ellen H Ullman, MSW
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Government partners with security services to launch Cyber Incident Response schemes

Government partners with security services to launch Cyber Incident Response schemes | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it
Two cyber security schemes have been launched today to provide industry expertise to victims of cyber-security attacks (Government partners with #security services to launch #Cyber Incident Response schemes http://t.co/fWnV48hzic)...
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Baby monitor hacker 'like burglar'

Baby monitor hacker 'like burglar' | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it
A family in Houston in the US apparently had their child's baby monitor camera hacked, after insulting phrases emanated from the unit. (RT @Sigman_Law_Firm: Now people are hacking into baby monitors? What is wrong with people?
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10 Tips to Prevent Phishing Attacks

10 Tips to Prevent Phishing Attacks | Medical Device Hacking | Scoop.it
    As you know, Phishing is a technique that involves tricking the user to steal confidential information , passwords, etc, into thinking you are a confidential site.
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