Medical Communications
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Statisticians Found One Thing They Can Agree On: It’s Time To Stop Misusing P-Values

Statisticians Found One Thing They Can Agree On: It’s Time To Stop Misusing P-Values | Medical Communications | Scoop.it

Little p-value What are you trying to say Of significance? — Stephen Ziliak, Roosevelt University economics professor How many statisticians does it take to en…

Tom Rees's insight:
The American Statistical Association has published a commentary for non-statisticians on understanding and interpreting p-values. This article neatly summarizes the key points, including gems such as:

"One of the most important messages is that the p-value cannot tell you if your hypothesis is correct. Instead, it’s the probability of your data given your hypothesis."

and

"A common misconception among nonstatisticians is that p-values can tell you the probability that a result occurred by chance. This interpretation is dead wrong"
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Harvard researchers tested 23 online ‘symptom checkers.’ Here’s how they stack up.

Harvard researchers tested 23 online ‘symptom checkers.’ Here’s how they stack up. | Medical Communications | Scoop.it

Ever asked the Internet what your symptoms mean and gotten a response that seemed wacky or totally off base? It's not your imagination.In an audit that is believed to be the first of its kind, Harvard Medical School researchers have tested 23 online “symptom checkers” — run by brand names such as the Mayo Clinic, the American Academy of Pediatrics and WebMD, as well as lesser-knowns such as Symptomate — and found that, though the programs varied widely in accuracy of diagnoses and triage advice, as a whole they were astonishingly inaccurate. Symptom checkers provided the correct diagnosis first in only 34 percent of cases, and within the first three diagnoses 51 percent of the time.


Via Alex Butler
Tom Rees's insight:

They didn't assess whether a human could do better, and they didn't assess NHS direct. Nevertheless a cautionary tale! 

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Havas Lynx Medical's curator insight, July 13, 2015 3:13 AM

Of course we need a comparison with those age old symptom checkers 'doctors' to know if this is bad or not

David Proudlock's curator insight, July 13, 2015 4:40 AM

I wonder how IBM's Watson would fare as a symptom checker in this test?

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E-learning for health professionals - The Cochrane Library - Vaona - Wiley Online Library

Protocol for a Cochrane review
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Five digital campaigns that show pharma really can do it

Five digital campaigns that show pharma really can do it | Medical Communications | Scoop.it

Pick a week and you'll find a headline somewhere declaring that digital marketing and pharma just don't mix. Cue the list of hardships: regulatory compliance, side-effect reporting guidelines, risk disclosures or any of the other reasons drugmakers use to justify staying away from digital. While it's true that digital and social media aren't the panacea for what ails pharma marketing, just saying no to digital isn't an option anymore. Need some inspiration? Check out what's working for these pharmas.

Novartis' "Hey MS Take This!" campaign for Gilenya

Novartis ($NVS) tackled MS with attitude and humor with the digital social campaign aimed at attracting the attention of younger MS patients with the then-launch of its oral treatment. MS patients confidently stick out their tongues in a double meaning to the disease and showing them taking the pill. The campaign created by FCB Health begun in 2013 has gained traction since then, employing MS patients as Gilenya Guide advocates and including engaging elements such as a "Let's Talk" section on its Facebook page that encourages community and information sharing. Sales of Gilenya in 2014 were $2.48 billion, up 28% over 2013.

!

Bayer Healthcare's Grants4Apps

Bayer launched its innovative health accelerator Grants4Apps last year offering 50,000 euros, plus free space and mentors at Bayer's headquarters in Berlin, to five startups with the best tech ideas for healthcare. In conjunction, Bayer created a digital marketing campaign, along with a series of traveling meetups, to drum up interest. The program's website and newsletter are robust news sources for grant info, while Twitter serves as ground zero for social media, including a series of Vines from top executives and scientists in many languages. Last year, 70 companies applied; this year Bayer has already hosted visitors from 200 countries, with the deadline to apply May 31.

Genentech's RheumatoidArthritis.com

Genentech's rheumatoid arthritis treatments have delivered billions in sales, but new competitors have elbowed in--and the company wanted to reassert its leadership role. Its agency, CDMIConnect, helped it create an online forum and community for RA meant to stand out in the crowded space. They tapped patient leaders in the community to be content providers, targeting topics not covered in other forums. They posted Genetech-created content and physician contributions as well. To foster sharing across devices, all content came with Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and email buttons. Once patients were engaged, CDMI's custom software would direct them to the Genetech drug that might work best for them. According to CDMI, patients didn't balk. The effort won a bronze Clio advertising award in 2014.

Johnson & Johnson's Janssen Healthcare Innovation Care4Today

Care4Today is the masterbrand for Janssen mobile and digital healthcare tools that so far includes a suite of sub-branded software apps focused on heart health,orthopedics, mental health and mobile medication management. Some tools allow patient information to be linked and tracked in real time, so that, for instance, a doctor could see when a patient misses or skips taking prescribed medicines, and send a reminder or message. The goal is to engage patients in their own treatment and improve results--before and after hospital stays, or in between doctor visits. Janssen, which is owned by Johnson & Johnson ($JNJ), reports high patient satisfaction across its different apps, and tests have shown positive results, such as cutting down wait times to see a specialist or raising adherence rates.


Via Plus91
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Pascal Kerhervé's curator insight, July 28, 2015 10:52 AM

Who said that Pharma cannot do it? And there is even more to come! #DigitalPharma 

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Elsevier on their latest developments in scholarly publishing

Elsevier on their latest developments in scholarly publishing | Medical Communications | Scoop.it
While the principles of publishing hold fast, technological innovation presents new possibilities for researchers and publishers.
Tom Rees's insight:
" While providing high-quality content will always be crucial, it is no longer enough. Our job doesn't end with publishing articles in journals; it actually begins there. Today we must leverage big data applications to add value to that content and develop better, faster, more efficient tools and solutions. A significant part of a publisher’s role now is to provide the right content, to the right audience, in the right context, when and how they want it."
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These Five Corporations Control Academic Publishing

These Five Corporations Control Academic Publishing | Medical Communications | Scoop.it
An analysis of the 45 million documents indexed in the Web of Science, and recently published in PLoS, reveals that Reed-Elsevier, Springer, Wiley-Blackwell, Taylor & Francis and Sage published more than half of all academic papers in the peer-reviewed literature in 2013. The study suggests it may be time for scientists to move away from major for-profit publishing houses, and take their research elsewhere.
Tom Rees's insight:

Biomedical Sciences are relatively more diverse - only 42% of articles are published by the Big 5. And this is not too dissimilar from other markets, where typically there are no more than 6 big players (and often fewer).

 

But still, could this undermine competition? I would argue that the bigger issue is that subscribing to the bigger journals in whichever field you are interested in is mandatory - so in effect there is no competition.

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Hoax-detecting software spots fake papers

Hoax-detecting software spots fake papers | Medical Communications | Scoop.it
Springer jumps into sham submissions arms race
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Academic publisher Springer this week is releasing SciDetect, an open-source program to automatically detect automatically generated papers.
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Author’s reasons for unpublished research presented at biomedical conferences: a systematic review - Journal of Clinical Epidemiology

Author’s reasons for unpublished research presented at biomedical conferences: a systematic review - Journal of Clinical Epidemiology | Medical Communications | Scoop.it
Tom Rees's insight:
Primary reason for not publishing was lack of time. Could this be why, as per NEJM today, industry trials are more likely to be published withing 1 year? They have medical writing support!
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New research reveals pharmaceutical and medical attitudes to ‘KOL’ terminology

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KOLs don't like to be called EEs, prefer TAE or maybe even EP.

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The geography of plagiarism | SciELO in Perspective

The geography of plagiarism | SciELO in Perspective | Medical Communications | Scoop.it
It is well known the problem of plagiarism in scientific literature.
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In the United States, Canada and a few industrialized countries in Europe and Asia the amount of marked articles was around 1%, Japan 6%, China and India arriving at twice the average with 10% and higher values such as Iran (15%) and Bulgaria (20%) which is eight times higher than New Zealand.
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How the ‘Matthew Effect’ helps some scientific papers gain popularity

How the ‘Matthew Effect’ helps some scientific papers gain popularity | Medical Communications | Scoop.it
Fine-grained research shows boost for leading-edge and low-profile work in the life sciences happens after authors are honored.
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Publications get a citation boost if one of the authors wins a research award.

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Clinical Trial Data: Share and Share Alike?

Clinical Trial Data: Share and Share Alike? | Medical Communications | Scoop.it
A key question for investigators conducting clinical trials has changed direction. Instead of asking why they should share data with other researchers or drug and medical device manufacturers, they’re more likely to ask how to disseminate the information. Reluctance to share data has been the norm...
Tom Rees's insight:

Although the IOM report provides a high-level blueprint of how to approach trial data sharing, it isn’t clear how these recommendations will be put into practice. For example, open questions surround feasibility and implementation, particularly as the IOM committee concluded that existing data-sharing platforms are too inefficient and expensive to meet the anticipated storage and management demands of clinical trial data should all parties comply with the recommendations.

 

The report also raises the question of data usability, pointing out that the data must be accessible in a form that will allow investigators to easily search and computationally analyze the data sets—a need that is currently unmet, the IOM report concluded. It’s also unclear how sharing clinical trial data will benefit patients if the data languish in shared repositories.

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Altmetric Top 100 - 2014

Altmetric Top 100 - 2014 | Medical Communications | Scoop.it
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The top 100 for this throws up some cool new research that has engaged public interest over the past year.

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Professional medical writing support and the quality of randomised controlled trial reporting: a cross-sectional study

Professional medical writing support and the quality of randomised controlled trial reporting: a cross-sectional study William T Gattrell1,2, Sally Hopewell3, Kate Young4, Paul Farrow1, Richard White1,2, Elizabeth Wager5,6, Christopher C Winchester1,7...

Tom Rees's insight:

Some great and much-needed research into this topic. Unfortunately, I think the positive conclusions have to be taken with a pinch of salt at this stage. There was no control for selection bias, and it seems probable that manuscripts with medical writing support will be related to larger or more clinically impactful studies. There was no comparison of sample differences in number of study centres per study, patients, impact factor of journal, or other indicators of study size/importance.

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The demise of the Impact Factor: The strength of the relationship between citation rates and IF is down to levels last seen 40 years ago

The demise of the Impact Factor: The strength of the relationship between citation rates and IF is down to levels last seen 40 years ago | Medical Communications | Scoop.it
The demise of the Impact Factor: The strength of the relationship between citation rates and IF is down to levels last seen 40 years ago

Via Nader Ale Ebrahim
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Journal choice was never just about IF - but now more than ever other factors should be considered. And it's all down to the rise of the search engine and social media.

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Doctors created music video about sepsis. The result is sick.

Doctors created music video about sepsis. The result is sick. | Medical Communications | Scoop.it
Want to learn about sepsis? This video from the residents at UCLA- Kern Medical Center teaches you, Justin Timberlake Style.
Tom Rees's insight:
How about this as an approach to #meded
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The Healthy Are Dying Out - Newsletter: DocCheck News - DocCheck-News - DocCheck News

The Healthy Are Dying Out - Newsletter: DocCheck News - DocCheck-News - DocCheck News | Medical Communications | Scoop.it

Apparently, ubiquitous access to medication and medical care does not improve the subjective perception of one's health among members of the population. Despite medical advances, people feel more ill than they did 25 years ago. What is going wrong with all those experiencing sick feelings?

Tom Rees's insight:

Seems like it's partly because our expectations are much higher than they used to be.

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Patient Information Too High for Patients' Literacy: New Research

"Conducting formal readability testing, as suggested by the study authors, along with use of patient reviewers from a variety of educational and cultural backgrounds may provide important feedback to enhance the value of materials across a larger spectrum of health literacy levels."
Tom Rees's insight:

"Conducting formal readability testing, as suggested by the study authors, along with use of patient reviewers from a variety of educational and cultural backgrounds may provide important feedback to enhance the value of materials across a larger spectrum of health literacy levels."

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Want to enhance medical education? Use spaced repetition.

Want to enhance medical education? Use spaced repetition. | Medical Communications | Scoop.it
Spaced repetition is a powerful, evidence-based study technique that can enhance learning and long-term retention of medical knowledge.
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10 Tips for Creating Engaging Videos « AMA Tampa Bay

10 Tips for Creating Engaging Videos « AMA Tampa Bay | Medical Communications | Scoop.it

Via callooh
Tom Rees's insight:

Some useful tips - including the importance of repeating questions/answers and encouraging 'storytelling mode'.

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callooh's curator insight, March 15, 2015 1:36 PM

We don't all have the camera set ups described but I do recommend working with a partner and using a two-camera set up if at all possible.

 

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Compliance with Results Reporting at ClinicalTrials.gov — NEJM

Special Article from The New England Journal of Medicine — Compliance with Results Reporting at ClinicalTrials.gov
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"... we estimated that during the 5-year period, approximately 79 to 80% of industry-funded trials reported summary results or had a legally acceptable reason for delay. In contrast, only 49 to 50% of NIH-funded trials and 42 to 45% of those funded by other government or academic institutions reported results or had legally acceptable reasons for delay."
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The Science of Scientific Writing » American Scientist

The Science of Scientific Writing » American Scientist | Medical Communications | Scoop.it
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The art of clarity in technical writing. This is quite a long article, taking some example prose and unpicking it to reveal in detail how the writing can be improved. Some great things to consider - even for experienced writers.

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The virtual road to recovering trust in academic publishing - EuroScientist

The virtual road to recovering trust in academic publishing - EuroScientist | Medical Communications | Scoop.it
Collaboration between academic publishers and researchers for a better future.
Tom Rees's insight:
Excellent article on the trends in peer review and open science. It's clear there will be major implications for publications professionals. Especially the move away from pre publication, blinded peer review.
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Med Pearls app reminds you to practice evidence based medicine - iMedicalApps

Med Pearls app reminds you to practice evidence based medicine - iMedicalApps | Medical Communications | Scoop.it
Med Pearls uses email reminders to guide you to practice evidence based medicine.
Tom Rees's insight:
"I have seen residents and fellows get excited by the latest evidence from a guest speaker or new journal article that includes a practice-changing conclusion only to review charts days later seeing the “old” evidence still in use. Why can’t we more readily change our practice?" Looks like a interesting app, building on the concept of spaced learning.
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The 'Social Media Phase Of The Internet' Is Over

The 'Social Media Phase Of The Internet' Is Over | Medical Communications | Scoop.it
Fred Wilson on what happened in 2014.
Tom Rees's insight:
"Messaging is the new social media ... Families use WhatsApp groups instead of Facebook. Kids use Snapchat instead of Instagram. Facebook’s acquisition of WhatsApp in February of this year was the transaction that defined this trend."
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