Psychology of Media & Technology
14.6K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
onto Psychology of Media & Technology
Scoop.it!

How A Toronto-Based Storytelling App Is Becoming A Hollywood Idea Factory

How A Toronto-Based Storytelling App Is Becoming A Hollywood Idea Factory | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

For those of you who believed the written word was dead, not so fast!  The unending appetite for good stories and Wattpad as a vehicle for storytellers (think YouTube for readers) provides an obvious entry point for marketers who can craft compelling brand narratives.  The value of storytelling in text is that is that it lets the reader supply the visual storyworld through their imagination, instantly turning them into stakeholders.

more...
The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, June 14, 2016 8:18 PM

 

Nicole LaPorte:  "Having established itself as a critical part of movie-marketing campaigns, Wattpad is now looking to produce its own entertainment."

Psychology of Media & Technology
The science behind media behaviors
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

Jerry Brown’s California ‘freeloaders’ hit back on tax hike

Jerry Brown’s California ‘freeloaders’ hit back on tax hike | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
California Gov. Jerry Brown may have been trying to shame opponents of his gas-and-car tax increase by calling them "freeloaders," but so far the barb has backfired.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Disrespect burns bridges. Shaming doesn't work if you want buy-in.  It's bad enough that our President resorts to name calling, but now we Californians have a Governor who calls anyone who disagrees with him about additional taxes on autos & gas "freeloaders."  One of the first things we teach in conflict resolution is to avoid blanket labeling and name-calling.  This tactic reduces the other party to a faceless other, diminishes their humanity and pretty much eliminates any chance of attitude change.  Trump won't always have executive privilege.  Brown won't always have a "super-majority" behind him.  Both should be careful.  Their actions as role models are disrespectful of society as a whole.  Naïve as it may be, I personally expect more from all elected officials--at least the ones who want my vote.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

The Future of Jobs and Jobs Training

The Future of Jobs and Jobs Training | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
As robots, automation and artificial intelligence perform more tasks and there is massive disruption of jobs, experts say a wider array of education and
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Positive psychology can build the future, moving us away from occupation-based identity to strengths-based identity.  Traditional models train people to equate what they do with who they are (i.e., what do you want to be when you grow up) rather than to develop strengths, acquire critical thinking and flexible skills and attitudes that fit a rapidly changing world.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

My Love For Reality TV Is Anything But Trivial, Especially In 2017

My Love For Reality TV Is Anything But Trivial, Especially In 2017 | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
"Ugh, how could you watch that?" "This show is so shallow." "Aren't there better things to do with your time?" Insert the name of any reality series (The Bachelor, Keeping Up With The Kardashians, Real Housewives, Vanderpump Rules) into one of those
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Doing anything that is intentional with the goal of relaxation is a form of self-care.  It's okay to use media to check out for a little, to regroup, to do something that rejuvenates us without worrying about the moral judgment of someone else, whether it's Reality TV or classic films.  It's often about the ability of the media to creative positive emotions by providing escape or even a bit of social connection--something that allows for cognitive relaxation, not effort. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

Parasocial Relationships: What Is the Internet Doing to Our Minds? — NOVA Next | PBS

Parasocial Relationships: What Is the Internet Doing to Our Minds? — NOVA Next | PBS | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it

"The visceral cues provided by the up-close-and-personal nature of the videos help blur the line for viewers, allowing them to feel that there is a genuine bond with the host"

Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The Internet functions like a giant petri dish for understanding different human emotions when we remember that at, the core people, are driven by fundamental desires: 1) to connect socially and 2) to feel like that matter.  Unboxing videos offer two important aspects of this.  The ability to see someone's face repeatedly creates a sense of knowing, particularly when they look into the camera and we can see facial expressions.  Our brain automatically responds in kind.  The ability to interact through comments increases the sense of connection by creating some ownership in the relationship.  Sharing the unboxing experience--the emotion, the anticipation, and the speculation about how will something work or what it's good for--creates a level of intimacy.  Understanding how people think and what they like is how we get to know them both off and online.  Finally, seeing information that increases your knowledge bank, even if it is something as simple as how to use a new toy or appliance, increases one's sense of agency and competence.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

How (and Why) to Throw a Device-Free Party

How (and Why) to Throw a Device-Free Party | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it

Tune out, don't throw out, your technology.  Pay attention to the people you'er with.

Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The point of a device-free party isn't what's missing (the devices), it's what's there (the social connection).  Don't focus so much on the technology at the expense of human experience.  Interesting people and conversation will naturally be device-free, but don't keep new parents in a state of preoccupation because you won't allow a cell phone (who even has a landline anymore?)  The job of the host is to guide the interaction of the guests and make sure everyone has a good time.  Introduce a cellphone user to a new person, don't shame them because they don't know how to engage.  Tune out, don't throw out, your technology.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

Social Media Activities That Aren't as Bad as You Think | Reader's Digest

Social Media Activities That Aren't as Bad as You Think | Reader's Digest | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
You've been told your social media usage is all wrong. Stop feeling guilty about your Facebook and Instagram activities—they're not as bad as you think.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Research, especially in psychology, comes from a long history of asking “what’s missing?” or “What’s wrong here?” thanks to the heritage of the medical model.  Our brains also have a tendency to focus on “what’s wrong” --thanks to the drive for survival--rather than exploring how we can make more of “what’s right.” Rarely in technology research do we ask “what goals does this technology help?” 

 

For nearly every technology with a bad rap, I can give you a way to think about it with a positive framework because I’m starting with these simple questions:  How does it impact social connection, autonomy and mastery?

 

If the user experience is satisfying anyone or more of those, then I know part of the outcome will be positive emotions.  Positive emotions are very powerful things.  They create an upward spiral that increases what Positive Psychologist Barbara Fredrickson calls the “thought-action” repertoire.  Positive emotions over time enhance resilience, empathy, optimism, hope, and self-efficacy not to mention more creative thought, lower blood pressures and improved general health.  Don't automatically dis social media behaviors.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

Scientists know why your selfies are funny and authentic but everyone else's are so narcissistic

Scientists know why your selfies are funny and authentic but everyone else's are so narcissistic | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
You're at the park, lounging on a colorful blanket that perfectly contrasts with the grass. At a concert, neon lights reflecting off your glistening forehead. In front of the historical monument that subtly displays your love of culture. Or maybe you're just lying on the couch feeling sexy. Then it happens: You tussle your hair, extend your arm, smile/smize/duck-face/wink, and snap a selfie
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

A recent study shows the differential between our impressions of other's selfies and those of our own.  Not surprising.  We all tend to attribute positive intentions to ourselves.  Couple this with ego maintenance and the negative perception of selfies as an indication of self-indulgence, narcissism and it makes sense that we would think our own selfie-taking behavior is more positive and benevolent.  All the negative press following the explosion of selfies comes from the technology-enabled disruption of how, when and who can take portraits.  The big concerns about rampant pathology (addiction, narcissism, etc.) have not been uniformly born out in the literature.  Yet the stigma remains as the behavior challenges existing mental models (such as whether or not it’s okay for women to self-promote). This influences how we explain our use so that it’s consistent with our self view.  

 

In my research, participants felt that their friends posted many more selfies than they personally did; participants also viewed their own uses as more positive than that of others, consistent with the findings of the Munich researchers.  The values that are called into question by selfie-taking and posting, such as the need for attention, the desire to present a ‘best-self’ for public approval and validation and the inherent lack of authenticity in those behaviors, are attributed to others more than self.  

 

However, from a positive psychology perspective, I argue that the ‘best self’ selfies or aspirational selfie is not a negative, but a valuable way of seeing a path to desired behaviors and attributes for internal purposes rather than getting external Likes.  But we should not completely dismiss Likes as a negative.  Humans are social animals, hardwired to form relationships and tribes.  Likes are a way of validating affiliation and social norms.

 

Posting high points in life can increase confidence, empowerment, gratitude and appreciation through mindfulness and the ability to visualize desired outcomes.  Thus selfie-taking behaviors are, in fact, authentic behaviors when conceptualized in this way.  Selfie-takers experience of personal selfies as a positive can also reflect the ability of image to allow us to revisit and appreciate past positive events, increasing positive emotions. Thus the cognitive dissonance, or social conflict, people feel regarding selfies can be reconciled by this split attribution of intention.  

 

There is, as always, a caveat to selfie-taking and any behavior, on or offline, that triggers insecurities.   Excessive time spent in any behavior or rumination over others' perceptions and the need for others' approval can be problematic.  Balance is the key in the use of all digital tools.  If social media activities generate more negative emotions than positive for anyone or become obsessive, I recommend a social media audit (a few days of journaling that includes: what you use, why you used it and how you felt at the time.)  This is similar to other behavior logs that help people identify the emotional responses and triggers behind maladaptive behaviors.  If the self-insight from the audit doesn't help, alway seek professional help.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

Facebook Addiction: Signs You Overuse Social Media | Reader's Digest

Facebook Addiction: Signs You Overuse Social Media | Reader's Digest | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it

Pulling up the Facebook app is so easy that it's easy to fall into a Facebook habit. Learn the signs of spending too much time on social media.

Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Facebook can be an excellent form of relaxation but it can also be a total time suck.  Practice mindful social media use - be aware of how you're using sites like Facebook and why.  Use the best tool for the job.  Recognize what Facebook is good for -- social connection -- and what it's not good for.  Facebook is a social news site.  It's great for news about what your friends or even fav celeb are doing.  Don't rely on it for serious news because what you read might well be fake.  Go to legitimate news sources.

 

Keeping a social media journal, like a food or exercise log, for a couple of days will help you identify how you're using social media, when and, most importantly, how it makes you feel.  Would you hang out with people who make you feel bad?  Of course not.  You don't have to do it on social media, either.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

'Why Don't I Look Like Her?': How Instagram Is Ruining Our Self Esteem

'Why Don't I Look Like Her?': How Instagram Is Ruining Our Self Esteem | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
We tend to be much harder on ourselves than others are on us," she said. "Whereas others take in an image holistically, noticing expressions of emotion and mood such as a smile, we are scrutinizing the minor details."
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

"We tend to be much harder on ourselves than others are on us," she said. "Whereas others take in an image holistically, noticing expressions of emotion and mood such as a smile, we are scrutinizing the minor details."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

Augmented-Reality Helmet Could Give Cyclists Extra Eyes on the Road

Augmented-Reality Helmet Could Give Cyclists Extra Eyes on the Road | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
An augmented-reality helmet that gives cyclists a 360-degree view of the road could help prevent accidents, according to the device's designers.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

This concept for AR bike helmets features front and rear cameras and a drop-down visor that can overlay live-streaming footage from a rear camera onto the rider's field of vision.   This is just the beginning of ways that wearables can improve safety, provide high-quality performance feedback and inspire behavior change.  Very exciting!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Pervasive Entertainment Times
Scoop.it!

The #VR Empathy Machine Continues - UN advisor wants you to feel like a refugee—in virtual reality

The #VR Empathy Machine Continues - UN advisor wants you to feel like a refugee—in virtual reality | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
U.N. Creative Director Gabo Arora wants people to feel and see humanitarian issues like the Syrian refugee crisis through virtual reality storytelling.

Via Gary Hayes
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

VR taps into the psychological power of presence ("being there") and our brains react as if we were "really" there, experiencing events physically, emotionally and cognitively.  VR has tremendous potential for applications where the goal is to see the world through another's eyes.  The end result is not just empathy, but to break down barriers by emphasizing our shared humanity, not individual differences.

more...
Gary Hayes's curator insight, September 24, 2016 9:48 PM
Quote "Started in early 2015, United Nations Virtual Reality (UNVR) was created to fund-raise and impact peace building. The app, backed by UNVR's offices in 150 countries, aims to make real humanitarian tragedies virtual. The UN's virtual reality lab has made people feel a "greater empathic response" through films. UNVR showed "My Mother's Wing" in the streets of Tel Aviv, Israel, to raise awareness about the aftermath of the wars in Palestine."
Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from Pervasive Entertainment Times
Scoop.it!

Creating #VR Content? 10 Commandments every virtual reality experience creator should follow

Creating #VR Content? 10 Commandments every virtual reality experience creator should follow | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
Thou shall cast thy fury at developers who do not keep these design rules dear.

Via Gary Hayes
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Good "rules" but above all else, it has to have a good story.  

more...
Gary Hayes's curator insight, September 12, 2016 7:42 PM
Quote "7. Thine kingdom need not be be realistic Unfortunately, realism doesn't work that well with VR. What you have to aim for is coherence and consistency - if you turn your head, the view should move, but if you need to walk forward, it doesn't have to be exactly like real life with head-bouncing and swaying from side to side as you take a step. That would just make everyone throw up. The less perfect the VR experience is, the less the player will expect, and the easier it is to fool them into seeing everything as real."
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

Binge-watching could actually be bad for you

Binge-watching could actually be bad for you | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
All of these studies are coming at it from the presumption that the way we used to do it is the right way," said Pamela Rutledge, a media psychologist and faculty member at California's Fielding Graduate University. "That's been true of a lot of media research — and a lot of research in general — because we only know what we do."
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

It's important to remember that most studies are looking at media and new technology from the presumption that the way we used to do things is the right way.  That's been true of a lot of media research — and a lot of research in general — because we only know what we do.  Think back to the "demon radio."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

App Aims To Curb Cellphone Addiction

App Aims To Curb Cellphone Addiction | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
It's no secret that most of us spend a lot of time glued to our smartphones. Now a new app, Onward, is aiming to curb that addiction. Here's how it works.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Referring to excessive cellphone use as addiction is a misnomer.  Addictions are serious stuff.  Being mindful about behavior, however, and making conscious decisions about how you spend your time is important. Taking responsibility for your behavior starts with identifying goals and getting a realistic assessment of the way you use your time.  Apps can be valuable tools in providing objective assessment as our ability to estimate all kinds of things has been shown to be very poo, from calories and exercise to time spent on Facebook.  We unconsciously adjust to support our sense of self-worth.  But apps are only as useful as they are actually used.  Compliance is always an issue.  Apps that provide game-based structures with rewards, clear achievable goals and feedback loops can help.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

Don’t Call Stephens the "Facebook Killer"

It may be catchy, but it’s irresponsible to call Stephens the Facebook killer. It's not about Facebook.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

When people are afraid, they look for something to blame.  Finding a “cause” gives them the illusion that the world makes sense and feels safer.  Thus it’s easy to see how there will be a tendency to target social media tools such as Facebook. The bottom line, however, is that social media doesn’t cause crimes or lure people into committing them.  That line of logic, while it may hold psychological and political appeal, fans the flames of technophobia and doesn’t solve any real social problems.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

The tyranny of stock photos - The Boston Globe

The tyranny of stock photos - The Boston Globe | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
Canned photography thrives in the Internet age — and as fake news proliferates.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The power of image to deliver information and influence meaning in the age of fake news argues for better media literacy training.  While establishing use parameters makes good sense for models, photographers and photo suppliers, expecting stock photo companies to police the use of their photos is  not only unreasonable, but skirts the more important issue of personal responsibility.  Photos influence content meaning by proximity whether related or not. Visual communication is increasingly easy, from SnapChat and Instagram to YouTube.  Media literacy can raise awareness about responsible use and make us smarter about our innate response and less vulnerable to manipulation.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

Theme 1: Things will stay bad, Part I

Theme 1: Things will stay bad, Part I | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
Respondents to this canvassing were very focused on human nature and the special character of online interactions. They offered a series of ideas along these
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

All people instinctively seek certainty and stability to offset the fear of chaos and change. This increases tribalism and ‘othering,’ as people seek to make their worlds feel more stable and controllable. Media provides a means of identifying tribes and groups and these tendencies have deep evolutionary roots. The problem won’t be trolls and general troublemakers – these have always been a minority. The problem is the tendency of the cacophony of negative media voices to increase the social schisms contributing to the rising anger over a world undergoing massive shifts.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

How to stay balanced in a tech-centered city like Austin

How to stay balanced in a tech-centered city like Austin | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
Don't let smartphones take over your life, but rather learn how to unplug and enjoy.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

You don't have to unplug to enjoy social media or life.  The key is balance and using social media with mindfulness.  There are lots of benefits if you use technology with purpose and intention.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

Great Leaders—Are They Made or Born?

Great Leaders—Are They Made or Born? | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
Ask experts what the most asked question about leadership is, and they’ll usually answer "are they made or born?" There are dozens of books, decade’
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

People have far more control over information so leadership theories that promote viewing followers as individuals, with thoughts and needs, fits with the current social climate.  However in today's Twitter-reactive environment, we will do better to focus on theories of brand development to anticipate public policy that try to learn from the history of great leaders. Leadership isn't what's happening today.   It's marketing.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

This Girl is Going to Prison for Live Streaming a Rape on Periscope

This Girl is Going to Prison for Live Streaming a Rape on Periscope | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
A girl who live streamed a rape on Periscope was sentenced to prison.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

This is a cautionary tale to those who think that being a "digital bystander" bears no responsibility.  Social media puts us in the position of observer to many things, from crime and cyberbullying to fake news.  Media literacy is more than just analyzing content, it is empowering digital media and social media users to be responsible citizens.  I encourage all parents, teachers and caretakers to teach their children and teens with the skills they need to be Upstanders.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

People Are Suffering From ‘Trump Trauma.’ Here's Why, and What to Do About It.

People Are Suffering From ‘Trump Trauma.’ Here's Why, and What to Do About It. | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
Rutledge believes it’s this irrationality, and subsequent intolerance and antagonism, that can be the most dangerous fallout, as it “creates a need for safety that overrides reason.” Across social media, she says, people are no longer willing to tolerate differing opinions, and “all of this triggers our instinctive defensive responses, not our rational, cognitive ones.”
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

We may be anxious and depressed in this political environment, but the damage goes much deeper.  The irrationality, and subsequent intolerance and antagonism, is most dangerous fallout of Trump's flamethrower approach.  It creates a need for safety that overrides reason. Across social media people are no longer willing to tolerate differing opinions, and all of this triggers our instinctive defensive responses, causing anger and suppresses our rational, cognitive ones and our ability to have empathy.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

The Tao Of Tom: How Tom Brady Uses An 80-20 Diet, Meditation, Yoga & One Book To Age Backwards

The Tao Of Tom: How Tom Brady Uses An 80-20 Diet, Meditation, Yoga & One Book To Age Backwards | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
In the book Exploring Positive Psychology: The Science of Happiness and Well-Being, authors Erik Gregory and Pamela Rutledge elaborate on Tom’s neurological training. “[Tom] is a real-life example of intentional activities to take advantage of neuroplasticity to maintain cognitive health.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

In the book Exploring Positive Psychology: The Science of Happiness and Well-Being, authors Erik Gregory and Pamela Rutledge elaborate on Tom’s neurological training. “[Tom] is a real-life example of intentional activities to take advantage of neuroplasticity to maintain cognitive health.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

Here’s What Happened When I Gave Up Following The News For A Week

Here’s What Happened When I Gave Up Following The News For A Week | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
"Being informed" and being a news junkie are two very different things.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

The psychology of news consumption - there is value in being a mindful consumer.  

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge from #transmediascoop
Scoop.it!

What's Happened to Transmedia?

I got an email in my inbox a week or two ago asking the titular question.
It's been haunting me ever since. "


Via Simon Staffans
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

Transmedia has always had a rocky definition. It may, however, be moving more from a definable thing to a perspective on how to approach communication--whether entertainment, marketing or education.  To me, it has always represented a more accurate user-centered design that reflects how the human brain receives and gathers information and makes meaning of experience--through multiple channels.  It's not surprising that the pioneers of transmedia experiences have moved to the edge of the storytelling envelope, such as VR.  It is where the attention and money are focused given that the opportunities are unknown and thus, full of promise.  As Andrea's article points out, transmedia strategies were not uniformly able to create a viable business model that supported many creative endeavors.  At the same time, the fundamental shifts in the media landscape that impact consumer expectations and demands, not to mention the flood of choice, suggest that awareness of the need for multi-platform engagement only grows.  To me, this suggests that the fundamentals are more important, even if they "only" provide a foundation for thinking about strategies and projects in the way Simon describes.

more...
Simon Staffans's curator insight, September 29, 2016 4:20 AM
"The genie is out of the bottle and can never be returned" Good stuff from Andrea.
Scooped by Dr. Pamela Rutledge
Scoop.it!

How young is too young for a smartphone? We asked the experts

How young is too young for a smartphone? We asked the experts | Psychology of Media & Technology | Scoop.it
When is your child ready to own a smartphone? It’s a difficult question for many parents. We asked some experts and gathered some stats to help you decide.
Dr. Pamela Rutledge's insight:

We continue to look for easy answers for the appropriate age for smartphone use, but there aren't any.  Maturity develops at different rates in children and there is a wide range of uses for smartphones.  Achieving the intersection for your child takes judgment.  But smart technology use isn't about the tools--it's about the fundamentals like critical thinking, ethical judgment and moral behavior AND having an open channel of communication.  You can teach your kids these lessons without ever logging into SnapChat.  It does, however, require an investment in time to build an open relationship of trust based on talking and listening so that your messages are heard.  More importantly, it lets your kids feel safe enough to ask you (instead of some other less qualified person or friend) how to handle tough or confusing situations.

more...
No comment yet.